LING 2046 - Morphology and Syntax

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

Morphology deals with the internal structure of words and their meaningful parts. Syntax is concerned with sentence structure - how words are combined together to form phrases, phrases combined together to form larger phrases, clauses and sentences, and how clauses are combined together to form complex sentences. Together, morphology and syntax comprise the core of the grammar of a language. Since grammar is no longer a major focus in schools, most students have little understanding of even the most basic notions such as being able to identify parts of speech, or understanding how large constructions are composed out of smaller units. Being able to identify constituents and agreement constraints will help students to improve and correct their academic writing. The course will be practical in focus and will teach students essential skills for the linguistic description and analysis of a language. Along with Phonology, this course is essential for all linguistics students and language teachers (English or otherwise).

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code LING 2046
    Course Morphology and Syntax
    Coordinating Unit Linguistics
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Prerequisites 12 units Level I including LING 1101
    Incompatible LING 2035 & 3035
    Course Description Morphology deals with the internal structure of words and their meaningful parts. Syntax is concerned with sentence structure - how words are combined together to form phrases, phrases combined together to form larger phrases, clauses and sentences, and how clauses are combined together to form complex sentences. Together, morphology and syntax comprise the core of the grammar of a language. Since grammar is no longer a major focus in schools, most students have little understanding of even the most basic notions such as being able to identify parts of speech, or understanding how large constructions are composed out of smaller units. Being able to identify constituents and agreement constraints will help students to improve and correct their academic writing.
    The course will be practical in focus and will teach students essential skills for the linguistic description and analysis of a language. Along with Phonology, this course is essential for all linguistics students and language teachers (English or otherwise).
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mark Clendon

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Develop understanding about the semiotic operation of language in a range of modes, including morphosyntactic coding and pragmatic implicature and be able to articulate these understandings.
    2 Develop understanding about the structure of language, including its morphological subsystems.
    3 Develop understanding about morphophonemic process in language.
    4 Develop understanding about the lexicon and lexical categories.
    5 Develop understanding about compositionality, constituency and dependency relations and be able to identify constituent structure at an advanced level.
    6 Develop understanding about issues in linguistic typology.
    7 Develop understanding about grammatical relations and their expression.
    8 Develop understanding about both lexical and derivational valence and its implications for argument structure.
    9 Develop understanding about a variety of complex sentence phenomena.
    10 Develop in students the ability to undertake grammatical analysis of unfamiliar languages, and an awareness of the range of coding phenomena encountered.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 10
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. 8. 9. 10
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 10
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is delivered through a two-hour lecture and one-hour tutorial each week. Lectures will provide much of the content, but will also provide opportunity for discussion of issues from time to time. Tutorials will be more focussed on practical engagement with language data, problem-solving and discussion. Formative work will be undertaken in tutorials to prepare students for the completion of summative assessment tasks.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 1-hour lecture per week 12 hours per semester
    1 x 2-hour semester per week or equivalent 24 hours per semester
    4 hours reading per week 48 hours per semester
    3 hours research per week 36 hours per semester
    3 hours assignment preparation per week 36 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Introduction to morphology, the morpheme
    Week 2 Inflectional and derivational morphology
    Week 3 Semitic morphology
    Week 4 Reanalysis and other morphological mechanisms of
    lexical expansion
    Week 5 Parts of speech
    Week 6 Pragmatics
    Week 7 Generative grammar: X-bar syntax
    Week 8 X-bar syntax (cont)
    Week 9 Grammatical relations, grammatical alignment
    Week 10 Valency
    Week 11 Complex sentences
    Week 12 Linguistic historical typology
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Learning Outcome
    Data analysis task 1 Formative and Summative 15% 1-10
    Data analysis task 2 Formative and Summative 15% 1-10
    Data analysis task 3 Formative and Summative 15% 1-10
    Data analysis task 4 Formative and Summative 15% 1-10
    Data analysis task 5 Formative and Summative 15% 1-10
    Class presentation Formative and Summative 25% 1-10
    Assessment Detail
    Data analysis tasks (15% x 5)
    Students will analyse data from a variety of languages in order to gain familiarity with the
    range and scope of linguistic coding possibilities, and in order to become
    competent at applying principles learned in class.

    Class presentation (25%)
    Students will select a time in a seminar to present to the class a discussion of some aspect
    of morphology and/or syntax, with reference to a language of their choice, and on a topic of their choice that has been approved by the course coordinator.  Presentations should be of about 20 minutes.

    Submission
    All assignments are to be handed in, with a signed cover sheet attached, to the School Office, Napier Building Level 7. (Linguistics cover sheets (purple) are available outside the School Office).
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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