MDIA 2302 - Media Research Methods

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2015

Research is central to all media activity, whether carried out in commercial, public or academic contexts. This course aims to bring together the theoretical and practical elements of research in the media. Students will be exposed to various research methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative, as they affect the changing media landscape and its evaluation. Students will be exposed to different theoretical paradigms of media research, analysis of competing frameworks for defining the media as object of study, and to debate on issues such as research ethics, intellectual property, effective communication of research findings and cultural sensitivity, among others.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MDIA 2302
    Course Media Research Methods
    Coordinating Unit Media
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of level 1 Arts courses or equivalent, including 3 units in Media
    Incompatible MDIA 2204
    Restrictions Available to B Media students only
    Course Description Research is central to all media activity, whether carried out in commercial, public or academic contexts. This course aims to bring together the theoretical and practical elements of research in the media. Students will be exposed to various research methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative, as they affect the changing media landscape and its evaluation. Students will be exposed to different theoretical paradigms of media research, analysis of competing frameworks for defining the media as object of study, and to debate on issues such as research ethics, intellectual property, effective communication of research findings and cultural sensitivity, among others.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Kathryn Bowd

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    1 Demonstrate knowledge of research literacy
    2 Demonstrate a sound knowledge of basic research methods
    3 Demonstrate an understanding of the significant risk and ethical issues raised by the conduct of media research
    4 Demonstrate a working knowledge of the theories and frameworks through which media are analysed and understood
    5 Demonstrate familiarity with research into media audiences and users
    6 Demonstrate knowledge of research governance and policy
    7 Develop an understanding of media industries and institutions, particularly the role that research plays within the knowledge economy and future career development
    8 Develop a high level of written and oral communication skills
    9 Increase familiarity with collaborative techniques to develop successful work outcomes
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 4
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 8
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 9
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 7
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 3, 6
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 3
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There are no required resources for this course, although regular access to the Internet is needed due to the online content and modes of assignment submission used throughout the semester.
    Recommended Resources
    Students may wish to purchase a media research textbook to support their learning. The following textbooks are recommended, but there are many more available:
    · Anderson, James A. 2012, Media Research Methods: Understanding Metric and Interpretive Approaches, Thousand Oaks, Calif.: SAGE [A complex and challenging read!]
    · Berger, Arthur A. 2011, Media and Communication Research Methods, 2nd ed., Los Angeles: SAGE Publications [New edition of a classic, which is quite readable]
    · Jensen, Klaus (ed.) 2012, A Handbook of Media and Communication Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies, 2nd ed., New York: Routledge [An excellent book with an emphasis on use of theory in research]
    · Priest, Susanna H. 2010, Doing Media Research: An Introduction, 2nd ed., London: SAGE [Good on the total process of research]
    · Webster, James G., Phalen, Patricia F. and Lichty, Lawrence W. 2006, Ratings Analysis: The Theory and Practice of Audience Research, 3rd ed., Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates [Focused on only one area, but it’s important and this is comprehensive]
    · Weerakkody, Niranjala D. 2008, Research Methods for Media and Communication, Melbourne: Oxford University Press [One of the few Australian media research texts and covers all the basics in accessible style]
    · Wimmer, Roger D. and Dominick, Joseph R. 2006, Mass Media Research: An Introduction, 8th ed., Belmont: Thomson Wadsworth [A very well established and respected US textbook]
    Online Learning
    This course makes extensive use of MyUni and some external websites. All assignments are submitted via MyUni using a combination of on-line tests and TurnItIn.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    No information currently available.

    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    In response to feedback provided last year we have made the following changes:
    · Change to topic order and addition of extra topic on website/social media metrics
    · Move to three, rather than 4 tests and change to final test weighting
    · Small changes made to release of multiple-choice tests for Assignment 1
    · Revision to Assignment 3 questions
    · Change to Assignment 3 to remove assessed group element and presentation
    We hope these changes will make this course even better than last year, but please provide your honest evaluation at the end of the course. We always pay careful attention to your evaluation and look for way to act on your advice and comments.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.