EDUC 7010NA - Innovations in Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Ngee Ann Academy - Quadmester 3 - 2015

The aim of the topic is to familiarise students with emerging technologies, and the theoretical, pedagogical and research-based evidence for decision making on optimising learning and enhancing teaching. The topic seeks to highlight the pertinent nexus between teaching, learning, assessment and research. This topic consists of a negotiated, inter-/trans-disciplinary and school-based project that results in creation of a Reflections Portfolio and the design and implementation of a practical (trial and evaluated) unit of work. Interoperability, portability and standards issues will be examined and discussed.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code EDUC 7010NA
    Course Innovations in Teaching, Learning and Assessment
    Coordinating Unit School of Education
    Term Quadmester 3
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s Ngee Ann Academy
    Units 3
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Restrictions M Ed students only - Singapore
    Course Description The aim of the topic is to familiarise students with emerging technologies, and the theoretical, pedagogical and research-based evidence for decision making on optimising learning and enhancing teaching. The topic seeks to highlight the pertinent nexus between teaching, learning, assessment and research. This topic consists of a negotiated, inter-/trans-disciplinary and school-based project that results in creation of a Reflections Portfolio and the design and implementation of a practical (trial and evaluated) unit of work. Interoperability, portability and standards issues will be examined and discussed.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Sivakumar Alagumalai

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    The aim of the topic is to familiarise students with learning futures, emerging technologies, and the theoretical, pedagogical and research-based evidence for decision making on optimising learning and enhancing teaching. The topic seeks to highlight the pertinent nexus between teaching, learning, assessment and research, and the role of information and communications technology and learning futures. Activities and assessment tasks include critically examining theories and evidences in education (including learning organisations), and the design and implementation of a practical (trial and evaluated) school/program of study/unit of work. Interoperability, portability and standards issues will be examined and discussed.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    2.1 COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    2.1.1. Knowledge and Understanding
    2.1.1.1. This course aims to present information on a range of emerging innovations in education, including the issues and implications associated with them. It highlights the theoretical underpinnings of the concept of ‘Innovation’. Within the Australian education context, how innovations will impact on the AITSL Australian professional standards for teachers will be of central focus. It also aims to familiarise students on the theoretical, pedagogical and research-based evidence for decision making on optimising learning and enhancing teaching.

    2.1.1.2. This course aims to develop an increased awareness of the current local and global trends in innovations in education particularly on the findings of research studies on different technological innovations adopted for use in teaching and learning, including assessment. Furthermore, this course seeks to highlight the pertinent nexus between teaching, learning, assessment and research.

    2.1.1.3. This course will encourage students to translate theory into practice in one or more issues that they can utilise in their own teaching. A number of emerging innovations, namely cognitive neuroscience, reflective practice, inquiry and problem-based learning, will be examined.

    2.1.1.4. This course will contribute to participants’ capacity to examine education-related studies and draw conclusions for everyday practice. In addition, the course will enable participants to integrate research findings from a number of disciplines such as psychology, sociology, measurement, history, and studies of curriculum in various subject areas.

    2.1.1.5. Participants in the course will contribute to developing the capacity to write essays on education-related topics, which are both clear and demonstrate a high level of understanding. The course will also contribute to the development of the participants’ capacity to begin the planning of Web design containing information about ‘Future Schools’, and the ability to apply education research in an international context.

    2.1.1.6. The course will contribute to students’ capacity to share and collaborate with fellow students, and an awareness and expertise in the collaborative practices of teachers with each other and with the broader educational community.

    2.1.2. Communication Skills
    The continuing development of good inter-personal and communication skills is widely recognised as important for all graduates.

    2.1.2.1. This course specifically seeks to develop students’ abilities to discuss issues in a workshop environment. This allows for group, collaborative and individual responses.

    2.1.2.2. Show critical thinking and reflection through group interaction, oral and written presentations.

    Specific Learning Outcomes:

    1. Critically review theories, concepts and models related to Learning, Teaching, Assessment, and ICT in education
    2. Examine the nexus between teaching, learning, assessment and innovations in education
    3. Evaluate issues in the delivery of instructions and learning
    4. Apply theories and models in the design of practical learning contexts
    5. Review, critique and design interactive learning and effective assessment practices
    6. Discuss emerging trends of the application of information and communications in education
    7. Describe applications of online learning environments for enhancing learning, teaching and assessment
    8. Evaluate research on innovations in education
    9. Discuss evaluation strategies to gauge innovations



    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 2.1.1.1 – 2.1.1.4
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2.1.1.3, 2.1.1.4
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 2.1.1.3, 2.1.1.4, 2.1.1.5, 2.1.2.1, 2.1.2.2
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 2.1.2.1, 2.1.2.2
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2.1.1.4, 2.1.1.5
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 2.1.1.2, 2.1.1.4, 2.1.2
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 2.1.1, 2.1.2
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 2.1.1.3, 2.1.1.4, 2.1.2
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

     

    Module

    Readings

     

    Intensive 1

    Friday [7-10pm]

    Course Outline & Rubrics

     Schleicher, A. (2015), Schools for 21st-Century Learners: Strong Leaders, Confident Teachers, Innovative Approaches, International Summit on the Teaching Profession, OECD Publishing.

     NIE/NTU. A Teacher Education Model for the 21st Century: A Report by the National Institute of Education, Singapore.

    Myths and Fads in Education [Innovations in LTA] – Compilation

     Wineburg, S., & Schneider, J. (2010). Was Bloom’s Taxonomy Pointed in the Wrong Direction? The Phi Delta Kappan, 91(4), pp.56-61.

    Case, R. (2013). The unfortunate consequences of Bloom’s taxonomy. First published in National Council for the Social Studies, In Social Education, 77(4), pp.196-200.

     Booker, M.J. (2007). A Roof without Walls: Benjamin Bloom’s Taxonomy and the Misdirection of American Education. Acad. Quest.,20, pp.347–355.

     Istance, D. (2001), “The School of the Future”, PEB Exchange, Programme on Educational Building, 2001/13, OECD Publishing.

     

    Saturday
    – Part 1

    [1 - 4pm]

    OECD (2005). A Report of the Learning Sciences and Brain Research, Report prepared by

    Christina D. Hinton, Learning Sciences and Brain Research Project, OECD.

    Klein, J.T. (2013). The Transdisciplinary Moment(um). Integral Review, 9(2), pp. 189-199.

     OECD (2007). Understanding the Brain: The Birth of a Learning Science.

     Learning Theories and Enhancements.

     Learning approaches, principles and theories [Activity]:

     Instructional Design – A Primer.

     Hannon, V. (2012). Learning Futures (UK Report).

     OECD. (2013). Innovative Learning Environments.

     

    Saturday
    – Part 2

    [4.30 – 8.30pm]

    Barak., M. (2004). Systematic Approaches for Inventive Thinking and Problem-Solving: Implications for Engineering Education. International Journal of Engineering Education, 20(4), pp. 612-618.

    Paul, R., & Elder, L. (2008). Critical and Creative Thinking.

    Robinson, L. (2009). A summary of Diffusion of Innovations.

    Diffusion of Innovations Theory (Notes).

    Everett M. Rogers, E.M. (1983). Diffusion of Innovations. (3rd Ed.). NY: The Free Press.

     

    Sunday – Part 1

    [9am – 12pm]

    Fullan, M., & Langworthy, M. (2013). Towards a New End: New Pedagogies for Deep Learning. Pearson.

    The Future of the Curriculum: School Knowledge in the Digital Age (2013)

     

    Sunday – Part 2

    [12.30 – 4.30pm]

     

    A 21st Century Imperative:  A Guide to Becoming a School of the Future (2010)

    Partnership for 21st Century Learning

     

     

     

     

    Intensive 2

    Friday [7-10pm]

    Christodoulou, D. (2014). Minding The Knowledge Gap: The Importance of Content in Student Learning. American Educator, Spring Issue, pp.27-33.

    The Nature of Assessment (and Testing) – Perceptions and Reality

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Shepard, L.A. (2000). The Role of Assessment in a Learning Culture. Educational Researcher, 29(7), pp. 4-14.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Gunzenhauser, M.G. (2003). High-Stakes Testing and the Default Philosophy of Education. Theory into Practice, 42(1), pp.51-58.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Pedagogy and Practice: Teaching and Learning in Secondary School – Assessment for Learning.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Stiggins, R.J. (2002). Assessment Crisis: The Absence Of Assessment FOR Learning

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Black, P. (2007). Formative Assessment: Promises or problems?

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Edwards, N. (2010). An analysis of the alignment of the Grade 12 Physical Sciences examination and the core curriculum in South Africa.

    Saturday
    – Part 1

    [1 - 4pm]

    Innovations in Assessment (Testing)

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Poster (2010). Extending Learning through Feedback

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Falchikov, N., & Thompson, K. (2008). Assessment: What Drives Innovation? Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 5(1), pp.49-60.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Jung, I., & Latchem, C. (2011). A Model for e-education: Extended teaching spaces and extended learning spaces. British Journal of Educational Technology, 42(1), pp.6-18.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Wang, T.H., et al. (2004). Web-based Assessment and Test Analysis (WATA) system: development and evaluation. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 20, pp.59-71.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Alagumalai, S., & Curtis, D.D. (2005). Classical Test Theory.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Keeves, J.P., & Alagumalai, S. (1999). New Approaches to Measurement.

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Wright, B.D. (1999). How to convince your friends NOT to misuse raw scores. (ppt)

    <!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Alagumalai, S., & Keeves, J.P. (1999). Distractors – Can They Be Biased too?

    Masters, G. N. (2013). Reforming Educational Assessment: Imperatives, principles and challenges, Australian Education Review No 57, Melbourne: ACER.

     Sea Change in Assessment: How Technology Is Transforming K-12 Testing. 2014 Report of the K-12 Center at ETS

    Saturday \
    – Part 2

    [4.30 – 8.30pm]

    Kasworm, C. (2011). The Influence of the Knowledge Society: Trends in Adult Higher

    Education. The Journal of Continuing Higher Education, 59, pp.104–107.

    McKinsey Global Institute. (2013). Disruptive technologies: Advances that will transform life, business, and the global economy.

     

    KPMG. (2012). Mobilizing Innovation: The changing landscape of disruptive technologies.

    Sunday – Part 1

    [9am – 12pm]

    Stewart, V. (2012). TransformingLearning     in Cities:  The Global Cities Education Network. Inaugural Symposium.   Hong Kong. May 10–12, 2012.

    Brown, J. (2015). Personalizing Post-Secondary Education: An Overview of Adaptive Learning Solutions for Higher Education. Ithaka S+R.

    Sunday – Part 2

    [12.30 – 4.30pm]

     

    Building the School of the Future: A Guide for 21st Century Learning Environments

    Fraser, K. (2013). Learning_Environments_and_New_Spaces_LiteratureReview.

    Friesen, S. (2010). Student Engagement, Equity, and the Culture of Schooling. A provocation paper prepared for the Canada-United States Colloquium on Achieving Equity Through Innovation.

     The school of the future: key issues for school leaders 

     

     

     

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary

     

    Module

    Topics/Contents

    Intensive 1

    Friday [7-10pm]

    Introduction

    Assessments and Requirements

    What is shaping the future of education and educational institutions?

    Myths and Fads in Education

    School of the Future

    Saturday – Part 1

    [1 - 4pm]

    Learning Theories and Instructional / Learning Designs

    Teaching for deep learning

    Cognitive Acceleration

    Collaborative learning

    Student Co-Researchers

    Modes Teaching/Learning

    Saturday – Part 2

    [4.30 – 8.30pm]

    Creativity, Innovation and Inventive Thinking, and Learning Sciences

    Diffusion of Innovations

    Assignment #1 Presentation

    Sunday – Part 1

    [9am – 12pm]

    Innovating Schools

    The OECD schooling scenarios

    Delivery of Instructions [Pedagogy/Content]

    Sunday – Part 2

    [12.30 – 4.30pm]

     

    Learning Outcome

    Skills for the future – 21st CS

    Innovation in Schools

    Assignment 2 - Learner and Learning Needs: L-T-A Nexus and Implications for 21st Century Learners. Individual Poster (25%). Submission Date: Monday, 27 July 2015 [by 4pm, S’pore time] 

    Intensive 2

    Friday [7-10pm]

    Assignment #2 (Poster) – Peer Assessment

    Assessment and Education

    Saturday – Part 1

    [1 - 4pm]

    Assessment

    CTT and IRT

    e-assessment

    Learning Analytics

    Saturday – Part 2

    [4.30 – 8.30pm]

    ICT and Education

    Disruptive Technologies

    E-Learning / Mobile-Learning

    21st Century Skills [EnGauge]

    Assignment #3 Presentation

    Sunday – Part 1

    [9am – 12pm]

    Learning Activities Management Systems (LAMS)

    Course Management Systems (CMS)

    Resource [Item] Banking, Archives and Portals [Education]; MOOCs

    Sunday – Part 2

    [12.30 – 4.30pm]

     

    Innovative learning space

    Learning Hubs [example UofA, ASMS]

    Educational Environment of the Future 

    Assignment 4 – Essay: Innovations and implementation for L/T/A (Individual) (2500 - 3000 words) [40%]   Submission Date: Monday, 31 August 2015 [by 4pm, Singapore time]

     

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assignment 1: Fads & Myths in Education – Group Presentation [5-minute thesis format] SGD & Critique [15%].
    Presentation Date: Saturday, 11 July 2015 [4.30 – 8.30pm]

    Assignment 2 - Learner and Learning Needs: L-T-A Nexus and Implications for 21st Century Learners. Individual Poster [25%] & Peer Assessment [5%]
    Submission Date: Monday, 27 July 2015 [by 4pm, Singapore time]
    Peer Assessment Date: Friday, 14 August 2015 [7-8pm]

    Assignment 3: Web Design (SGD) [15%]
    Educational Environment of the Future (Group)
    Presentation Date: Saturday, 15 August 2015 [4.30-8.30pm]

    Assignment 4: Essay - Innovations and implementation for L/T/A (Individual) (2500 - 3000 words) [40%]
    Submission Date: Monday, 31 August 2015 [by 4pm, Singapore time]
    Assessment Detail
    ASSESSMENT
    Criteria/rubrics for assessment will be presented and discussed in class.

    Assignment 1: Fads & Myths in Education – Group Presentation [5-minute thesis format] SGD & Critique [15%].
    Presentation Date: Saturday, 11 July 2015 [4.30 – 8.30pm]

    Select three ‘fads & myths’ in education, provide a critique of each, and their implications on classroom practices. Highlight in your presentation two other ‘popular’ educational ‘innovations’, not on the list in the EDUC7010NA Reader, which warrant attention and further research (you must present relevant evidence to support your arguments).

    Assignment 2 - Learner and Learning Needs: L-T-A Nexus and Implications for 21st Century Learners. Individual Poster [25%] & Peer Assessment [5%]
    Submission Date: Monday, 27 July 2015 [by 4pm, Singapore time]
    Peer Assessment Date: Friday, 14 August 2015 [7-8pm]

    List the key attributes of learners and their learning needs for the 21st Century. Design a learning environment that includes the attributes you have identified and defined to prepare your students or your adult learner in your learning organisation for the 21st century. Using current technologies you will interact with team members, experts, and your colleagues through the Internet. You may want to use existing survey instruments or develop your own questionnaire to elicit response to assist you in the design of a learning environment. Use your research to justify and support the vision of your learning environment.

    Design a poster to communicate the process you adopted, research evidences which support your design, and all relevant findings and conclusion. An e-copy of the poster must be sent to the Course Facilitator for assessment (25%). You will also prepare a hardcopy of your poster (maximum two-A3 paper size: A3 – 297mm x 420mm) to be displayed in class and for your peers to assess your work (5%).

    You may want to use the following headings for our poster:
    • Title
    • Introduction and Research Focus/Question
    • Methods (and materials)
    • Findings / Results / Discussion (your inputs, critique, research)
    • Conclusion
    • Future Prospects (for use in your lesson/class/context, and research possibilities)
    • References
    • [Layout and Presentation]

    Assignment 3: Web Design (SGD) [15%]
    Educational Environment of the Future (Group)
    Presentation Date: Saturday, 15 August 2015 [4.30-8.30pm]

    In groups, you will initially be involved in designing a productive learning environment for your students/clients/learners of the future. Through the development of the future learning environments, you and your team will be involved in learning various aspects of educational environment for the future and best use of technology for engaging the learner, as well as have the opportunity to design your vision. You will ‘showcase’ your ‘School of the Future’ on the Internet. Hence, you will need to design a website. Your website will contain all the necessary information about your school’s learning environment, and relevant contents (you may want to select a subject or course with a series of learning modules) thus providing prospective parents and students a good insight of what the school can deliver using contemporary innovations in teaching, learning and assessment.

    You may use any available software to develop your website (PHP [if you know HTML coding], Publisher, Dreamweaver, Google Sites, etc.). You may present your School of the Future as a stand-alone, ready-to-go-live website, or you may use free-to-use web-clients such as Google. You may want to utilise a web-based slides presentation tool such as Prezi. Compatibility of your website to all web-browser platforms is not necessary.

    Assignment 4: Essay - Innovations and implementation for L/T/A (Individual) (2500 - 3000 words) [40%]
    Submission Date: Monday, 31 August 2015 [by 4pm, Singapore time]

    You are required to write an essay on any of the innovations we have discussed in the course. It will be useful to draw upon your own experience as a teacher/educator, trainer or educational consultant and the area or subject you have taught [or may be currently teaching]. You may want to start with what the ‘traditional practices’ were and why you think they may not optimize learning. It will be useful to draw from the resources distributed in class, as well as any further readings you may have undertaken beyond distributed articles.
    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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