MECH ENG 4114 - Corrosion: Principles & Prevention

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2016

The course information on this page is being finalised for 2016. Please check again before classes commence.

This course presents the concepts behind corrosion and corrosion prevention. The different forms of corrosion are introduced, along with how to recognise them. Methods for assessing the extent of corrosion are described including the theory on the reaction chemistry. Finally, ways of designing against corrosion and slowing its progress are discussed. Topics covered include: Fundamentals of corrosion: free energy of oxidation, oxidation and reduction reactions, Pourbaix diagrams, corrosion kinetics, polarization curves, passivation. Design against corrosion. Investigating corrosion failures. Atmospheric and general corrosion, bimetallic corrosion. Differential aeration corrosion: pitting, crevice corrosion, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Environmentally assisted cracking, erosion. Case studies into corrosion failures, identifying mechanisms and evaluating mitigation strategies.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MECH ENG 4114
    Course Corrosion: Principles & Prevention
    Coordinating Unit School of Mechanical Engineering
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible MECH ENG 4061
    Assumed Knowledge CHEM ENG 1009
    Course Description This course presents the concepts behind corrosion and corrosion prevention. The different forms of corrosion are introduced, along with how to recognise them. Methods for assessing the extent of corrosion are described including the theory on the reaction chemistry. Finally, ways of designing against corrosion and slowing its progress are discussed. Topics covered include: Fundamentals of corrosion: free energy of oxidation, oxidation and reduction reactions, Pourbaix diagrams, corrosion kinetics, polarization curves, passivation. Design against corrosion. Investigating corrosion failures. Atmospheric and general corrosion, bimetallic corrosion. Differential aeration corrosion: pitting, crevice corrosion, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Environmentally assisted cracking, erosion. Case studies into corrosion failures, identifying mechanisms and evaluating mitigation strategies.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Erwin Gamboa

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Up to two 2 hour lectures per week. In some weeks, the lectures will be tutorials. Two loratory sessions over the semester

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the course, students should be able to:

    1 recognise the different forms of corrosion;
    2 identify likely forms of corrosion that a system could be susceptible to;
    3 estimate product lifetime in corrosive environments;
    4 design against corrosion;
    5 design protection systems against corrosion of infrastructure, plant, equipment and machinery;
    6 ability to apply knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals;
    7 ability to communicate effectively, not only with engineers but also with the community at large;
    8 in-depth technical competence in at least one engineering discipline;
    9 ability to undertake problem identification, formulation and solution;
    10 ability to utilise a systems approach to design and operational performance;
    11 ability to function effectively as an individual and in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams, with the capacity to be a leader or manager as well as an effective team member;
    12 understanding of the professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them;
    13 expectation of the need to undertake lifelong learning, and the capacity to do so.
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    Lecture notes provided are a brief guide, students are expected to do further reading out of recommended resources.

    Recommended Resources

    Corrosion for Science and Engineering (Trethewey and Chamberlain), 2nd Edition, Pearson Education 1998

    Corrosion Engineering (Roberge), McGraw Hill 2008

    Corrosion Engineering (Fontana), 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill 1986

    Uhlig’s Corrosion Handbook (Revie), 2nd Edition, John Wiley 2000

    Online Learning

    Further material will be available through MyUni under the “Course Material” section for this subject.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    The assignments take the form of open-ended industry problems, which tests students’ ability to bring information (from class and from their research) to bear on the given problem. As with all things in life, there is no single right answer to the assignments. Answers that demonstrate a well reasoned approach to solving the problem, taking account of all of the parameters that impact on the solution, attract full marks. This tests not only the students’ ability to provide a technically correct answer, but also one that is succinct and readily understandable by others. The assignments are marked, with the mark contributing to the final grade for the subject. Feedback is provided on each student’s work along with a general solution to the assignment being discussed in class and posted on MyUni.

    The assignments allow the students to demonstrate their deep understanding of the subject matter applied to a case study of their choice. The assignment is a formative assessment, based on the ability of the students to draw on what they have researched and learned and apply it.

    The examination is a summative assessment and is intended to assess the student’s knowledge and understanding of the course material and how it fits into the global engineering context.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    It is recommended that students spend some time prior to each class revising the appropriate background knowledge in chemistry, as this course will build upon material covered in that area.

    Despite the apparently simple theory of corrosion, its application to industry practice is very complex and “non-textbook”, so students are expected to spend further time in doing the recommended reading.

    The assignments should be completed with 5 hours’ work each.

    Learning Activities Summary

    Topic 1: Introduction to corrosion. Costs to society. History of corrosion. Electrochemical nature of corrosion. Types of cells (dissimilar electrodes, concentration, differential aeration).

    Topic 2: Eight forms of corrosion (general, pitting, crevice, dealloying, intergranular corrosion, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen embrittlement) and other unusual forms of corrosion (polymers, liquid metal embrittlement, ceramics, microbial induced corrosion).

    Topic 3: Thermodynamics of corrosion. Change in Gibb’s free energy. Standard Hydrogen Electrode. Galvanic coupling/series.

    Topics 4 and 5: Pourbaix diagrams. Stability of oxides. Electrode kinetics (activation polarisation, concentration polarisation, exchange current density). Activation polarisation – forward and backward reactions. Tafel equation.

    Topic 6: Galvanic coupling. Area and environment effects. Galvanic protection, cathodic protection of structures.

    Topic 7: Passivity of metals. Oxide layers, potentiodynamic scans. Influence on cathodic half reaction by oxidiser concentration, velocity, temperature, corrosion current.

    Topic 8: Inhibitors, corrosive concentrations vs oxidiser concentrations. Atmospheric corrosion.

    Topic 9: Measuring corrosion rates. Weight loss, electrochemical methods (potentiodynamic scans, Tafel extrapolation, linear polarisation).

    Topic 10: Design against corrosion. Basic requirements, design options, minimise costs. Rules and suggestions (corrosion allowance, simplify methods of construction, avoid moisture/provide drainage, avoid galvanic corrosion and their protective measures, care with joints and junctions, coatings, inhibitors and insulators).

    Industry speakers will be invited to speak to the class through the semester. Advance notice will be given to the class of each visit.

    Specific Course Requirements

    This course will undertake at least one field trip as part of the course. The destination will be announced in advance. Further details will be announced through MyUni. The field trip is typically two hours long and is within Adelaide. Students are expected to arrange for their own transport.

    The minimum requirement for attendance at the field trip is long sleeve clothing, safety glasses and steel cap toes.

    Small Group Discovery Experience
    The laboratories for this course are designed to be activities led by the student to allow exploration of the topics covered in class as applied to practical corrosion problems.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    Assignments: 10% each (20% total). 

    Laboratories: 2% each (10% total). 

    Exam: 70% total

    Assessment Related Requirements

    Attendance at laboratories is compulsory. If the total mark for laboratories is less than 30% for that section, the student will automatically fail the subject.

    Assessment Detail

    Assignments will be marked for clarity, proper referencing, interpretation and justification of results. Justification and explanation of thought process can be as important as the final numerical answer given.

    Submission

    Submissions are to be handed in to the submission box located on level 2 of Engineering South Building with a signed cover page. Submissions not having a cover page will not be marked.

    It is compulsory to hand in the assignment electronically to “Turnitin”. User names and password will be supplied in class.

    It is strongly recommended that an electronic submission is also submitted to the “Digital dropbox” within MyUni. This ensures that they are timestamped and that there is a backup copy submitted in case there are problems later with the paper copy.

    - Electronic submission file MUST be named in the format of “s(student number) Asst 1”. If you submit a file with a different filename, it will not be marked.

    - An easy way to compile the assignment is to scan handwritten calculations and diagrams, and then to insert them into the main document.

    - Your submission needs to include all appendices, etc within the file. Separate files will not be marked.

    Any late submission will be marked at -10% penalties per calendar day late.

    Marked assignments and quizzes will be returned in the “submission return” pigeonholes in the second floor of Engineering South (beside the elevator).

    Students are encouraged to contact the lecturer as soon as possible if there is a problem with handing in assignments/quizzes so as to request a different deadline.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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