ANTH 2037 - Anthropology of Emotion, Mind and Person

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2015

Issues of what it is to be a thinking, feeling, knowing person are central to anthropology. Anthropology has, throughout its history, provided a unique and powerful focus on the mind, body and person in their total social and cultural context. This course explores different disciplinary perspectives on emotion, mind and person, while highlighting the distinctive methodological and theoretical tasks of anthropological explanation. Specific topics covered will include cross-cultural understandings of emotion, grief and mental illness; debates on the role of language in perception; and altered states of consciousness such as dreaming, trance and possession. The course culminates in an exploration of anthropological perspectives on what it is to be a person, using ethnographic and cross-cultural comparisons to reflect upon individuality, agency and power.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ANTH 2037
    Course Anthropology of Emotion, Mind and Person
    Coordinating Unit Anthropology and Development Studies
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of level 1 Arts courses
    Incompatible ANTH 2023 or ANTH 3023
    Course Description Issues of what it is to be a thinking, feeling, knowing person are central to anthropology. Anthropology has, throughout its history, provided a unique and powerful focus on the mind, body and person in their total social and cultural context. This course explores different disciplinary perspectives on emotion, mind and person, while highlighting the distinctive methodological and theoretical tasks of anthropological explanation. Specific topics covered will include cross-cultural understandings of emotion, grief and mental illness; debates on the role of language in perception; and altered states of consciousness such as dreaming, trance and possession. The course culminates in an exploration of anthropological perspectives on what it is to be a person, using ethnographic and cross-cultural comparisons to reflect upon individuality, agency and power.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Rodney Lucas

    Course Coordinator: Dr Rod Lucas
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    1 Recognise elements of the anthropological study of mind, consciousness, emotion and personhood
    2 Develop an understanding of key concepts in the long history of anthropological enquiry into these topics
    3 Distinguish different disciplinary approaches to these topics
    4 Become familiar with anthropological literature, analytic frameworks and research methods in relation to these topics
    5 Demonstrate an ability to think critically and analytically about these topics
    6 Better understand contemporary Western knowledge and practice as cultural phenomena
    7 Locate notions of emotion, mind and person in our own society and our own lives, and to think more deeply and analytically about that social location
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2, 3
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 3, 4,5
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 6
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 5
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 7
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 5, 6
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 6, 7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There is a Reading Book for this course.  It will be available for purchase online, with collection from the Image and Copy Centre, Level 1, Hughes Building at the start of semester.  The Reading Book consists of a copy of the Course Outline and the essential readings for each tutorial week as listed in the course structure.

    Most of these essential readings will also be available via electronic links in MyUni (subject to copyright).
    PowerPoint slides and audio tapes of lectures will be available through MyUni.
    Recommended Resources
    For those who wish to read beyond the essential reading for each week or for use in developing and researching assignments, supplementary readings will be suggested for each week's topic.  These will be listed in the detailed Course Outline and some will be available through MyUni (subject to copyright).

    Please see Helen Attar, Research Librarian for Anthropology, for further enquiries about anthropological sources online and in the library. Contact details: tel: 8313 5345; email: helen.attar@adelaide.edu.au.
    Online Learning
    Lectures will be recorded each week and made available on MyUni.  Lecture PowerPoints and additional notes or references will also be made available on MyUni after the relevant lecture.  The PowerPoints slides will likely only refer to the main points or issues raised in the lectures and are not a substitute for attending lectures. 

    Folders will be set up in MyUni for weekly ePosts which provide a place for students to respond to readings and engage with each other in discussion and debate.  These will form a part of course assessment.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures are an essential part of the course, providing the background, theoretical tools and ethnographic material central to the topic. They will be complementary to the tutorials and will not necessarily cover the same ground. Seminars provide an opportunity to expand on some of the material in lectures, and to further explore and debate aspects of the week's topic via students' own experiences and small group discovery.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 1-hour lecture (or equivalent) per week 12 hours per semester
    1 x 2-hour seminar (or equivalent) per week 24 hours per semester
    6 hours reading per week 72 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week 24 hours per semester
    2 hours assignment preparation per week 24 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Introduction
    Week 2 Mind and Society: Conceptualising the Relationship
    Week 3 Debates on Language and Perception
    Week 4 Consciousness, Altered Consciousness, Trance & Possession
    Week 5 Mind, Body & Phenomenology
    Week 6 Problematic Minds: a cross-cultural case study of schizophrenia
    Week 7 Culture & Personality: the case of Bali
    Week 8 Emotion, culture & the body
    Week 9 Emotion: Managing Hearts
    Week 10 Body and/of emotion
    Week 11 Ego-centric and socio-centric personhood
    Week 12 Being a ‘person’: the beginnings and ends of life
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Students will have the opportunity to work with each other in small groups (usually 2-4 persons) to research and present to fellow students materials relating to the focus topic for a particular week.  These groups will work toward providing a context for a broader discussion that will take place across the whole workshop group, following a presentation.  Students working in this way are encouraged to be creative: to bring their own insights and knowledge to the topic, to go beyond the basic readings, and to find their own materials.  Broader research and egagement will be rewarded in assessment.  Small student groups will also engage each other through a range of activities including quizzes, role plays, demonstrations, discussions and debates.



  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Course Learning Outcome
    Seminar participation Formative and Summative 10% 1
    Seminar presentation Formative and Summative 20% 2, 3, 4
    5 x e-posts Formative and Summative 10% 4, 5
    1500 word research proposal Formative and Summative 20% 1, 3, 4, 5
    2500 word research essay  Summative 40% 5, 6, 7
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Seminar Participation
    Failure to attend more than 2 seminars without adequate documentation (eg a medical or counselling certificate) will result in 0% for the participation mark.

    Seminar Presentation
    All students are required to engage actively in the learning of others in their seminar group.  This is achieved principally through small group discovery learning in which students work with 1, 2, or 3 other participants to explore a set of issues and questions related to the topic for that week (see 'Learning Activities Summary' above).
    Assessment Detail
    Seminar Participation:  Students will be evaluated on their familiarity with the required readings, their preparation for and leadership in discussions, their role in group presentations, and their general class participation. The participation mark is not simply a numeric rendering of how many workshops a student has attended.  All students are expected to participate in seminar discussions and to act professionally throughout the semester, which includes regularly attending class, arriving to class on time, and being respectful to all seminar members - 10% weighting.

    Seminar Presentation: Basic elements of a presentation include: a clear, concise summary of the topic(s) raised by the reading materials; discussion of why it might be an interesting/relevant/important topic to study; highlight what you’ve learned from the materials – what was interesting, challenging or difficult - 20% weighting.

    ePosts: Each posting should be a short (c.150-200 words) but coherent paragraph that follows one of two formats:
    1) Close reading: Identify a passage from one of the readings that either interests and excites you, or annoys and frustrates you; briefly explain how or why it does so; and pose a question that might help move discussion forward to follow your inspiration, or address your frustration.
    2) Context: Write a short paragraph situating the week’s readings within the context of the course as a whole: what new elements do they bring to the topic? Which previous readings do they build upon, which do they forget? How do they speak to themes emerging in class discussion?
    Individual postings will not be graded, but the number from each student will be recorded and a grade assigned accordingly (2% x 5 = 10% of total grade).  ePosts may be further used in seminars to precipitate or expand upon discussions and debates.

    1500 word Research proposal: comprising the (working) title of the proposed project, a 500 word summary outlining the basic details of the project, and an annotated bibliography - 20% weighting.
     
    2500 research essay: an essay based on each student's research and research proposal - 40% weighting.

    Submission
    All assignments must be submitted electronically via MyUni as a PDF file.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.
  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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