ENGL 1107 - Shakespeare

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

This course will look closely at four Shakespeare plays, one each from the major genres of tragedy, comedy, history, and romance. The plays to be studied will vary from year to year depending on participating staff members. Topics covered will include character, form, spectacle, theme, sources, the original conditions of production, and the reproduction of Shakespeare's plays in a contemporary context. Students will be introduced to a range of critical approaches to Shakespeare's plays, and be encouraged to reflect on questions of canonicity, cultural value and authority, and the politics of production and reproduction. Film and TV adaptations of the plays may be used to enhance discussion and reflection. The course is suitable for students with little or no prior knowledge of Shakespeare and also for those wishing to become more familiar with the playwright's work. It may be studied as a 'one off' course or for the sound basis it will provide for studying some of the advanced courses offered by the Discipline of English, such as Old Texts Made New: Literary Imitation and Allusion, Tragedy, Renaissance Writing and Adaptation.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ENGL 1107
    Course Shakespeare
    Coordinating Unit English and Creative Writing
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Course Description This course will look closely at four Shakespeare plays, one each from the major genres of tragedy, comedy, history, and romance. The plays to be studied will vary from year to year depending on participating staff members. Topics covered will include character, form, spectacle, theme, sources, the original conditions of production, and the reproduction of Shakespeare's plays in a contemporary context. Students will be introduced to a range of critical approaches to Shakespeare's plays, and be encouraged to reflect on questions of canonicity, cultural value and authority, and the politics of production and reproduction. Film and TV adaptations of the plays may be used to enhance discussion and reflection. The course is suitable for students with little or no prior knowledge of Shakespeare and also for those wishing to become more familiar with the playwright's work. It may be studied as a 'one off' course or for the sound basis it will provide for studying some of the advanced courses offered by the Discipline of English, such as Old Texts Made New: Literary Imitation and Allusion, Tragedy, Renaissance Writing and Adaptation.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Lucy Potter

    This course will look closely at four Shakespeare plays, one each from the major genres of tragedy, comedy, history, and romance. The plays to be studied will vary from year to year depending on participating staff members. Topics covered will include character, form, spectacle, theme, sources, the original conditions of production, and the reproduction of Shakespeare's plays in a contemporary context. Students will be introduced to a range of critical approaches to Shakespeare's plays, and be encouraged to reflect on questions of canonicity, cultural value and authority, and the politics of production and reproduction. Film and TV adaptations of the plays may be used to enhance discussion and reflection. The course is suitable for students with little or no prior knowledge of Shakespeare and also for those wishing to become more familiar with the playwright's work. It may be studied as a 'one off' course or for the sound basis it will provide for studying some of the advanced courses offered by the Discipline of English, such as Old Texts Made New: Literary Imitation and Allusion, Tragedy, Renaissance Writing and Adaptation.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Understand and interpret Shakespearean drama
    2 Undertake textual analysis of Shakespeare's plays
    3 Explain key terms, concepts and dramatic genres in Shakespeare's plays
    4 Read and interpret criticism and apply it within an academic argument
    5 Locate and access primary and secondary sources
    6 Write logical and coherent arguments based on evidence, and engage in critical debate
    7 Work with others in the exploration of ideas and to collectively negotiate solutions to problems
    8 Evaluate Shakespeare's contribution to the English language, and to the development of modern thought
    9 Use technologies relevant to the University learning environment
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 3, 4
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 5, 8
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 1, 2, 4, 8
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 6, 7
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 9
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1, 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Primary texts:
    Shakespeare, William. A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Ed. Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen. RSC* edition. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2008.
    Othello. Ed. Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen. RSC edition. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2009.
    The Winter’s Tale. Ed. Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen. RSC edition. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2009.
    King Henry V. Ed. Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen. RSC edition. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2010.

    *RSC = Royal Shakespeare Company.

    Sequencing: as above

    Secondary text:
    The New Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare. Ed. Margreta de Grazia and Stanley Wells. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.
    Recommended Resources
    The English homepage on the Barr Smith Library site has an excellent section on resources for the study of Shakespeare and his work. Click on the following link:

    http://libguides.adelaide.edu.au/english-shakespeare
    Online Learning
    The English homepage on the Barr Smith Library site has an excellent section on resources for the study of Shakespeare and his work. Click on the following link:

    http://libguides.adelaide.edu.au/english-shakespeare
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Students are expected to know the four set plays thoroughly. Lectures will cover broad topics, such as genre, canonicity, and the original conditions of production while allowing for more than one perspective on each play to be articulated. Seminars will involve close reading and other textual tasks that will increase students’ knowledge of the plays, encourage students to actively participate in literary criticism, explore areas of interest to them, and increase their confidence in dealing with unfamiliar language. Discrete seminar tasks will increase understanding by moving from particular examples to general topics and concepts, and will introduce students to Shakespeare’s contribution to the English language and its development. To enhance students’ appreciation of the texts as plays, students will engage in reading aloud and short performances of selected scenes.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students will commit a total of 156 hours over the semester.

    Learning Activities Summary
    Week 1: Introduction
    Week 2: A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Week 3: Othello
    Week 4: The Winter's Tale
    Week 5: King Henry V
    Week 6: A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Week 7: Othello
    Week 8: The Winter's Tale
    Week 9: King Henry V
    Week 10: Key Terms and Concepts: revision
    Week 11: Key Terms and Concepts: revision
    Week 12: Course consolifdation and exam revision
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    To be advised
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type  Learning Objectives
    Close Reading Exercise Summative 1, 2, 6, 9
    Research Essay Summative 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9
    Journal Summative  1, 3, 5, 8, 9
    Participation Formative 1, 3, 7, 8
    Examination Summative 1, 2, 3, 6
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students are expected to have read the four set plays before lectures begin. Note that attendance at seminars is expected. 
    Assessment Detail
    Close Reading
    Students will be required to comment on a passage from a play they will have studied noting, for example, where the passage occurs, the themes it expresses, language use, and narrative significance to the play as a whole.

    Research Essay
    Students will be required to write a research essay on one of the set plays. (The essay MUST NOT be on the same play as the close reading exercise). 
    Essay questions: TBA.
     
    Journal
    Students will be provided with a number of short tasks as the basis for weekly journal entries (ten in total), which they will discuss in tutorials, revise, and submit for assessment.

    Participation
    Students will engage in supportive peer interaction in class activities, and in the co-operative sharing of materials and information.

    Submission
    TBA
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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