MECH ENG 4126 - Topics in Welded Structures

North Terrace Campus - Summer - 2017

This course presents the concepts behind welding and joining technology. These include welding and joining techniques, equipment and consumables, weldability of engineering materials, economics, standards, health and safety, testing and repair. The concepts are then applied to the design and fabrication of engineering components, process plant and structures. The importance of selecting the correct welding process and parameters for a particular application will be demonstrated by investigating several case studies. Since a weld/joint can have a profound effect on the performance of a component depending on the in-service conditions it experiences, the influence of service environment will be investigated. At the end of the course students should have the concepts to assist in the selection of processes and parameters to make appropriately designed, sound joints, fit for service in the operating environment.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MECH ENG 4126
    Course Topics in Welded Structures
    Coordinating Unit School of Mechanical Engineering
    Term Summer
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Intensive - 10 days
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Assumed Knowledge CHEM ENG 1009
    Course Description This course presents the concepts behind welding and joining technology. These include welding and joining techniques, equipment and consumables, weldability of engineering materials, economics, standards, health and safety, testing and repair. The concepts are then applied to the design and fabrication of engineering components, process plant and structures. The importance of selecting the correct welding process and parameters for a particular application will be demonstrated by investigating several case studies. Since a weld/joint can have a profound effect on the performance of a component depending on the in-service conditions it experiences, the influence of service environment will be investigated. At the end of the course students should have the concepts to assist in the selection of processes and parameters to make appropriately designed, sound joints, fit for service in the operating environment.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Reza Ghomashchi

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    The primary aim of the course is to provide students with the basic skills and knowledge required to select an appropriate welding process and identity the welding essentials variables for the manufacture of a component or assembly.

    The course develops an understanding of the inter-relationships of material structure and properties, welding processes. On completion of the course students are expected to have:
    1. A demonstrable knowledge of a range of welding processes;
    2. Analytical methods for understanding the process variables;
    3. The ability to select welding processes appropriate for particular applications;
    4. An understanding of the importance of economic and environmental factors when considering the application of a process;
    5. An understanding of the fundamental concepts governing the formation of welding defects;
    6. The ability to specify an appropriate method of non-destructive examination for a range of welding defects;
    7. Developed an understanding of welding QA/QC systems.
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    • Extensive lecture notes are provided. The purchase of text-books is not necessary for the successful completion of this course though it is encouraged for extra learning.
    • Electronic copies of the lecture notes as well as any additional material provided in-class will be available through the online MyUni system.
    Recommended Resources
    Many suitable text-books are available for further reading through the University of Adelaide Library, and are available for purchase from text-book suppliers.

    Recommended reading:
    • Welding Metallurgy, 2nd Edition Sindo Kou ISBN: 978-0-471-43491-7
    • Applied Welding Engineering , Ramesh Singh ISBN: 978-0-12-391916-8
    Online Learning

    Electronic copies of the lecture notes as well as any additional material provided in-class will be available through the online MyUni system. Extended study material will also be provided through the online system for students keen to gain further knowledge and application.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    Teaching will conducted through a series of lectures, practical session’s industry workshops.

    Assignments and in-class quizzes are provided as part of the learning experience. Students are expected to enhance their knowledge, problem solving skills and understanding of the subject matter through completing the assignments and quizzes, so they are regarded as formative rather than summative. The assignments and quizzes are marked, with the mark contributing to the final grade for the subject to ensure that students actually do the assignments and quizzes and take them seriously. It also helps to assess whether the required graduate attributes are being developed.

    The laboratory class is intended to provide students with some practical experience in using welding techniques. The examination is a summative assessment and is intended to assess the student’s knowledge and understanding of the course material and how it fits into the global engineering context.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    This intensive course will consist of 50 contact hours. Students are expected to match these hours with an equivalent of self-study hours.

    Learning Activities Summary
    • Day 1: Welding Processes
      • Introduction/ Overview
      • Welding Process Fundamentals
    • Day 2: Metallurgy of the welding of metals
      • Overview - types of materials, structure and properties of metals, phase diagrams, strengthening mechanisms
      • Steels - metallurgy, and heat-treatment, carbon equivalent, weldability index
      • Welding of alloy steels, characteristics and effects of alloying elements
      • Welding of Q&T steels
      • Welding of stainless steels
      • Welding of aluminium and its alloys
      • Welding of cast irons
      • Wear resistant materials and hard facing
    • Day 3: Welding Specification
      • Welder qualification
      • Weld qualification and consumables
      • Weld procedures
      • PQR
      • Welding Economics
        • Processes
        • Skill level
        • Consumables
        • Risk management
    • Day 4: Welding Processes Workshop
    • Day 5: Tutorials and Assignment
    • Day 6: Design requirement
      • Structural design and analysis
      • Primary stresses
      • Residual stresses
      • Undermatching, overmatching, matching to base material
    • Day 7: Failure modes
      • Environment
      • Consequences of Failure
      • Weld repair
      • Health and safety
        • Electrocution
        • Fume
        • Confined spaces
    • Day 8: NDT
    • Day 9: Workshop
    • Day 10: Tutorials and Assignment 2
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    Workshops (Short quiz 5% each)

    Tutorials and assignments (20%)

    Examination (70%)

    Open book, 3 hours, 1 week after completion of second week

    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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  • Policies & Guidelines
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