EDUC 2001 - Issues in Contemporary Education

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2017

This course will focus on understanding some of the important issues facing education today. It will also introduce student to theories which help to explain and provide practical approaches to dealing with these issues in the schools context. It is an expectation that students demonstrate that they have met the required levels of personal literacy and numeracy broadly equivalent to the top 30% of the population. The National Literacy and Numeracy Test is the means for demonstrating that all students have met the standard.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code EDUC 2001
    Course Issues in Contemporary Education
    Coordinating Unit School of Education
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites EDUC 1001 & EDUC 1100
    Restrictions EDUC 1001 & EDUC 1100
    Course Description This course will focus on understanding some of the important issues facing education today. It will also introduce student to theories which help to explain and provide practical approaches to dealing with these issues in the schools context. It is an expectation that students demonstrate that they have met the required levels of personal literacy and numeracy broadly equivalent to the top 30% of the population. The National Literacy and Numeracy Test is the means for demonstrating that all students have met the standard.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Nina Maadad

    Course coordinator and Lecturer:
    Dr Nina Maadad,
    Room 8.33,
    ph. 8313 3711
    email: nina.maadad@adelaide.edu.au

    Nina is generally in the office on Monday to Thursday. She will be available to talk to students at anytime if she is in the office, just drop in or phone. Alternatively you can email her your queries or request a consultation time.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Week 1

    Tutorial Reading              Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Chapter 1
                                         "What is teaching all about?"
                                          Course Reader: Reading #1 ‘On Teaching’
                                        

    Lecture                          Teaching as a Profession  (Using the perspectives of the individual, group and                                                                      community and supporting student well-being: the case study of challenging behaviour).
                                           
    Week 2 
    Tutorial Reading              Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Part 5
                                         "Professional and Cultural Dimensions"
                                         Course Reader: Reading #2 ‘What keeps teachers going?’           
                                                                Reading #2 (1) 'Decision Makers in Education'

    Lecture                           Resources in education (School management, corporate interest)
     
    Week 3
    Tutorial Reading              Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Chapter 4
                                         "Learner motivation and Developing Self-Esteem" 
                                         Course Reader: Reading #3 'Mental Health for Teachers'

    Lecture                           Student wellbeing (Mental health)
     
    Week 4 
    Tutorial Reading             Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Chapter 2
                                        "The Education Revolution: National Curriculum and Equity"
                                        Course Reader: Reading #4 ‘How does ‘othering’ constitute cultural discrimination?’ 
                                                               Reading # 4 (1)  ' Recognising Our History: Dealing with Australia's 
                                                                                          Past in the Contemporary Classroom'

    Lecture                          Social justice (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, multiculturalism)
     
    Week 5                       
    Tutorial Reading            Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Chapter 16
                                        "Teaching, Values and Moral Education".

    Lecture                         Values education 
     
    Week 6
    Tutorial Reading            Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Chapters 13 and 17
                                       "Classroom Management", "Working Effectively with Parents"
                                        Course Reader: Reading #6 ‘What do we mean by risky kids?’
                                                               Reading # 6 (1) 'Learning Outcomes'.

    Lecture                         Learning difficulties (Environmental factors, Asperger’s)
     
    Week 7
    Tutorial Reading            Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Chapter 5
                                       "Learning Environments"
                                       Course Reader: Reading # 7 'Understanding Gender'
                                                              Reading # 7 (1) 'Boys will be Boys and Girls will be Girls:
                                                                                      Gender and Sexuality in Schools'.

     Lecture                         Sex, Gender and Identities in the Classroom
      
    Week 8
    Tutorial Reading            Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Part 2
                                       "Student Learning"
                                       Course Reader: Reading #8 ‘Preventing School Violence’.
    Lecture                         Developing Behaviour (Early Years, Relationships) 
     
    Week 9
    Tutorial Reading          Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Part 3
                                      "How Teachers Organise and Teach".
                                       Course Reader: Reading # 9 Effective Teaching Strategies : The Australian Curriculum Framework.
                                      

    Lecture                        Curriculum: What is it and how has it evolved? (including ICT)
     
    Week 10
    Tutorial Reading           Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Chapters 5 and 17
                                      Course Reader: Reading # 10 ‘How do culture and race influence literacy?’
                                                             Reading # 10(1) 'Bilingualism and Bilingual Education'
                                                             Reading # 10(2) 'Professional Knowledge across the Curriculum'.

    Lecture                        Literacy and Language (Classroom diversity)
     
    Week 11
    Tutorial Reading          Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Chapter 15 
                                     "Meeting the Diverse Needs of Students".
                                     Course Reader: Reding # 11 The Concept of Different 'Learning Styles' is One of the Greatest
                                                                                Neuroscience Myths. 
                                    
    Lecture                       Learning styles (Teacher / student relationships, motivation) 
     
    Week 12
    Tutorial Reading         Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher, Chapter 14.1-5 and Chapter 3

    Lecture                      The Diversity of South Australian Schools: Past, Present and Future (History, 
                                      school environment, schools as systems)


    Guest presenters will attend some sessions. Prior notice will be given in these instances.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1 Identify strategies to support inclusive student participation and engagement in classroom activities drawing on knowledge of societal structures, student psychology and theories of knowledge and (dis)ability.
    2 Demonstrate knowledge of practical approaches to manage challenging behaviour knowledge of student psychology and societal structures.
    3 Describe strategies that support students' well-being and safety working within school and / or system, curriculum and legislative requirements drawing on historical and societal knowledge.
    4 Demonstrate an understanding of the relevant issues and the strategies available to support the safe, responsible and ethical use of ICT in learning and teaching drawing on theories of knowledge and student psychology.
    5 Describe a broad range of strategies for involving parents/ carers in the educative process drawing on societal knowledge.
    6 Demonstrate broad knowledge of, understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and languages drawing on historical and philosophical knowledge.
    7 Organise classroom activities and provide directions in a way that caters to student learning styles.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 4,6-7
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2, 4, 5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1, 2, 5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    3,5, 6
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    2, 4
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1, 3, 4, 5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Text Book (s)

    Core text

    Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher (6th, ed.), Pearson Education Australia: NSW, Frenchs Forest.

    This text will also be used during other courses in the degree programme. Becoming a teacher is available at Unibooks.

    Reader
    The Course Reader (Issues in Contemporary Education EDUC 2001) supplements the core text and  is available at the Image and Copy Centre (ICC), Level 1, Hughes Building.
    Recommended Resources
    Reference text


    Ground-Water, S., Ewing, R., & Le Cornu., (2015). Teaching Challenges & Dilemmas (5th Ed.), Cengage Learning Australia: South Melbourne, Victoria.

    The following practical text will be used during tutorials to model effective classroom thinking strategies. It is a useful resource that will be valuable for your future classroom planning and teaching.

    Frangenheim, E. 2005, Reflections on classroom thinking strategies, Rodin Educational Consultancy: Queensland.
    Online Learning

     The course material and associated lecture power points are all on MyUni for the course.

    Live lectures will be uploaded as soon as possible after the lecture has been delivered.

    Please read your emails on daily basis to keep up with latest education materials related to our topics.

     

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lecture format is the primary teaching mode for this course. Opportunity for student participation will include small group discussions and individual exercises. Further practical implementation of concepts presented through the course will occur in tutorials.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.


    Lecture attendance: Attendance at lectures is strongly recommended. It is 1 hour per week (some lectures will be extended for 2 hours but you will all be notified prior to attendance)


    Lecture: Wednesday, 9 am, Ligertwood 333 Lecture Theatre

    Follow up activities and assignment work: 2 hours per week

    The lecture series will introduce students to a range of educational issues that will be explored and discussed in depth during tutorials. 
     

     
    Tutorial 50 minutes 

    Refer for the timetable and availability of all tutorials on the course planner

    Attendance and participation is compulsory. If you cannot attend due to sickness or other valid reason then you must hand to me personally a copy of the doctor’s certificate for each missed session plus 700 words of reflection on the readings for each missed session. Put a cover sheet with your name, number and tutorials missed in summary form. Failure to do this will result in you being considered absent.




    Learning Activities Summary
    Lectures

    Wednesday 9 am, Ligertwood, 333 Lecture Theatre.


    Attendance at lectures is strongly recommended. Most lectures are 50 minutes (unless announced previously).
     

    The lecture series will introduce students to a range of educational issues that will be explored and discussed in depth during tutorials.

    Specific Course Requirements
    The course consists of lectures, tutorials, field study and case work as well as an exam. Contact hours are minimal to allow time for students to pursue their areas of interest for the case and field study assignments. Students are also required to arrange times with partners in preparing a case study presentation.

    A case study approach will be taken in tutorials allowing students to explore and connect real situations with examples and theories presented in lectures. Issues will be analysed using the framework outlined earlier under ‘Course Objectives’.

    Tutorials will also be used for scheduled pair presentations as part of the assessment for this course.

    The reduced course contact time allows tutorial numbers to be kept to a maximum of 15 participants. Students are expected to prepare for tutorials by familiarizing themselves with the set readings. Tutorials will be structured in ways that ensure that everyone has opportunity to contribute to the topic discussion.

    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Focus
    Contemporary classroom teaching and learning issues and challenges and teaching responses: students and teachers.

    SGDE
    What pedagogic challenges do teachers and students face when working in classrooms and schools?

    Method
    At your first SGDE with the aid or your lecturer/professor get into groups of 4. You need to work co-operatively during the semester in these groups. Remember you have worked in groups in year one so this experience needs to be kept in mind.

    Arrange to watch one of the following series which are recent documentary series dealing with contemporary teaching and learning and pedagogic practice:

    Educating Essex
    Educating Yorkshire
    Tough Young Teachers
    Harrow- A Very British Public School

    All of these are available on You Tube are recent and highly relevant.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Learning Outcome
    Case Study Presentation Presentation 15% 2, 3, 5
    Field Study Report Field Study Report 15% 3, 7
    Exam Exam 60% 1, 2, 4, 6
    Attendance and Class Participation 10% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    School Placement Teaching and observing Completion of five days country placement is compolsury to pass the course 1,2,3,4,5,6
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Small Group Discovery
    Classes will be held weekly. Membership of tutorial classes is to be finalised by the end of the second week of semester. Students wishing to swap between tutorial classes after this time are required to present their case to the lecturer-in-charge, but should be aware that such a request may not be approved.
     
    These are an important component of your learning in this course. The communication skills developed in the group by regularly and actively participating in discussions are considered to be most important by the School and are highly regarded by employers and professional bodies.

    Case Study Paired work
    Case studies will be prepared and presented in pairs. A significant part of the preparation will be the collection and analysis of data related to the topic. Students are encouraged to investigate options for data collection early in the course to ensure successful completion of case studies in time for tutorial presentations.

    Field Study Individual negotiation
    Field study will allow students to pursue their own areas of interest and connect with professionals in the field. Findings from field studies will be presented as a report for assessment and later incorporated into future portfolios.

    The University expects full-time students (ie those taking 12 units per semester) to devote a total of 48 hours per week to their studies. Students in this course are expected to attend all lectures throughout the semester plus one tutorial class each week. Please refer to Access Adelaide for your timetable and enrolment details.
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/access/
    Assessment Detail
    The course consists of lectures, Small Group Discoveries, field study and case work. Contact hours are minimal to allow time for students to pursue their areas of interest for the case and field study assignments. Students are also required to arrange times with partners in preparing a case study presentation.

    A case study approach will be taken in Small group discovery allowing students to explore and connect real situations with examples and theories presented in lectures. Issues will be analysed using the framework outlined earlier under ‘Course Objectives’.

    Small group discovery will also be used for scheduled pair presentations as part of the assessment for this course. The reduced course contact time allows tutorial numbers to be kept to a maximum of 15 participants. Students are expected to prepare for tutorials by familiarizing themselves with the set readings. Tutorials will be structured in ways that ensure that everyone has opportunity to contribute to the topic discussion.

    Submission

    Field Study Report:
     
    1. Double space the lines. Use at least 12 point and a clear and legible font. This makes it easier for the maximum grade to be awarded by staff that wear multifocal spectacles but are otherwise kind and caring, full of compassion, slow to anger and rich in mercy.

    2. Leave a margin of at least one inch on the left hand side of the paper.

    3. Use a footer or header with your name, course and page number.

    4. A title page should be placed at the front of the assignment. This should contain your name, the subject, the title of the assignment, the name of the lecturer concerned, and the date. All assignments must be accompanied by an Essay Cover Sheet, which includes a Statement of Authorship

    5. Students who wish to submit assignments via the postal system must ensure the envelopes are post marked no later than the due date for submission and are sent by registered mail. Students are advised that the School of Education takes no responsibility for assignments sent by post.

    6. Assignments will not be accepted for marking after other work in that subject has been returned unless a special consideration request has been approved.

    7. The completed assignment should be stapled or fastened in the top left hand corner. Please do not use manila or other forms of folders and please do not under any circumstances place each separate page in a separate plastic envelope.


    8. Keep a hard copy of your the assignment/ report and other submitted work. Sometimes accidents do happen, mail fails to arrive or computers crash.

    Note: Failure to follow these prescriptions will result in a lower mark on the essay.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as CEQ surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/ ), course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at least once every 2 years. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data can be found at: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/selt/aggregates
  • Student Support


    Academic Support
    Maths, writing and speaking skills
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/students  

    Counselling Service
    Personal counselling for issues affecting study
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/counselling_centre  

    International Student Care
    Ongoing support
    http://www.international.adelaide.edu.au/support/isc  

    Student Care
    Advocacy, confidential counselling, welfare support and advice
    http://www.auu.org.au/site/page.cfm?u=69

    Students with a Disability
    Alternative academic arrangements
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/disability  


    Alternative Examination Arrangements Policy
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/63  


    Reasonable Adjustments to Teaching & Assessment for Students with a Disability Policy
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/64
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.