CLAS 2029 - Rome! Rise of Empire from 509BC to AD14

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2021

Rome was the greatest city in the ancient world; the Roman empire is one of the most remarkable achievements in human history. This module on Roman Republican History looks at the emergence of city and empire in the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC. It will also place a special emphasis on the tumultuous and violent politics that overtook the Late Republic as it moved through the first century BC; for even as the power of Rome spread far and wide, serious social problems and intense rivalries emerged at home. We will consider how and why the fight to maintain domestic order became even more desperate and difficult than the task of dominating overseas. In this period of history, all attention shifts onto Rome -- what happened then and there shook the ancient Mediterranean and had far-reaching consequences we still feel today.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code CLAS 2029
    Course Rome! Rise of Empire from 509BC to AD14
    Coordinating Unit Classics
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of Level I undergraduate study including at least 3 units of Level I Classics courses
    Incompatible CLAS 2017 or CLAS 3017
    Course Description Rome was the greatest city in the ancient world; the Roman empire is one of the most remarkable achievements in human history. This module on Roman Republican History looks at the emergence of city and empire in the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC. It will also place a special emphasis on the tumultuous and violent politics that overtook the Late Republic as it moved through the first century BC; for even as the power of Rome spread far and wide, serious social problems and intense rivalries emerged at home. We will consider how and why the fight to maintain domestic order became even more desperate and difficult than the task of dominating overseas. In this period of history, all attention shifts onto Rome -- what happened then and there shook the ancient Mediterranean and had far-reaching consequences we still feel today.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Margaret O'Hea

    Han Baltussen
    Margaret O'Hea
    Details as to contact and consultation hours will be on MyUni.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Lecture schedule and tutorial programme will be on MyUni before the start of teaching.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Understanding and interpreting the key evidence for Roman history during the Republican period
    2. Develop scholarly approach to and methodology  for historical interpretation of texts and material evidence for this period
    3. Become familiar with key Latin terminology for this period
    4. Understanding the key cultural influences on Roman Republican culture
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-2
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1-4
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1-2
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Textbooks:
    • Polybius (Penguin edn),  The Rise of the Roman Empire, transl. I. Scott-Kilvert (any available edn of the Penguin, but preferably a recent one: also available on Kindle)  OR you can buy The Histories, transl R. Waterfield (Oxford World's Classics paperback).
    • Dillon, M. and Garland, L.  (eds) (2005 edn or later) Ancient Rome From the Early Republic to the Assassination of Julius Caesar. Abingdon: Routledge. You can buy this on Amazon Australia for AUD 60.99 https://www.amazon.com.au/Ancient-Rome-Republic-assassination-Julius/dp/0415224594
    • Rosenstein, N. and Morstein-Marx, R. (eds) (2006 or later) A Companion to the Roman Republic. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. NO NEED TO BUY: this is available as an ebook via the BSL. Students are expected to use this book throughout the semester.

    We strongly suggest that you order these directly online rather than rely on our campus bookstore.
    Recommended Resources
    See MyUni for further reading material.
    Online Learning
    In addition to the required textbooks, other primary works will be available via MyUni and weblinks to scholarly sites.
    Readings for tutorials will be available either from the BSL or online in MyUni. Students are expected to expand beyond their required reading as part of doing scholarly research.
    These required readings will not be available as a hard-copy 'brick'
    , since part of your gradual skills involves research - learning to find resources - beyond.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Two lectures per week, with weekly tutorials. Most tutorials will deepen and extend students' understanding of topics covered by lectures and textbook; some tutorials will extend to new material not covered by the lectures.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    An average of 12 hours per week, comprising:
    • 3 contact hours
    • average of 3 hours of background-reading and note-taking to consolidate lecture-notes
    • average of 2 hours of tutorial readings and note-taking
    • average of 4 hours of research (reading and note-taking), cogitation, organisation and writing of assignments
    Learning Activities Summary
    The lectures will cover the history of Rome from its foundation to the start of the Augustan period. The tutorial programme is available on MyUni.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Our tutorial programme is embedded with Small Group Discovery work  throughout the semester. This includes - but is not restricted to - analysing, discussing and presenting primary material in small groups within the tutorial class.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    One tutorial summary, max 500 words 10% formative and summative based on readings for that tutorial - cannot be the same topic as tutorial paper
    1,200 word tutorial paper 30% summative chosen from the tutorial programme on MyUni, must differ from tutorial summary topic
    2,000 word essay 40% formative and summative due date, choice of topics and reading list on MyUni
    2 x half-hour tests (each 10%) 20% summative within the teaching semester, times to be confirmed in MyUni
     

    Assessment Related Requirements
    Regular attendance at tutorials is expected of all students in this course. Students should watch and take notes of lectures on a weekly basis.
    Assessment Detail

    • Guides to formatting, structure and citation styles for both tutorial paper and essay are on MyUni for this course, and should be followed for all written work. Assessment criteria  includes showing the appropriate use and formatting of citations and bibliography.
    • Word limits for tutorial papers and essay are approximate guides only. However, a penalty will apply to any paper less than 66% of the word limit, or more  than 133% of the word limit. This penalty will be a deduction of 5% of the final mark for that paper.*
    •  See the School rules pertaining to late submissions on MyUni for this course.
    Submission
    • Students must keep a copy of all assignments until their final grades for the course have been officially released.
    • Classics staff will not read or comment on any first drafts of papers. However, students are encouraged to talk to their tutor about their essay plan and direction of  argument.
    • Any student with an ongoing, serious medical or personal condition which is likely to impact significantly on work is strongly advised to consult with a Student Counsellor or Disability Liaison Officer at the start of semester. A plan can then be negotiated with the course co-ordinator about any necessary modifications to  assessment, such as extension of due dates (although there will be no exemptions from all the assignments, or from regular class attendance).
    • There is no possibility to resubmit any written assignment in this course. 
    • See MyUni for this course for School-wide rules on late penalties, and Faculty-wide policy on applications for late submission without penalty.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    50-64% P
    • Basic understanding;
    • basic readings;
    • adequate knowledge of relevant concepts;
    • sound, evidence-based argument;
    • adequate expression & presentation.
    65-74% Cr
    • High level of understanding;
    • thorough understanding of basic texts;
    • sound knowledge of relevant concepts;
    • analytical, evaluative skills;strong expression & presentation.
    75-84% D
    • Insightful understanding;
    • evidence of additional independent reading;
    • deeper understanding of more subtle concepts;
    • analytical,evaluative skills;
    • well-developed expression & presentation.
    85-100% HD
    • exceptional understanding;
    • strong evidence of additional independent reading;
    • deeper understanding of more subtle concepts;
    • analytical, evaluative skills;
    • highly-developed expression & presentation;
    • originality & independent thought.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.