HIST 2053 - Medieval Europe: Crusades to the Black Death

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2019

This course explores the lives and experiences of three key social orders in western Europe during the Middle Ages: the aristocracy, the church, and the peasantry. We also consider the lives of women, both as members of the three orders and generally. We begin the course in the early Middle Ages with Charlemagne and his successors, and the upheaval caused by Vikings and other invaders. We shall then consider the expansion of European power in the eleventh and twelfth centuries (including the Crusades), and the flourishing of European civilisation and culture, trade and urban life in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. At the end of the course, we discuss the crisis of medieval civilisation that was brought about by conflicts within the Church, the great struggle between France and England, and the Black Death.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 2053
    Course Medieval Europe: Crusades to the Black Death
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of Level I undergraduate study
    Incompatible HIST 2042 or HIST 3042
    Course Description This course explores the lives and experiences of three key social orders in western Europe during the Middle Ages: the aristocracy, the church, and the peasantry. We also consider the lives of women, both as members of the three orders and generally. We begin the course in the early Middle Ages with Charlemagne and his successors, and the upheaval caused by Vikings and other invaders. We shall then consider the expansion of European power in the eleventh and twelfth centuries (including the Crusades), and the flourishing of European civilisation and culture, trade and urban life in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. At the end of the course, we discuss the crisis of medieval civilisation that was brought about by conflicts within the Church, the great struggle between France and England, and the Black Death.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Claire Walker

    This course is taught by:

    Dr Claire Walker
    e-mail: claire.i.walker@adelaide.edu.au
    phone: 831 35159
    office: Napier 312

    Dr Gareth Pritchard
    e-mail: gareth.pritchard@adelaide.edu.au
    phone: 831 34529
    office: Napier 306
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1 demonstrate a broad knowledge of the history of Europe in the middle ages and the ways in which historians have interpreted and explained this history.
    2 identify and use effectively a wide variety of secondary sources relevant to the study of Europe in the middle ages, and in particular to understand and critically to evaluate the arguments of historians.
    3 contextualise and interpret a wide variety of primary sources, including medieval texts, images and physical artefacts.
    4 construct evidence-based arguments in which students engage with the key debates about the nature of European society in the middle ages.
    5 communicate their own ideas about medieval history - both orally and in writing - in a manner that is clear and persuasive.
    6 access and use effectively the wide range of relevant primary and secondary sources on medieval history that are available on-line.
    7 develop and communicate their ideas about the middle ages within the scholarly conventions of the discipline of history.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    3, 4
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    5, 7
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    4, 5, 6
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1, 4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    The text book for this course Wim Blockmans and Peter Hoppenbrouwers, Introduction to Medieval Europe, 300-1500, third edition (London: Routledge, 2018).
    Recommended Resources
    Maurice Keen, The Pelican History of Medieval Europe is a useful introduction to and survey of the Middle Ages. It is not supposed to be a comprehensive, authoritative textbook. Keen’s book has its advantages; it is cheap, well written and has a strong analytical theme on the nature of the Middle Ages. Its disadvantages are firstly that it covers a limited timeframe, 800-1449 and is geographically limited to Western and Central Europe. However, there are plentiful resources in the Library and on the Internet to cover what Keen does not.

    Other general texts (many do not cover the whole period, c450-c1450):
    Malcolm Barber, The Two Cities: Medieval Europe, 1050-1350
    Judith M. Bennett & C. Warren Hollister, Medieval Europe, A Short History
    R. H. C. Davis, A History of Medieval Europe from Constantine to Saint Louis
    A Daniel Frankforter, The Medieval Millennium
    Friedrich Heer, The Medieval World
    Edward Peters, Europe and the Middle Ages
    Joseph R. Strayer, The Middle Ages
    Brian Tierney, Western Europe in the Middle Ages

    Some other useful background reading:

    Carolly Erickson, The Medieval Vision
    Richard Fletcher, The Conversion of Europe
    Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Montaillou
    Eileen Power, Medieval People
    Jonathan Riley-Smith, What were the Crusades?
    Richard Southern, The Making of the Middle Ages
    Richard Southern, Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages
    R. W. Swanson, Religion and Devotion in Europe, 1215-1515
    Philip Ziegler, The Black Death
    Online Learning
    Canvas will not just be used as a repository of material but as an interactive learning tool. For example, multiple-choice quizzes will consolidate the knowledge gained by students from the course textbook and lectures, and prepare students for the tutorials and written assessments. Students in tutorials will work in groups to address specific themes in the course (e.g. the image and the reality of the Crusading movement or the image and reality of medieval monasticism) which will be posted on Canvas as a learning resource for all students taking the course.

    PowerPoint presentations and audio recordings of lectures will be available at the Canvas course site. Librarians at the Barr-Smith library have also compiled a very useful guide to sources on Australian History held by the University. This can be accessed online at:
    http://www.library.adelaide.edu.au/guide/hum/history/Medieval.html


  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Face-to-face teaching on campus consisting of two lectures and one tutorial per week. Lectures begin in Week 1 of semester and tutorials in Week 2. Attendance at the lectures is important as they provide the context for the tutorial discussions and introduce themes and personalities that students will encounter in the more sophisticated tutorial readings.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students will need to devote approximately 12 hours per week to this course (divided over 12 weeks of study). This consists of 2 x 1-hour lectures and one tutorial per week, and 9 hours per week of independent study, during which time students will prepare for tutorials and work on assignments.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Draft Lecture Program (Please note that these topics and
    dates may vary. Final Program located on MyUni in Februry.)
    Schedule
    Week Lecture
    Week 1 1. Introduction: Medieval History
    2. Europe in the Dark Ages
    Week 2 1. The Carolingian Empire
    2. The Vikings
    Week 3 1. Rise of the Islamic World
    2. Early Medieval Church
    Week 4 1. The Crusades
    2. The Crusader States and their Legacy
    Week 5 1. Monasticism
    2. The Rise of Towns and Trade
    Week 6 1. Chivalry
    2. Art and Architecture
    Mid-Semester Break
    Week 7 1. The Twelfth-Century Renaissance
    2. Heresy
    Week 8 1. The Friars
    2. Medieval Women
    Week 9 1. Limits of Expansion
    2. Medieval Warfare
    Week 10 1.The Black Death
    2.Religion in the Late Middle Ages
    Week 11 1.The Hundred Years' War
    2.Rebellions and Revolts
    Week 12 1. The End of the Middle Ages?
    2. Medievalism in the Modern World
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Students will work in "medieval identity" groups to evaluate the experiences of medieval people to the unfolding events covered in the course work.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    There are four assessment tasks for this course. 
     
    1. Online Quiz (10%)
    2. Research Essay, 2,000 words (40%)
    3. SGDE Assignment, 1,000 words (20%)
    4. Take-Home Exam, 1,000 words (30%)
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Participation in tutorials is a compulsory component of the course. Please inform your tutor prior to the tutorial if you are unable to attend. It may be possible to ‘make-up’ a tutorial at another time.
    Assessment Detail
    The online multiple-choice quiz will be based upon material from classes in the first four weeks of the course.

    The research essay (2,000 words) will answer one of the essay questions to be located on MyUni, and students will be assessed on their research skills, ability to analyse primary and secondary sources, and how they employ the knowledge from these sources in a coherent and well-written response to the question.

    The SGDE Assignment brings together the skills of each member of the group to explain their chosen topic to the rest of the class in the form of a powerpoint presentation or poster.

    The take-home exam requires two short answers of approx. 500 words each. One will relate to a topic from the final weeks of the semester (not covered in research essay topics) and the other will ask students to consider one of the broader themes in the course.
    Submission
    Online Submission of Assignments (e-submission) via MyUni

     Assignments are due before 11:59 pm. They are submitted in electronic format. Precise instructions on how to do this will be issued in due course

    Extensions
    Students wishing to apply for an extension need to submit the relevant form available at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/mod_arrange.html to the faculty office prior to the due date for the assignment.

    Exceptions to the Policy
    If one of the following criteria is met, an informal extension can be organised with the course coordinator or tutor:
    · assessment item is worth 20% or less;
    · student is registered with the Disability Office (need to attach a Access Plan).
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    Once SELTs have been collected and the results analysed, the course convenor will send a document to all students informing them of how their feedback will be taken into account in future versions of the course.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.