EDUC 2001 - Issues in Contemporary Education

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2021

This course will focus on understanding some of the important issues facing education today. It will also introduce students to theories which help to explain and provide practical approaches to dealing with these issues in the schools context. For students studying the Bachelor of Teaching, it is an expectation that students demonstrate that they have met the required levels of personal literacy and numeracy broadly equivalent to the top 30% of the population. All Bachelor of Teaching (Middle) and Bachelor of Teaching (Secondary) students commencing from 2019 will participate in the School of Education's eLearning Program, that requires students to own an iPad with pencil and keyboard. The University of Adelaide will assist students with procurement upon enrolment.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code EDUC 2001
    Course Issues in Contemporary Education
    Coordinating Unit School of Education
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites EDUC 1001 & EDUC 1100
    Course Description This course will focus on understanding some of the important issues facing education today. It will also introduce students to theories which help to explain and provide practical approaches to dealing with these issues in the schools context. For students studying the Bachelor of Teaching, it is an expectation that students demonstrate that they have met the required levels of personal literacy and numeracy broadly equivalent to the top 30% of the population.

    All Bachelor of Teaching (Middle) and Bachelor of Teaching (Secondary) students commencing from 2019 will participate in the School of Education's eLearning Program, that requires students to own an iPad with pencil and keyboard. The University of Adelaide will assist students with procurement upon enrolment.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Linda Westphalen

    Course Coordinator:
    Dr Linda Westphalen,
    Room 805, Level 8, Nexus 10
    ph. 8313 3784
    email: linda.westphalen@adelaide.edu.au

    Linda is in her office most days, but her principle consultation time is 12 - 1pm Fridays.  If you are unable to make contact during this time, please email Linda (linda.westphalen@adelaide.edu.au) to arrange an alternative.  Remember that we are here to help.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Students are expected to participate in one lecture, one online task and one tutorial per week.  The lecture is done by zoom and will be recorded and uploaded to MyUni.  The second hour is used for online tasks, open discussion and for critical announcements related to Program content, including Professional Experiences in semester 2.  Thus the lecture and online task will be delivered via Zoom:  a link will be provided via MyUni.

    Tutorials are a critical part of your professional learning and will take place face to face.   Please DO NOT change your tutorial time.  COVID restrictions mean that we need to be mindful of room capacities.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:


    Learning Outcome

    APST (Graduate)

    1 Identify strategies to support inclusive student participation and engagement in classroom activities. 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, 3.2, 3.4, 3.7, 4.1, 4.4, 4.5, 6.3, 7.1, 7.2.
    2 Critically review socio-cultural issues and contexts that impact on student behaviour. 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.4, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 6.4, 7.3, 7.4.
    3 Describe and inculcate strategies to foster students' and teachers' well-being in professional practice. 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.5, 3.1, 3.3, 4.4, 6.3.
    4 Demonstrate an understanding of safe, responsible and ethical use of ICT in learning and teaching. 2.6, 3.4, 3.7, 4.5, 6.1, 7.1, 7.2.
    5 Understand the cultural contexts of schools, including the roles of parents/carers. 1.3, 1.4, 3.5, 3.7, 5.5, 6.4, 7.3, 7.4.
    6 Articulate strategies that support the inclusion of Aboriginal and Islander heritages in learning. 1.3, 1.4, 2.4, 7.1, 7.2.
    7 Understand inclusive teaching practices that are respectful of individual student learning needs. 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.2, 3.3, 3.6, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3, 7
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 2, 4, 5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1, 2, 5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    3, 5, 6
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    2, 4, 6, 7
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1, 3, 4, 5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    Core text:

    Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. 2014, Marsh's Becoming a Teacher (6th, ed.), Pearson Education Australia: NSW, Frenchs Forest.

    This text will also be used during other courses in the degree program.  There is also an online version which is a little cheaper.  Either version is fine..

    Online Reading Materials:

    Some course reading materials will be posted in MyUni.  This will include links to contemporary issues as they occur.  Students are also welcome to submit links, but please do so via the Course Coordinator, Dr Linda Westphalen.
    Recommended Resources
    These resources are optional. 

    The following practical texts are useful resources that will be valuable for future classroom planning and teaching.

    Ground-Water, S., Ewing, R., & Le Cornu., (2015). Teaching Challenges and Dilemmas (5th Ed.), Cengage Learning Australia: South Melbourne.

    Frangenheim, E. (2005). Reflections on Classroom Thinking Strategies, Rodin Educational Consultancy: Queensland.
    Online Learning

    Course information, rubrics and all other course materials plus associated lecture resources are all on MyUni/Canvas. 

    Online delivery of lectures is scheduled to take place from 2-3pm on Mondays.  A zoom link will be provided for students and it is highly recommended that you 'attend' these lectures as they occur.  Lectures will be uploaded to MyUni soon after they are delivered.

    The second lecture scheduled (3-4pm on Mondays) is for discussion and announcements, but predominantly for online activities.  Online activities are essentially preparation for the Tutorials and for your broader professional development. 

    Tutorials are scheduled to take place face to face.  Please note that attendance is compulsory and that a role will be taken. 

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The primary teaching modes for this course are lecture, online activities and tutorial, with the first and second offered via zoom at a scheduled time and the third offered face to face on campus across the week.  Students are expected to attend and participate in all tutorials and these will include small group discussion, activities and individual exercises. 

    Please note that work commitments are not an acceptable excuse for failing to attend tutorials.  These are a key part of your learning as a professional teacher. 

    If you are unable to attend your scheduled tutorial, please provide evidence of sickness or other valid reason for absence: otherwise non-attendance will be counted as absence for assessment purposes.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The following time commitment is assumed.  Please note that these times are approximate and for guidance only.

    Lecture attendance (online): 12 weeks x 2 hours = 24 hours

    Tutorial attendance  (f2f): 12 weeks x 1 = 12 hours

    Reading and Preparation for Tutorials: 12 weeks x 3 hours = 36 hours

    Assessments: Podcast = 3 hours;
                          Well-being Quiz = 1 hour;
                          Paired Presentation = 45 hours;
                          Wellbeing Lesson and Justification = 35 hours.

    Total approximate time for assessments = 84 hours.

    Overall Time Commitment (approx) = 156 hours.

    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Lecture Topic Learning Outcomes APST (Graduate)
    Week 1 Teaching as a Complex Profession.  1 - 7 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4.
    Week 2 Teaching for Effective Learning (TFEL) and Reflective Practices in Lesson sequencing 1, 4 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, 2.6, 3.2, 3.4, 3.7, 4.1, 4.4, 4.5,  6.1, 6.3, 7.1, 7.2.
    Week 3 Wellbeing 1 2, 3 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 7.3, 7.4.
    Week 4 Wellbeing 2 2, 3 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 7.3, 7.4.
    Week 5 Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum: ICT focus 2, 4 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.4, 2.6, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 6.4, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4.
    Week 6 Inclusion: National Declarations for Educational Goals (from Hobart to Uluru). 1, 5, 6 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2, 3.4, 3.5, 3.7, 4.1, 4.4, 4.5, 5.5, 6.3, 6.4, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4.
    Week 7 First Nations: Issues impacting on Educational Outcomes 1, 2, 5, 6 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.3, 5.5, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4.
    Week 8 Abilities/Diff-abilities:  diverse learning strategies for diverse learning needs 1, 2, 4 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.6, 3.2, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4.
    Week 9 Gifted and Struggling students: Pedagogic Strategies for Inclusion across abilities. 2, 5 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.4, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 5.3, 5.5, 6.1, 6.2, 6.4, 7.3, 7.4.
    Week 10 Learning Theory: Key Ideas underpinning pedagogy 1, 3, 6, 7 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4, 6.3, 7.1, 7.2.
    Week 11 The lesson: Planning for Inclusion and wellbeing 1, 2, 7 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4.
    Week 12 Parents/carers: Reporting outcomes, including the diverse community 1 - 7 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.2,
    3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4,
    5.5, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4.
     
    Specific Course Requirements
    This course is designed to build on your current knowledge of Teaching and to prepare for future learning and Professional Experiences in future courses.  Attendance and engagement are essential for you to gain the most out of the course.  Please be aware that, while every opportunity has been taken to anticipate possible COVID-related lockdowns, modifications may need to be made in the event that the University must again go into a 'work from home' scenario.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Small Group Discovery Experiences are developed around specific tutorial content which require students to engage as early career professionals working in teams.  These are done under the supervision of experienced teachers.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Learning Outcome APST (Graduate)
    Video Podcast formative 20%
    2, 7
    1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 6.1, 6.2, 7.3, 7.4.


    Pairs Presentation via youtube or equivalent
    Summative


    30%


    1, 2, 3, 5
    1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.3, 5.5, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4.
    Wellbeing Quiz Summative 10%
    2, 3, 4

    1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.3, 5.5, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4.
    Wellbeing Lesson Plan
    Inclusion focus
    Summative 30%
    1, 3, 4, 6, 7
    1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4, 6.1, 6.3, 7.1, 7.2.
    Participation: Self Appraisal Summative 10% 1 - 7 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4, 6.1, 6.3, 7.1, 7.2.
     






    Assessment Related Requirements
    Please submit all assignments via MyUni.  If you have technical issues, please email Linda Westphalen or your tutor immediately to trouble shoot or organise an alternative submission.  Late submissions will accrue a deduction of 2% per day to a maximum of 7 days (including weekends and public holidays) in keeping with the Faculty of Arts Late Assignment Policy.  
    Assessment Detail
    1. Video Podcast (20%)

    A 'podcast' is a 'Product On Demand broadCAST'.  In this case it will be a video podcast, or a short film of you speaking 'to camera' about your perspectives on a topic.  The best way to do this is using your iPad to create an MP4 which you can upload to YouTube or Box.  You then simply upload a shareable link to MyUni as your assignment submission.

    The Podcast is also so that you can:
    - introduce yourself to your tutor;
    - practice using your iPad for the Video Presentation which is the next assignment;
    - have a record of you 'in action' for your ePortfolio;
    - get used to thinking like a teacher in relation to helping those students who, for whatever reason, need support for their learning.

    Here's the scenario:  You're applying for a job in a country school as a teacher in one of your subject area specialisations and the Principal is unable to meet with you in person.  They ask that you record a podcast about one of the key cultural groups at the school as part of your application.  Assume that you've finished your Bachelor of Teaching and other degree successfully and have done very well in your Practicum reports.  This is your first ever teaching job.

    The school is located in a regional area and has a significant First Nations and migrant student profile, which together make up about 40% of the school's total population.  Of this 40%, about half are from the local First Nations group.  Of the migrant group, half are from Afghanistan while the others are from Myanmar.  There will be other cultural differences, but let's stick to these for now.

    You must:

    1. Dress in professional attire suitable for a job interview.  This usually means something fairly formal (eg. wearing a tie).  In teaching, as with many professions, your appearance is a reflection of the school's image to the public.  Also it's a job interview: these will be a reality very shortly!

    2.  Address the following content:
          a: Your name, qualifications and subject area specialisations in a brief introduction.
          b: Find out a little about these cultural groups.  Pick one and identify 2 - 3 key cultural differences to 'mainstream' Australia.
          c: How might these differences impact on students' wellbeing and abilities to learn?
          d: What ideas (3 - 5) do you have about helping these students to learn while they're in one of your subject area classes? 
          e: Outline why these strategies would  be helpful.

    Note: Don't try to do more than one of First Nations, Afghani or Sudanese cultural groups.  Do choose one of your subject area
    specialisations.  Please be very wary of stereotypes about these cultural groups.  Remember, you are there to teach everyone.

    You don't, at this point, have to have anything based in theory or pedagogical practice.  This is simply you exercising your common sense to help students in your class to feel included and engage with learning.  It's a chance to think about yourself as a practitioner and not a uni student.

    The minimum time for the submission is 2 minutes.  The maximum is 2 minutes 30 seconds.  If you refer to someone else's research please include a reference in the 'Notes' section of MyUni.  Our assessment and feedback will be by using a 'return' podcast, as well as via an associated rubric in MyUni.


    2. Pairs presentation via YouTube (or similar) (30%)

    Pick one of the issues from the list below and, in pairs, create a documentary video about this issue.  You are welcome to refine the issue to something specific: for example, you might want to address student diversity with a particular focus on Gifted students.   If you want to do something else of particular interest to you that is not covered by the course, that's fine, but check in with your tutor before beginning so we can ensure you're still doing the same kind of research around the task and not attempting something too big or small.

    Issues List
    Homework
    Gender identity and/or sexuality
    Streaming
    Exams and high stakes testing
    First Nations: culturally inclusive pedagogies
    Migrant students - language and/or culture
    Geographical isolation (stick to Australia, please.)
    Technology
    Religious Education
    Muslim student experiences (not Afghanistan or Myanmar)
    Diff-ability (eg. Dyslexia, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Attention Deficit Disorder, physical mobility, psychological well-being or
    something else).

    Also remember that while you're pretty new to the profession of teaching, your opinions and ideas are important.  Not all experienced teachers are wise and/or innovative.  Many teachers really enjoy working with student teachers because of the fresh 'take' they bring to teaching.  By the same token, not all new teachers are wise and/or innovative either!

    Many teachers use YouTube and other social media to create and deliver content for their students.  Recorded content means that you don't have to spend endless hours repeating the same story over and over, and it means that you have a resource that should be useful for a couple of years.

    Your video should address the following:
    a: A brief outline of the issue - what is it?  What is its history? Is there any science around it?  (eg. Giftedness has quite a lot of
    theoretical background:  be careful to be selective and current with your outcomes here.)
    b: How does the topic relate to the Australian  Professional Standards for Teachers (Graduate level)?  Suggest up to 5
    of the 37 standards.
    c: How does this issue impact on student well-being and learning?  Does it have any impacts on teachers' well-being?  (This bit is where you really need to drill into impact. eg. A gifted student who is not fostered is likely to be very frustrated and bored - and this can have a detrimental affect on more than just them.)
    d: What strategies have been used by teachers and schools to address this issue? (Again, keep it current.  Historical perspectives
    that are debunked are not much use to current teachers, and you're going to be current teachers.)
    e: Have they worked? Why/why not? (Hint: Remember that schools are much more than about academic outcomes). 
    f: Do you have any ideas about what would work better/differently?  (Get creative here: Brainstorm like mad!  This is where you can suggest all sorts of strategies, many of which many registered teachers won't have considered.

    The video will be between 6 minutes and 7 minutes long and include BOTH students as presenters.  Each student will be marked individually on their contribution.  Each is expected to share the load in the research and creation of the video.  The mark for the video itself will be shared.

    Please use any/all of the following:

    Voiceover
    Music
    Links to other information (note that these will not be counted in the time
    duration).
    Variations in type of shot (Close up, upper body 'newsreader', etc.)
    Graphics
    Interactivity (links, online quizzes, games)
    Anything else you can creatively employ, provided it doesn't go over the time limit.

    References in APA form should be included in the final slide.

    Upload your video to MyUni or provide a shareable link.


    3. Wellbeing Quiz (10%)


    In the 'Wellbeing' focus of the course, there is a short quiz.  After doing the online tasks, complete the quiz. 


    4. Wellbeing Lesson Plan and Justification


    Using a provided template based on Gagne's Nine Instructional Events (Gagne, R. (1985). The Conditions of Learning (4th). New York, Holt, Rinehart and Winston), create a lesson plan with an inclusion focus. 

    The Nine Events of Instruction is a pretty old resource, but it is a key planning guide that is still used by many teachers.  It has the advantage of providing a very clear, step by step sequence which is really helpful for those who are new to lesson planning.  

    Once you've planned your lesson, create a Word/Pages document of about 500 words that explains and justifies your approach in this lesson.  This, and the lesson, will be assessed using a rubric in MyUni.

    Why a lesson plan?  Lesson planning is a core skill for teachers - it's something that you will spend a lot of time doing.  The more that you plan, (usually) the better the lesson and the better your get at planning.  You will need to pay particular attention to lesson planning as you do more and more Professional Experiences:  this is especially true of the longer PEs in 4th year.

    Why Wellbeing?  Wellbeing is a pivotal focus of this course.  If you think about it, so many issues to do with Education have at their core the wellbeing of students, teachers and the community.  In EDUC 2002, there is a 10 day Professional Experience which has a focus on wellbeing.  This assignment is thus geared to prepare you for this PE focus.  In other words, in EDUC 2001 you deal with a key issue in teaching (Wellbeing) as well as start to plan ahead for your PE in EDUC 2002.
    Submission

    Everything is to be submitted online via MyUni.  In the event of extreme technological failure, alternative submisions may be considered.  In this event, please email your tutor as soon as possible. 

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.