MINING 3072 - Mining Geomechanics

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2015

This course aims to provide students with the basic knowledge required to undertake geotechnical investigations. The topics covered in the course include: basics of materials behaviour; stress-strain, failure criteria, stress and strain tensors. Basic rock mechanics; rock material behaviour; joints; rock mass strength and deformability and slope stability.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MINING 3072
    Course Mining Geomechanics
    Coordinating Unit School of Civil, Environmental & Mining Eng
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Assumed Knowledge C&ENVENG 1010, GEOLOGY 1104 & C&ENVENG 2025
    Course Description This course aims to provide students with the basic knowledge required to undertake geotechnical investigations. The topics covered in the course include: basics of materials behaviour; stress-strain, failure criteria, stress and strain tensors. Basic rock mechanics; rock material behaviour; joints; rock mass strength and deformability and slope stability.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Murat Karakus

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    The purpose of the Course is to introduce the students to methods of testing, analysis and design appropriate to rock masses, rather than steel and concrete structures.  It is anticipated that on completion of the Course the students will:

    1.       have a working knowledge of the engineering properties of rock
    2.       be able to select and use appropriate methods for the design of rock slopes
    3.       have the necessary grounding in rock mechanics to embark upon a study of the principles of rock engineering
    4.       recognise the evolving nature of the discipline and develop skills to access, evaluate and integrate new knowledge and processes.

    The Course will contribute to the development of the following attributes:

    1.       Appropriate technical knowledge
    2.       Skills of analysis, synthesis and problem solution, and the ability to tolerate ambiguity
    3.       Lifelong ability to learn
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 2
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 2
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 1 and 2
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 3
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 2
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 2
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Lecture material and related spreadsheets will be made available to students in printed form, on MyUni and via email.

    Recommended Resources
    The recommended textbook is B H G Brady and E T Brown, Rock Mechanics for Underground Mining, Wiley.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course will be based on lectures, supported by take-home assignments and a programme of laboratory practicals.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements. Please note that the workload calculated here are only approximate figures.
     
    Learning activity Estimated hours per activity Number of activities Total hours of workload
    Lectures  1 36 36
    Assignments  3* 5 15
    Tests  2 2 4
    Laboratory practicals  1.5 2 3
    Laboratory practicals preparation and write up  3* 8 24
    Revision for tests and examination  3* 12* 36
    Examination  2 1 2
    Total   120
    * These values will, of course, vary substantially from student to student.
    A total of 120 workload hours over 14 weeks (including 2 weeks swot) is approximately 8 hours per week. Students who commit this time can be expected to obtain a Pass or Credit for this Course. Students who wish to secure a Distinction or Higher Distinction will need to commit additional hours.
    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

    Specific Course Requirements
    Laboratory exercises

    Please refer to the Rock Mechanics Laboratory Handout and also the Video Introduction to the Rock Mechanics Laboratory Exercises on the DVD. It will be assumed that you have studied the handout and the video introduction prior to your arrival in the laboratory, so you will be given minimal instruction. Please return the Rock Mechanics Laboratory video with your laboratory report (you are, of course, free to make a copy if you wish). Academic and technical staff will be on hand to assist and to answer any questions.

    The eight exercises in this programme have been designed to provide an introduction to, and an awareness of, basic measurements and test procedures in rock mechanics. The tests will be conducted in the Engineering Annex (LG09), Room NG31 and adjacent areas. Mechanical tests will be conducted on 42 mm diameter Hawkesbury Sandstone specimens, prepared by the University of New South Wales.

    The Class has been randomly divided into Groups of 2 and 3 students. Each Group will work separately through the eight exercises. Each Group will test only one specimen in each of the destructive tests (1, 2, 4a and 4b) then share their results with the Class towards the end of the semester. If one of your destructive tests is unsuccessful, describe what happened in your report, then use the results obtained by another Group. Each Group will attend the laboratory on two occasions: Once to undertake tests 1, 2 and 3 and once to undertake tests 4, 5, 6 and 7.

    Your Group has limited time to conduct these tests so it is imperative that you are well prepared and arrive on time. You will not have time to read through the laboratory handout during the laboratory session, so it is important you study this handout and also the video introduction prior to your session. When you arrive in the laboratory, sign in, locate your test equipment and specimens then start preliminary measurements immediately. Technical staff will be on hand to show you how to operate the mechanical test equipment. Sign out as you leave the laboratory. If you do not sign in and sign out we will assume you have not attended the session. If you are unable to attend your scheduled laboratory session due to illness or other unavoidable factors and are able to submit a doctor’s certificate, join another group and undertake the exercises at another time. Alternatively make arrangements with the lecturer to attend during one of the spare sessions.
    Test number Description Approximate duration, minutes Equipment in Engineering Annex (LG09) unless otherwise stated
    1  Uniaxial Compression Test 15 Seidner compression testing machine
    2  Triaxial Test 30 Seidner compression testing machine
    3  Deformation Test. Demonstration 15 M&F compression testing machine, Room NG31 off Chapman Laboratory
    4a and 4b   (a) Point Load Test and (b) Brazilian Disc Test 15 Point Load tester
    5  Sonic Velocity Test 15 PUNDIT 7
    6  Sonic Velocity Test 15 Wooden block model and compass, in car park
    7  Core Logging 10 Core boxes
    This laboratory programme carries a weighting of 15% for the course. Individual reports (not Group reports) must be handed in by 5.00 pm Monday 13 June 2012. Please return the Rock Mechanics Laboratory video with your laboratory report (you are, of course, free to make a copy if you wish). These laboratory exercises are a compulsory component of the course. Students who do not attend the laboratory sessions and/or do not hand in a laboratory report will fail the course. Students who do not attend the laboratory sessions (or do not sign in and out), but do hand in a laboratory report based on results obtained by other students, will fail the course.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Module Assignments  Test Laboratories Examination Totals 
    Deformable Materials and Fluid Flow  3 questions at 5% = 15% 2 tests at 10% 60 minutes
    20%
    No laboratories No examination 35%
    Rock Mechanics and Slope Stability  2 questions at 5% = 10% No test Hand in report by 5.00 pm Monday 20 June. 15%. 2 hours = 40% 65%
    Totals 25% 20% 15% 40% 100%

    All assessment will be summative. This assessment has, however, been designed to develop and reinforce students’ understanding of the Course material.
    Assessment Related Requirements
    In order to pass the course, students are required to attend final exam and receive minimum 40% of the total mark from final exam. Students who get marks less than 40% from final exam will fail the course.

    The laboratory exercises are a compulsory component of the course.  Students who do not attend the laboratory sessions and/or do not hand in a laboratory report will fail the course.  Students who do not attend the laboratory sessions (or do not sign in and out), but do hand in a laboratory report based on results obtained by other students will fail the course.
    Assessment Detail
    The 60-minute test for Deformable Materials will be full open book.  Student answers will be submitted in the form of handwritten into an examination booklet. Students can bring their hand calculator. Any other electronic devices are NOT allowed.

    The 2-hour closed book examination covering the Rock Mechanics and Slope Stability modules will be held during the normal University examination period.

    Assignments are to be submitted for marking by the specified deadline, which will be about 10 days after the assignment is set.

     Marked assignments will be returned together with outline answers, about two weeks after the submission date.  Outline answers will be emailed to students in electronic form.  No marks will be awarded for work submitted after the submission time and date.  Relatively few brief comments will be written on the student assignments; instead, general comments will be emailed to the
    class.  Any student who needs further clarification or explanation of an assignment (or indeed any other topic) can raise the matter in class, or alternatively make an appointment to meet with the course lecturer.  The following approximate schedule will apply for the assignments.  These dates are subject to change as requirements demand:

        Dates  
    Assignment Topic  Set, by email  Submission, before 5.00 pm
    Min Geo 1  Deformable Materials Friday 13 March Monday 23 March
    Min Geo 2  Deformable Materials Friday 27 April Monday 07 April
    Min Geo 3  Deformable Materials Friday 10 April Monday 27 April
    Min Geo 4  Rock mechanics Friday 08 May Monday 18 May
    Min Geo 5  Rock mechanics Friday 22 May Friday 01 June
    Assessment criteria

    The following assessment criteria will be applied to assignments, laboratory reports and examination questions:

    - The numerical ‘result’ must be substantiated by an ‘answer’comprising a complete mathematical working with appropriate definitions, assumptions, explanations and sketch diagrams at each stage.

    - The result must be numerically correct, with the correct units, magnitude and sign.

    - The appropriate number of significant figures should be reported in the result and the accuracy of the result must not be compromised by rounding errors.

    - Where appropriate, there should be some discussion of the reliability and applicability of the result in the relevant engineering context.

    - The answers to purely descriptive questions, which do not require any calculation and do not have a numerical result, should clearly and comprehensively address the specific question, supported by appropriate diagrams, graphs, formulae, examples and cited references.

    A key ability of an engineer is to recognise when a numerical result ‘looks wrong’ and then go back over the work to check the input data, assumptions, and calculations. The number of significant figures in a numerical result should reflect the precision of the input data. In most cases, 3 or 4 significant figures will be appropriate. More significant figures can be used for intermediate results, to minimise the risk of rounding errors.
    Submission
    Please use the standard School cover sheet, which can be found at:
    http://www.ecms.adelaide.edu.au/civeng/students/docs/assessment_cover_sheet.pdf

    Please post your submissions into the ‘Mining Geomechanics’ box outside the School Office before 5.00 pm on the specified submission date. Work submitted after the submission time and date will be returned unmarked and will be assigned zero marks, unless a doctor’s certificate is presented. Marked assignments will be returned at a suitable lecture. Assignments that have not been collected by students will be available for collection from the box marked ‘Mining Geomechanics’ in room N135d.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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