EDUC 7010 - Innovations in Teaching, Learning and Assessment

North Terrace Campus - Summer - 2014

The aim of the topic is to familiarise students with emerging technologies, and the theoretical, pedagogical and research-based evidence for decision making on optimising learning and enhancing teaching. The topic seeks to highlight the pertinent nexus between teaching, learning, assessment and research. This topic consists of a negotiated, inter-/trans-disciplinary and school-based project that results in creation of a Reflections Portfolio and the design and implementation of a practical (trial and evaluated) unit of work. Interoperability, portability and standards issues will be examined and discussed.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code EDUC 7010
    Course Innovations in Teaching, Learning and Assessment
    Coordinating Unit School of Education
    Term Summer
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 2.5 hours per week
    Restrictions Available to M Ed students only
    Course Description The aim of the topic is to familiarise students with emerging technologies, and the theoretical, pedagogical and research-based evidence for decision making on optimising learning and enhancing teaching. The topic seeks to highlight the pertinent nexus between teaching, learning, assessment and research. This topic consists of a negotiated, inter-/trans-disciplinary and school-based project that results in creation of a Reflections Portfolio and the design and implementation of a practical (trial and evaluated) unit of work. Interoperability, portability and standards issues will be examined and discussed.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Francisco Ben

    Name: Dr. Francis Ben (Rm 825)
    Location: Level 8, 10 Pulteney Street
    Telephone: Office – 8313 5631
    Email: francisco.ben@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Website: www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    This course consists of 15 sessions. Sessions are held from Tuesday to Thursday (for 5 weeks) from 1 – 3 PM in the Hughes Building Room 323.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    2.1 COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    2.1.1. Knowledge and Understanding
    2.1.1.1. This course aims to present information on a range of emerging innovations in education, including the issues and implications associated with them. It highlights the theoretical underpinnings of the concept of ‘Innovation’. Within the Australian education context, how innovations will impact on the AITSL Australian professional standards for teachers will be of central focus. It also aims to familiarise students on the theoretical, pedagogical and research-based evidence for decision making on optimising learning and enhancing teaching.

    2.1.1.2. This course aims to develop an increased awareness of the current local and global trends in innovations in education particularly on the findings of research studies on different technological innovations adopted for use in teaching and learning, including assessment. Furthermore, this course seeks to highlight the pertinent nexus between teaching, learning, assessment and research.

    2.1.1.3. This course will encourage students to translate theory into practice in one or more issues that they can utilise in their own teaching. A number of emerging innovations, namely cognitive neuroscience, reflective practice, inquiry and problem-based learning, will be examined.

    2.1.1.4. This course will contribute to participants’ capacity to examine education-related studies and draw conclusions for everyday practice. In addition, the course will enable participants to integrate research findings from a number of disciplines such as psychology, sociology, measurement, history, and studies of curriculum in various subject areas.

    2.1.1.5. Participants in the course will contribute to developing the capacity to write essays on education-related topics, which are both clear and demonstrate a high level of understanding. The course will also contribute to the development of the participants’ capacity to begin the planning of Web design containing information about ‘Future Schools’, and the ability to apply education research in an international context.

    2.1.1.6. The course will contribute to students’ capacity to share and collaborate with fellow students, and an awareness and expertise in the collaborative practices of teachers with each other and with the broader educational community.

    2.1.2. Communication Skills
    The continuing development of good inter-personal and communication skills is widely recognised as important for all graduates.

    2.1.2.1. This course specifically seeks to develop students’ abilities to discuss issues in a workshop environment. This allows for group, collaborative and individual responses.

    2.1.2.2. Show critical thinking and reflection through group interaction, oral and written presentations.


    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 2.1.1.1 – 2.1.1.4
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2.1.1.3, 2.1.1.4
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 2.1.1.3, 2.1.1.4, 2.1.1.5, 2.1.2.1, 2.1.2.2
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 2.1.2.1, 2.1.2.2
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2.1.1.4, 2.1.1.5
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 2.1.1.2, 2.1.1.4, 2.1.2
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 2.1.1, 2.1.2
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 2.1.1.3, 2.1.1.4, 2.1.2
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There is no required textbook. A set of readers will be provided to students. However, students are encouraged to look for readings related to the topic which could possibly be more up to date than the ones provided.
    Recommended Resources
    Module 1: Innovation and Schools of the Future

    1. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) (2007) The Starter Pack: Future Thinking in Action, Paris: OECD Publishing
    – Part II: What is shaping the future of schooling: Trends and their implication in education
    2. Rogers, E.M. (1995) Diffusion of innovation, 4th Ed., New York: The Free Press
    – Chapters 1,5,6,7
    3. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) (2000) Innovating Schools, Paris: OECD Publishing
    – Chapters 3, 4
    4. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) (2007) The Starter Pack: Future Thinking in Action, Paris: OECD Publishing – Part III: What might schooling look like in the future?: Scenarios for further reflection

    Additional readings

    1. A Primer in Diffusion of Innovations Theory
    http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/SOS/InnDiff.html
    2. The AIS Special Interest Group on Adoption and Diffusion of Information Technology
    http://www.sigadit.org/
    3. A number of additional web links on DOI
    http://www.personal.psu.edu/staff/c/a/cam240/litreview.htm,
    4. The Adelaide Declaration on National Goals for Schooling in the Twenty-first Century - Preamble and Goals
    http://www.dest.gov.au/sectors/school_education/policy_initiatives_reviews/national_goals_for_schooling_in_the_twenty_first_century.htm
    5. Queensland: Tomorrow's Schools - Providing for a Smarter Future
    http://education.qld.gov.au/strategic/accountability/tomorrow.html
    6. DECS: Schooling for Tomorrow
    http://www.dest.gov.au/sectors/school_education/programmes_funding/programme_categories/key_priorities/schooling_for_tomorrow.htm#Information_on_Victorian_and_South_Australian_initiatives

    Module 2: Teaching and Learning Revisited

    1. Savery, J. R. and Duffy, T.M. (1995) Problem Based Learning: An instructional model and its constructivist framework In B. Wilson (Ed.). Constructivist Learning Environments: Case Studies in Instructional Design, NJ: Educational Technology Publications Englewood Cliffs.
    2. Smith, T.W. and Colby, S.A. (2007) Teaching for Deep Learning, The Clearing House, 80(5), 205-210.
    3. Shayer, M. and Adey, P. (2002) Learning Intelligence: Cognitive Acceleration across the curriculum from 5 to 15 years, Buckingham: Open University Press
    4. Phuong-Mai, N., Terlouw, C., & Pilot, A. (Oct 2005). Cooperative learning vs Confucian heritage culture's collectivism: confrontation to reveal some cultural conflicts and mismatch. Asia Europe Journal; Intercultural Studies in the Social Sciences and Humanities, 3, 3. 403-419.
    5. Byrne, M. (2004). Student co-researchers. Academic Exchange Quarterly, 8(3). p.75-80.
    6. Bassoppo-Moyo, T C (Wntr 2006). Evaluating eLearning: a front-end, process and post hoc approach. International Journal of Instructional Media, 33, 1. 7-22
    7. Department for Education and Skills (DfES) (2004), Pedagogy and Practice: Teaching and Learning in Secondary Schools, UK: Crown
    – Unit 19: Learning Styles

    Additional readings

    1. Explorations in Learning & Instruction: The Theory Into Practice Database
    http://tip.psychology.org/
    2. The online workplace of an international community of education professionals.
    http://tappedin.org/tappedin/
    3. Teaching and Learning Models and Approaches
    http://www.bbk.ac.uk/ccs/elearn/teach_and_learn_models.htm
    4. Teaching and Learning: Methods and Strategies
    http://www.ic.arizona.edu/ic/edtech/strategy.html
    5. About Learning
    http://www.funderstanding.com/about_learning.cfm
    6. Learning Theories
    http://www.emtech.net/learning_theories.htm
    7. Alternative Modes of Teaching and Learning
    http://www.csd.uwa.edu.au/altmodes/

    Module 3: Assessment: Where is the Learning? Evidence-based Approaches

    1. Shepard, L.A. (2000) The Role of Assessment in a Learning Culture. Educational Researcher, 29, 7. pp. 4-14.
    2. Department for Education and Skills (DfES) (2004), Pedagogy and Practice: Teaching and Learning in Secondary Schools, UK: Crown
    – Unit 12: Assessment for Learning
    3. Gregory, K. and Clarke, M. (2003) High-Stakes Assessment in England and Singapore, Theory into Practice, 42(1), 66-87
    4. Keeves, J.P. and Alagumalai, S. (1999) New Approaches to Measurement In Advances in G.N. Masters and J.P. Keeves (eds), Measurement and Educational Research and Assessment, pp. 23-42
    5. Ripley, M. (2007) Futurelab Series, Report 10 Update: E-assessment – an update on research, policy and practice, Bristol, UK:Futurelab

    Additional readings

    1. Teaching, Learning, and Assessment Guide
    http://www.ltag.education.tas.gov.au/
    2. Assessment for Learning
    http://cms.curriculum.edu.au/assessment/default.asp
    3. Assessment
    http://www.lts.rmit.edu.au/renewal/assess/index.htm
    4. On-line Assessment
    http://www.cshe.unimelb.edu.au/assessinglearning/03/online.html
    5. Assessment Resource Banks: English, Mathematics and Science
    http://arb.nzcer.org.nz/nzcer3/nzcer.htm

    Module 4: ICT integration

    1. MCEETY. (2005). Pedagogy Strategy: Learning in an online world. Melbourne: Curriculum Corporation.
    2. Sourin, A., Sourina, O., & Prasolova-Forland, E. (Oct-Dec 2006). Cyber-learning in cyberworlds. Journal of Cases on Information Technology, 8, 4. p.55-70.
    3. Khine, M. S. (Spring 2006). Strategic use of digital learning resources in designing e-Lessons. International Journal of Instructional Media, 33, 2. p.127-134.
    4. Hew, K. F., & Cheung, W. S. (Summer 2003). Evaluating the participation and quality of thinking of pre-service teachers in an asynchronous online discussion environment: Part I. International Journal of Instructional Media, 30, 3. p.247-263.
    5. Hew, K. F., & Cheung, W. S. (Summer 2003). Evaluating the participation and quality of thinking of pre-service teachers in an asynchronous online discussion environment: Part II. International Journal of Instructional Media, 30, 4. p.355-366.
    6. Klein, C., & Partridge, J F (Spring 2003). Transnational conversations: a Web pedagogy. Academic Exchange Quarterly, 7, 1. p.282-287.
    7. Edmundson, A L (April-June 2005). The cross-cultural dimensions of globalized e-learning. International Journal of Information and Communication Technology Education, 1, 2. p.47-61.
    8. Mokhtar, I. A. (April 2005). Education in the information age--a preliminary study of the changing roles of school teachers in Singapore. Educational Research for Policy and Practice, 4, 1. p.27-45
    9. Ang, K.-C. , & Lee, P.-Y. (Feb 2007). The influence of technology on the teaching and learning of mathematics in Singapore. Electronic Journal of Mathematics and Technology, 1, 1. p.79(6).
    10. SeokHoon, A. S. (Annual 2003). Promoting IT in childhood education: how Singapore prepares for a different future. Childhood Education, 79, 5. p.283-286.
    11. Lim, C. P., & Khine, M. S. (Spring 2006). Managing teachers' barriers to ICT integration in Singapore schools. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 14, 1. p.97-125.
    12. Kickul, G., & Kickul, J. (July-Sept 2006). Closing the gap: impact of student proactivity and learning goal orientation on e-learning outcomes. International Journal on E-Learning, 5, 3. p.361-372
    13. Passerini, K. (Summer 2007). Performance and behavioral outcomes in technology-supported learning: the role of interactive multimedia. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 16, 2. p.183-211.

    Additional readings

    1. enGauge 21st Century Skills
    http://www.ncrel.org/engauge/skills/skills.htm
    2. Integrating ICT into Classroom teaching
    http://www.ictintegration.co.uk/
    3. Resources to support ICT integration
    http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/technology/6-9.htm
    4. LAMS International
    http://www.lamsinternational.com/
    5. How to choose a Learning Management System
    http://community.flexiblelearning.net.au/ManagingFlexibleDelivery/content/article_6944.htm

    Module 5: Learning Environment & Edutainment

    1. Resnick, L.B. (1987) The 1987 Presidential Address: Learning in School and out. Educational Researcher, 16, 9, pp. 13-20+54.
    2. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) (2006) 21st Century Learning Environment, Paris: OECD Publishing
    3. Egenfeldt-Nielsen, S. (Fall 2007). Third generation educational use of computer games.(Report). Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 16, 3. p.263-281.
    4. Kirriemuir, J., Ceangal, McFarlane, A.. (2007) Futurelab Series, Report 8: Literature Review in Games and Learning, Bristol, UK:Futurelab

    Additional readings

    1. 33 Principles of Educational Design
    http://schoolstudio.engr.wisc.edu/33principles.html
    2. Design Share: Designing for the Future of Learning
    http://www.designshare.com/default.asp
    3. Essential Resources for school change
    http://www.essentialschools.org/
    4. School Redesign Network
    http://schoolredesign.net/
    5. School Design Research Studio
    http://schoolstudio.engr.wisc.edu/index.html
    6. Small School project
    http://www.smallschoolsproject.org/
    7. Designing spaces for effective learning
    http://www.jisc.ac.uk/eli_learningspaces.html
    8. Stimulating & Secure Learning Environment
    http://www.sofweb.vic.edu.au/blueprint/es/environment.htm
    Online Learning
    Any lecture notes/PowerPoint slides will be available on MyUni (See the address on the front of this document). In addition, links to online resources such as topic-related journal articles and multimedia materials will also be posted on MyUni. The MyUni Discussion Board will be utilized for online student discussion. Moreover, public social/collaborative networking sites (e.g. Edmodo and Dropbox) will also be examined and utilized.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    TEACHING & LEARNING MODES
    The complete course will be delivered by holding 15 2-hour seminars/workshops
    (see Course Planner https://access.adelaide.edu.au/courses/search.asp ).

    Seminars/workshops are an important component of your learning in this course. The communication skills developed in seminars by regularly and actively participating in discussions are considered to be most important by the School and are highly regarded by employers and professional bodies.

    The course lecturer will be available for face-to-face consultation from 11 AM – 12 noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Please email for appointment.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The University expects full-time students (i.e. those taking 12 units per semester) to devote a total of 48 hours per week to their studies. A subject worth 2 points, therefore, should take 8 hours (incl 2 hours of formal classes) during the teaching weeks of the course. Students in this course are expected to attend at least 80% of all lectures/seminars throughout the summer semester. There are no tutorial sessions for this course Please refer to Access Adelaide for your timetable and enrolment details. http://www.adelaide.edu.au/access/.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Module Topics/Contents                             Readings Extension Readings
    ONE
    (28 Jan - 13 Feb)
    Introduction
    Assessments and Requirements
    Introduction to MyUni UoA Library
    What is shaping the future of education, training and schooling?*
    Learning Environments of the Future project
    Form the groups*

    *[1]

    Creativity, Innovation and Inventive
    Thinking
    Diffusion of Innovations
    [2] [5,6,7]
    Innovating Schools, training organizations and educational institutions
    The OECD schooling/education scenarios
    [3] [4]
    Learning Outcomes
    Skills for the future
    Innovation in Schools and Educational Institutions
    [8,9,10]
    Learning Theory and Instructional Design
    Teaching for deep learning Cognitive Acceleration Collaborative learning
    Students as Co-Researchers Modes of Teaching/Learning Styles
    [11]
    [12]
    [13]
    [14]
    [15
    ] [16,17]
    [18,19,20,21,22,23,24]
    Assessment
    CTT and IRT e-assessment
    Assessment CTT and IRT
    e-assessment
    [30,31,32]
    [28]
    [33,34]
    TWO
    (18 Feb - 27 Feb)
    ICT and Education
    E-Learning
    21st Century Skills [EnGauge]
    [35,36,37] [38,39] [48] [40,41,42,43,44,
    45,46,47,49,50]
      Learning Activities Management Systems (LAMS)
    Course Management Systems (CMS)
    Resource [Item] Banking, Archives and Portals [Education]
    [51] [52] [34]
      Innovative learning spaces [53] [54] [57,58,59,60,61,62,63,64]
      Learning Environment of the Future
    Group Presentation
      What can we learn from games?
    Revisit T-L-A Nexus and the value of Research. Enduring Understanding – The nexus to Research Recap / Close /Evaluation

    [55]
    [56]
    Specific Course Requirements
    There are no additional course-specific requirements.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    It is assumed that most of the students who enrol in this course do not have substantial experience in creating a (research-based) website/webpages.  By collaborativey working in small groups, students will have a first hand experience/discovery of how websites are 'written' or developed.  In addition, students will have the experience of collaboratively thinking about an idea of 'school of of the future' and how they will translate this into a website form.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT SUMMARY
    There are two assignments (both summative) required for this course. It will be in the form of an illustrative design of educational environment of the future completed individually or collaboratively in small groups, and individually in the form of a negotiated essay topic on innovations and their implementation for teaching, learning and assessment.
    Assessment Related Requirements
    At least 50% (Pass) must be obtained for each assignment in order to achieve an overall PASS in this course.
    Assessment Detail
    Assignment 1 20% Presentation (I) + 20% Web Design(G)
    Educational Environment of the Future (Individual/Group)
    (Graduate Attributes 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)

    In collaborative groups you will design a learning environment that matches attributes you will define to prepare our youth in schools or your adult clients in the 21st century. Using current technologies you will interact with team members, experts, and your lecturers through the Internet. Research, data collection and posting of work will be carried out online.

    In groups, you will initially be involved in designing a productive learning environment for your students/clients of the future. Through the development of the future learning environments, you and your team will be involved in learning various aspects of educational environment for the future and best use of technology for engaging the learner, as well as have the opportunity to design your vision. You will ‘showcase’ your ‘School of the Future’ on the Internet. Hence, you will need to design a website. Your website will contain all the necessary information about your school’s learning environment, thus providing prospective parents and students a good insight of what the school can deliver using contemporary innovations in teaching, learning and assessment.

    Use your research to justify and support the vision of your learning environment.

    You will present your project in Module Two of this course.

    You may use any available software to develop your website (PHP [if you know HTML coding], Publisher, Dreamweaver, Google Sites, etc.). You may present your School of the Future as a stand-alone, ready-to-go-live website, or you may use free-to-use web-clients such as Google. You may spice up a little your presentation using a web-based slides presentation tool such as Prezi. Compatibility of your website to all web-browser platforms is not necessary

    Due Date: 20 February 2014
    Criteria for assessment will be discussed in class.

    Assignment 2 (Graduate Attributes 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9) 60%
    Essay - Innovations and implementation for T/L/A (Individual)
    (~2500 - 3000 words)

    You are required to write an essay on any of the innovations we have discussed in class. It will be useful to draw upon your own experience as a teacher, trainer or educational consultant and the area or subject you have taught [or may be currently teaching]. You may want to start with what the ‘traditional practices’ were and why you think they may not optimize learning. It will be useful to draw from the resources distributed in class, as well as any further readings you may have undertaken beyond distributed articles.

    Due Date: 27 February 2014

    RUBRICS

    Learning Environment of the Future
    5 4 3  2  1
    Content
    Readings (x2) Strong evidence of independent reading beyond required text and distributed articles Evidence of reading beyond required text and distributed articles Evidence of having read required text and distributed articles Some evidence of having read required text and distributed articles Very little evidence of having read required text and distributed articles.
    Understanding (x2) Demonstrates insight, awareness and understanding of deeper and more subtle aspects of the topic. Ability to consider topic in the broader context of the discipline. Evidence of an understanding of deeper and more subtle aspects of the topic Sound knowledge of principles and concepts Knowledge of principles and concepts at least adequate to communicate intelligently in the topic or to serve as further study Some knowledge of principles and concepts but insufficient to communicate intelligently in the topic or to serve as a basis for further study
    Proposal Components
    (x2)
    All of the proposal components have been included and are well developed. One of the proposal components are missing or not fully develop Two of the proposal components are missing or not fully developed Three or more proposal components are missing. Those included are well developed Proposal component are missing and those included are not fully developed
     Web Design
     Visual Appearance/ Organization (x1)   There is a consistent format from page-to-page. Text is broken into paragraphs and/or sections. Headings label sections and create an easy to understand hierarchy and consistency. Backgrounds enhance the text and the overall effectiveness of the page. Page is easy to navigate. Text is broken into paragraphs and/or sections. Headings label sections and create some hierarchy and consistency. Backgrounds work with text, but do little to enhance the overall effectiveness of the page. Page is easy to navigate. Text is broken into paragraphs and/or sections. Headings label sections and create some hierarchy and consistency. Backgrounds work with text, but do little to enhance the overall effectiveness of the page. Page is relatively easy to navigate. Text is broken into paragraphs and/or sections. Backgrounds work with text, but do little to enhance the overall effectiveness of the page. Page is difficult to navigate The layout has no structure or organization. Backgrounds, if used conflict with text. Page is difficult to navigate.
     Text (x1)   The text is clear, concise, and well written. There are no spelling or grammar errors. The written text is easy to understand. There are no spelling errors, but one or more grammar or syntax errors. The written text is easy to understand. There are a few spelling and grammar errors. The written text is easy to understand.
    There are many spelling and grammar errors.
    The written text is difficult to understand and does not stick to the topic. There are spelling and/or grammar errors
     Links (x1)   All links are present, active and work. Return links are consistently provided and work. Most links work or are activated. Most return links are provided and work. Most links work or are activated. Some return links are provided and work. Some links work, but some are not active or are missing. Return links are not always provided. Links are either missing, inactive, or do not work.
     Graphics (x1) Graphics enhance the page.
    Images are proper size, resolution and colouring.
    Graphics are used as links.
    Graphics enhance the page.
    Images are proper size, resolution and colouring.
    Graphics enhance the page. Graphics (size and type) used make loading of pages very slow. Graphics show some relation to page content. Graphics (size and type) used make loading of pages very slow.

    Too many graphics.
    Graphics, if used, are not related to page content. Graphics (size and type) used make loading of pages very slow.

    Too many graphics.

    Essay
    5 4 3 2 1
    Content
    General Description (x1) Outstanding or exceptional work in terms of understanding, interpretation and presentation A very high standard of work which demonstrates originality and insight Demonstrates a high level of understanding and presentation, and a degree of originality and insight Satisfies the minimum requirements Fails to satisfy the minimum requirements
    Reading (x2) Strong evidence of independent reading beyond required text and distributed articles Evidence of reading beyond required text and distributed articles Thorough understanding of required text and distributed articles Evidence of having read required text and distributed articles Very little evidence of having read required text and distributed articles
    Knowledge of Topic (x3) Demonstrates insight, awareness and understanding of deeper and more subtle aspects of the topic. Ability to consider topic in the broader context of the discipline.

    Evidence of an understanding of deeper and more subtle aspects of the topic

    Sound knowledge of principles and concepts Knowledge of principles and concepts at least
    adequate to communicate intelligently in the topic or to serve as further study
    Scant knowledge of principles and concepts BS at its best!
    Articulation of argument (x2) Significant demonstration of originality and independent thought Evidence in place of originality an independent thought Well-reasoned argument based on broad evidence Sound argument based on evidence
     No evidence of ability to construct coherent argument
    Structure and Language (x1) Conceptual thinking expressed effectively Effective use of complex language Clear language, use of formal writing style Adequate expression Inconsistent and difficult to follow
    Referencing and Bibliography (x1) Referencing system used thoroughly and precisely, and extensive bibliography Referencing system used accurately and bibliography detailed Consistent referencing and bibliography adequate Minimum level of referencing and bibliography No references or no bibliography
    Submission
    Assignments to be submitted as hard copy should be word-processed and double-spaced using word processing software (e.g. MS Word, MS Works, Open Office Word, iWork Pages, etc.) and printed on standard white A4 paper. Preferred fonts with sizes 11 to 12 are the following: Arial, Calibri, Cambria, Garamond and Times New Roman.

    An electronic copy of the assignment, in PDF format, including a scanned copy of a prescribed cover sheet, may also be submitted. The quality of English expression is considered to be integral parts of the assessment process. Marks may be deducted for poorly organised and poorly presented work.

    Assignments/Essays with no signed cover sheet will NOT be accepted.

    Assessment marks will be displayed on the course website as they are available. Students are encouraged to check their marks and notify the lecturer-in-charge of any discrepancies.


    Extensions for Written Assessment

    Extensions are granted at the discretion of Course Coordinators or Assessment Officer in compliance with the Modified Arrangements for Coursework Assessment Policy. Extensions beyond the due date are usually only granted in the case of significant medical, compassionate or extenuating circumstances which affect a student’s capacity to demonstrate their demonstrate their true level of competence in an assessment task.

    Students must apply for an extension by completing the online Application for Extension form. The application must give details of the extent and length of the student’s medical, compassionate or extenuating circumstances and the length of extension that is requested. The Course Coordinator or Assessment Officer will email the student regarding the outcome of their request as soon as possible after it is received. If an extension is granted it is provisional until formal evidence of the medical, compassionate or extenuating circumstances referred to in the online Application for Extension form is received. Where the application for extension is based on medical circumstances students must submit Attachment A available at the Modified Arrangements for Coursework Assessments website (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/3303/) . Students must have an Australian registered medical practitioner complete Attachment A. The practitioner must clearly indicate the dates in which the student is deemed to be unfit to complete an examination and display their medical provider number or practitioner's official stamp on the Form. Students must attach this evidence as well as the email granting the extension to their written assessment when it is submitted. The evidence submitted must be consistent with details provided in the application requesting the extension. If the details of the request for an extension and the medical or other evidence verifying the reason for the extension are not consistent in all respects the extension may be nullified, and the Course Coordinator of Assessment Officer may in their discretion decide not to accept the assignment, or impose a penalty for late submission.

    Students can apply for an extension at any time before the due date for an assignment. However, students are strongly advised to make extension applications as soon as their need becomes apparent. Delay in making an application obviously involves the risk that there will be insufficient time to complete the assessment (with consequential loss of marks) if the application for extension is refused.

    If an application is made within five days of the due date, or after the due date has expired, it will not be granted unless the Course Coordinator or Assessment Officer is satisfied:

     that the circumstances warrant an extension; and
    the application was made as soon as was practicable, and with no unreasonable delay.

    The duration of an extension is for the Course Coordinator or Assessment Officer to determine. However, unless there are exceptional circumstances an extension should not be granted for more than 10 business days or beyond the last day on which teaching may occur in the relevant teaching period, whichever is earlier.

    If a request for an extension is rejected, the student can appeal via the Student Grievance Resolution Process within seven days of notification of rejection by the Course Coordinator or Assessment Officer.


    Penalties for Late Submission

    An assessment that is submitted after the due date, and without an extension, will incur a 5% deduction from the total mark for every 24 hours or part thereof that it is late, including each day on a weekend. For example, an essay that is submitted after the due date and time but within the first 24 hour period, and that has been graded at 63%, will have 5% deducted, for a final grade of 58%. An essay that is more than 24 hours late will lose 10%, etc. Hard copy submissions made after 5.00pm on a Friday will be assumed to have been submitted on the next business day and will be penalised 5% per day for every day including weekend days and public holidays. This penalty may be increased where the assignment is to be completed in a period of less than a week.



    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.