ASIA 2025 - Ecological Crisis and Economic Power in Asia

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and analytical skills to comprehend the interplay between economic imperatives and human and ecological crises in the era in which we live - the Asian Century. The course mainly focuses on Japan and China. Japan became the world's second economic superpower in the 1960s and China took over some fifty years later, the same year the nuclear disaster was unleashed in Fukushima. The human and ecological devastation caused by the disaster indicates that we are at a significant crossroad for reimagining the relationships between humankind and nature. Global warming, and large-scale pollution of land, water and air in the region also indicate that environmental destruction in Asia is now a global issue. The course suits students from diverse fields including International Studies, Development Studies, Media Studies, Environmental Policy and Management, Business, Economics and Finance, Education, and Law, as well as Arts and Social Sciences (including Asian Studies, Japanese and Chinese). The course explores how to achieve a sustainable future by addressing three key questions: 1) What can we learn from the 50-year experience of supermodernization in Japan to help us understand the issues arising in rapidly industrialising China: in particular by looking at social movements in Japan, which for many years have been attempting to build a better future; 2) What is the relationship between Japan's success as a supercapitalist country and the experience of those who have been marginalized in the course of its development: victims of industrial pollution, nuclear refugees, farmers and fishermen, the urban poor, the elderly, and young people alienated by the systems of education and employment; 3) What is the significance of Australia when we consider the question of sustainability in the Asian Century. It is expected that on completion of this course students will have acquired a more comprehensive understanding of the issues arising from connections between the economy and ecology, not only within the economic power houses of Asia but also in their relationships with Australia and the world.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ASIA 2025
    Course Ecological Crisis and Economic Power in Asia
    Coordinating Unit Centre for Asian Studies
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Prerequisites 12 units of Level I study
    Incompatible ASIA 2014 & ASIA 3014
    Course Description This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and analytical skills to comprehend the interplay between economic imperatives and human and ecological crises in the era in which we live - the Asian Century. The course mainly focuses on Japan and China. Japan became the world's second economic superpower in the 1960s and China took over some fifty years later, the same year the nuclear disaster was unleashed in Fukushima. The human and ecological devastation caused by the disaster indicates that we are at a significant crossroad for reimagining the relationships between humankind and nature. Global warming, and large-scale pollution of land, water and air in the region also indicate that environmental destruction in Asia is now a global issue. The course suits students from diverse fields including International Studies, Development Studies, Media Studies, Environmental Policy and Management, Business, Economics and Finance, Education, and Law, as well as Arts and Social Sciences (including Asian Studies, Japanese and Chinese).

    The course explores how to achieve a sustainable future by addressing three key questions: 1) What can we learn from the 50-year experience of supermodernization in Japan to help us understand the issues arising in rapidly industrialising China: in particular by looking at social movements in Japan, which for many years have been attempting to build a better future; 2) What is the relationship between Japan's success as a supercapitalist country and the experience of those who have been marginalized in the course of its development: victims of industrial pollution, nuclear refugees, farmers and fishermen, the urban poor, the elderly, and young people alienated by the systems of education and employment; 3) What is the significance of Australia when we consider the question of sustainability in the Asian Century.

    It is expected that on completion of this course students will have acquired a more comprehensive understanding of the issues arising from connections between the economy and ecology, not only within the economic power houses of Asia but also in their relationships with Australia and the world.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Shoko Yoneyama

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On the completion of this course students will:
    1 have a broad, coherent and in-depth knowledge on the structural issues relating to the economic development and the environmental/ecological crisis in (East) Asia.
    2 be able to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise data from a wide variety of sources, including databases specific to Asian Studies.
    3 have the skills to write research reports of publication standard.
    4 have an ability to suggest creative and innovative solutions to issues relating to the ecological crisis in the context of the Asian Century.
    5 develop high order skills in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication, with particular strengths in transcultural and interdisciplinary communication.
    6 be proficient in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies in research, writing, communication and presentation.
    7 be aware of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context.
    8 be autonomous, critical and creative thinkers, able to work as professionals in relevant fields relating to Asia, equipped with the knowledge and skills listed above.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2, 3
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 4
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 5
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 6
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1-8
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 8
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    The Course Reader includes references from varied sources: academic journal articles, book chapters, newspaper articles, essays, reports, etc.  It is available from the Image and Copy Centre (ICC), Level 1 Hughes Building and will also be available digitally through MyUni.
    Recommended Resources
    The Emptiness of Japanese Affluence by Gavan McCormack (1996 and 2001 for the revised edition, New York & London, M.E.Sharpe) presents a thesis that constitutes the backbone of the course.

    The Japanese High School: Silence and Resistance (Shoko Yoneyama, Routledge, London & New York, 1999 paperback edition 2007, available also in Kindle and e-book) is highly relevant for weeks 8&9.
    Online Learning
    MyUni will be used throughout the semester for course-related announcements, and to provide course-related material such as: course outline, workshop schedule, instructions for assignments, etc.

    The recorded lectures will also be available on MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The lectures introduce topics and themes relevant for examining the question of sustainability in the field of Asian Studies and social sciences. The workshops provide opportunities for students to engage actively in learning through reading, discussion and presentation. Based on the knowledge and understanding gained in the lectures and workshops, students work on the Research Essay.

    In accordance with the University Policy, Beacon of Enlightenment, this course emphasises the importance of Research and Small Group Learning. Five progressive learning modes are incorporated to assist students to complete research with feedback from the lecturer and student peers at various stages:
    1) lecture on research method including database search in Asian Studies
    2) individual consultation on research project
    3) annotated bibliography assignment
    4) research presentation, and
    5) final research essay.

    The course is designed to maximise interactive learning while allowing each individual student to pursue their own research interest.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 1-hour lecture (or equivalent) per week 12 hours per semester
    1 x 2-hour workshop (or equivalent) per week 24 hours per semester
    6 hours reading per week 72 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week 24 hours per semester
    2 hours assignment preparation per week 24 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD HOURS 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Introduction: The Nuclear Crisis in Japan and the Question of Sustainability in Asia
    Week 2 Development and the Question of Core and Periphery
    Week 3 Minamata: a Legacy of Modernisation
    Week 4 Environmentalism in Historical Contexts
    Week 5 Imagining the post-Fukushima World
    Week 6 Database for Research in Asian Studies
    Week 7 Globalisation and the Question of Food
    Week 8 Education for Sustainable Development (1): Education for Modernisation
    Week 9 Education for Sustainable Development (2): Youth Alienation & Identity
    Week 10 Civil society Japan: Anti-nuclear Movement (marginalisation & empowerment)
    Week 11 Sustainable Asia and Australia
    Week 12 Student Research Presentation  
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment task Task type Weighting Course learning outcome
    Workshop contribution & notebook Formative and summative 20% 1, 5
    400 word reflection paper Formative and summative 10% 3, 6
    600 word bibliographical exercise and presentation Formative and summative 20% 2-8
    2500 word essay Formative and summative 50% 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8
    Assessment Detail
    Workshop contribution and notetaking: students are expected to attend and participate in workshops, and take notes on the lectures, workshops and course readers - 20% weighting

    400 word reflection paper: students submit a paper on topics discussed in workshops - 10% weighting

    600 word bibliographical exercise and presentation: students submit an annotated bibliography on a chosen topic and do a short presentation on the topic - 20% weighting

    2000 word research essay: students submit an essay on their chosen topic - 50% weighting
    Submission
    All assignments are submitted electronically via MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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