CLAS 2023 - Emotions in Antiquity

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2015

The course focuses upon the ways in which various 'passions' or extreme emotional states (love, hate, rage, jealousy, grief, joy etc.) were expressed and explored in the poetry and prose of the Ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Beginning with the love poetry of the Greek poet Sappho (6th century BC) and ending with the early Christian poet Prudentius' descriptions of the 'passions' of the martyrs (5th century CE), the course will traverse a wide variety of genres and emotional states including the invective and ridicule of early Greek poets such as Hipponax, the satirical poetry of the Roman poets Juvenal and Martial and the mourning elegies and lyrics of poets such as Catullus and Horace. Throughout the course we will explore such questions as: How did people deal with and react to extreme emotional states in the ancient world?; Why is poetry such a good vehicle for conveying emotion?; To what extent were there set conventions and established methods of conveying these emotions in ancient literature? How far were various emotions a product of the particular social conditions under which they were produced?

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code CLAS 2023
    Course Emotions in Antiquity
    Coordinating Unit Classics
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of level 1 Arts courses
    Course Description The course focuses upon the ways in which various 'passions' or extreme emotional states (love, hate, rage, jealousy, grief, joy etc.) were expressed and explored in the poetry and prose of the Ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Beginning with the love poetry of the Greek poet Sappho (6th century BC) and ending with the early Christian poet Prudentius' descriptions of the 'passions' of the martyrs (5th century CE), the course will traverse a wide variety of genres and emotional states including the invective and ridicule of early Greek poets such as Hipponax, the satirical poetry of the Roman poets Juvenal and Martial and the mourning elegies and lyrics of poets such as Catullus and Horace. Throughout the course we will explore such questions as: How did people deal with and react to extreme emotional states in the ancient world?; Why is poetry such a good vehicle for conveying emotion?; To what extent were there set conventions and established methods of conveying these emotions in ancient literature? How far were various emotions a product of the particular social conditions under which they were produced?
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Clarke

    Dr Jacqueline Clarke
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students should be able to:

    1. Explain how emotions functioned within ancient societies

    2. Describe the cultural differences between ancient and modern views of and ways of dealing with emotion

    3. Appreciate the important social role that poetry played in the ancient world as a vehicle for exploring and expressing emotional states

    4.Confidently engage in close reading of ancient texts across a variety of genres

    5. Skilfully analyse, evaluate and compare ancient (’primary’) literary evidence and modern (‘secondary’) theories and reconstructions, both on emotions and on literature

    6. Explore, articulate and debate their views in small-group seminars

    7. Deliver coherently and logically argued written material which has a scholarly approach to analysis and presentation of ideas




    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 3, 4
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 5
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 2
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 6, 7
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 2
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    It is essential that students purchase the Emotions in Antiquity Reader which can be ordered at cost price from the Image and Copy Centre. This will cover the primary material for certain seminar topics.

    As six of the seminars  deal with the Iliad and/or Aeneid it is essential that students also purchase the set translations below of these two texts:

    The Iliad: Homer translated by Robert Fagles (Penguin New York, London 1990)

    Virgil: Aeneid  translated by Frederick Ahl (Oxford World's Classics, Oxford 2007)

    Recommended Resources

    While it is desirable that students purchase the texts below, it is not absolutely essential that they buy them all (this may depend on their budgetary contraints and on whether they are writing a seimar paper on one of the plays); there are a limited number of copies that may also be borrowed from the library. The set translations are:

    Sophocles: King Oidipous Introduction, Translation and Essay by Ruby Blondell (Focus Classical Library 2002)

    Sophocles: Philoctetes Translated with notes, introduction and interpretive essay by Seth. L. Schein (Focus Classical Library 2003)

    Euripides: Four Plays: Medea, Hippolytus, Heracles, Bacchae Translated by Stephen Esposito (Focus Classical Library 2004)

    Euripides: The Trojan Women Translated with introduction and notes by Diskin Clay (Focus Classical Library 2005)

    Online Learning
    The powerpoints and recordings of lectures with be placed on MyUni. Recordings, however, sometimes fail and students are advised not to rely on these as a sustitute for lecture attendance.

    Most of the reading material for each seminar will be placed on MyUni or information will be provided on how to access it.

    The seminar summaries and seminar essays will be submitted and marked online.

    Students are expected to consult the announcements board at least twice a week and must closely read all emails sent via MyUni.

    Guidelines to formatting footnotes and bibliography are placed upon MyUni. Students are expected to read and consult these.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The format of the course consists of one lecture a week supported by two hour problem-solving seminars which develop topics covered in the lectures.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 1 hour lecture per week 12 hours per semester
    1 x 2 hour seminar (or equivalent) per week 24 hours per semester
    5 hours reading per week 60 hours per semester
    4 hours written work per week 48 hours per semester
    1 hour revision per week 12 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    The learning activities are largely centered around the seminars which involve close reading of and discussion of a number of key ancient authors, texts and/or text excerpts that treat the various emotions studied in the course. (N.B.: These texts are provisional.)

    Week 2 Discussion of ancient and modern textual sources on
    emotions

    Week 3 Homer Iliad 1 Virgil Aeneid 2
    Week 4 Sophocles Oedipus Rex Euripides Medea
    Week 5 Sappho and Greek Lyric Latin Love Poetry
    Week 6 Catullus Poem 64 Virgil Aeneid 4

    Week 7 Homer Iliad 16 and 18 Euripides Trojan Women
    Week 8 Catullus, Horace and Cicero Virgil Aeneid 10
    Week 9 Greek and Roman Iambics and Other Poetry of Invective Juvenal and Tacitus
    Week 10 Homer Iliad 22 and Virgil Aeneid 12 Sophocles Philoctetes
    Week 11 Euripides Bacchae Prudentius Passions of the Martyrs (Peristephanon 2, 14)
    Specific Course Requirements
    In order to facilitate discussion, students are expected to bring copies of the set texts or text excerpts to each seminar.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    The small group discovery experience in this course will be based around the seminars. Many of the seminars during the semester will involve students separating into discussion groups to analyse key portions of text or deal with specific questions relating to the text. They will then report back on their findings to the class.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1400 word essay Formative and summative 24% 1, 2, 3, 4, 8
    1400 word essay Formative and summative 24% 1, 2, 3, 4, 8
    300 word seminar summaries Formative and summative 12% 1
    Exam or 2500 word academic journal Largely summative (can also be formative as feedback available on request) 40% 1, 2, 3, 4, 8
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students are expected to attend the lectures and seminars. They are required to read the primary sources and primary source excerpts for all the seminars in preparation for the discussion that will occur. They are also required to bring the relevant primary sources or primary source excerpts to the seminars to refer to them during the discussion.

    Seminar topics will be allocated at the introductory class. Each topic will be limited to three students on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. The first topic must be selected from weeks 3-6 and the second from weeks 7-11.

    For the academic journals and seminar essays, students are expected to follow the guidelines to footnotes and bibliographies set out in the course handbook and on MyUni.
    Assessment Detail
    1500 word essay 1: students submit a seminar essay chosen from the topics in the first half of the course.

    1500 word essay 2: students submit a seminar essay chosen from the topics in the second half of the course.

    The seminar summaries are a succint 'answer' to the seminar topics. They cannot be on seminars for which a paper is submitted. They must be submitted within 48 hours of the seminar.

    Academic Journal: This should be a weekly record of students' personal reflection on the material they encounter, through their reading and in other ways, and the issues they raise. There should be evidence that they (a) have read the texts and what is in the reader (but they should also reflect on works not contained therein which they have found themselves) and (b) there should be some sign of an evolution and deepening of thought about emotions and the roles which they play in ancient literature as the semester proceeds.

    Exam: covers all aspects of the course.






    Submission
    The essays and seminar summaries are to be submitted online via MyUni. The essays must be submitted before the seminar on that topic is held, the summaries within 48 hours of the seminar.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.