PATHOL 2200 - Biology of Disease II

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

The course provides a general introduction to pathology, i.e. the scientific study of disease. Topics covered include the classification, causes and mechanisms of basic tissue processes which underlie disease (e.g. inflammation, ischaemia, neoplasia) as well as discussion of the pathology of some common diseases (e.g. diabetes mellitus, ischaemic heart disease, and some cancers).

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PATHOL 2200
    Course Biology of Disease II
    Coordinating Unit Anatomy and Pathology
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Prerequisites ANAT SC 1102 & ANAT SC 1103
    Course Description The course provides a general introduction to pathology, i.e. the scientific study of disease. Topics covered include the classification, causes and mechanisms of basic tissue processes which underlie disease (e.g. inflammation, ischaemia, neoplasia) as well as discussion of the pathology of some common diseases (e.g. diabetes mellitus, ischaemic heart disease, and some cancers).
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor David Haynes

    Course Coordinator: David Haynes
    Phone: +61 8 8313 3180
    Email: david.haynes@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Room N315, Medical School North


    Additional Academic Staff

    Associate Professor Corinna Van Den Heuvel
    Phone: +61 8 8313 1456
    Email: corinna.vandenheuvel@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Room N305a, Medical School North

    Dr Frances Corrigan
    Email: frances.corrigan@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: School of Medical Sciences Office, Level 4, Medical School North

    Dr Tania Crotti
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5986
    Email: tania.crotti@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Room N305a, Medical School North

    Dr Mark Gibson
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5337
    Email: mark.gibson@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Room N305a, Medical School North
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 To be able to describe and recognise, at a rudimentary level, the cell and tissue changes in basic disease
    2 To be able to describe the main predisposing factors of diseases common in our community
    3 To relate the learning outcome in 1 above to the outcomes of the common diseases
    4 To have a basic understanding of, and be able to use in context, the terminology used in pathology
    5 To be able to acquire, read, interpret and synthesise information from a variety of sources in a planned and timely manner
    6 To be able to acknowledge and reference sources of information appropriately
    7 To develop a critical and enquiring approach to the study of pathology
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1-4
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 5
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. N/A
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. N/A
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1-7
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. N/A
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Textbooks
    The recommended textbook is: Robbins Basic Pathology, 7th or 8th edition, by Kumar et al, published by WB Saunders.
    If you think you may wish to later study General Pathology IIIHS, you may wish to consider Rubin's Pathology, Clinicopathologic Foundations of Medicine, 5th edition, 2008 edited by Rubin, Strayer, and Rubin (Lippincott Williams and Wilkins) as an alternative.

    Online Resources
    Resources available on the Biology of Disease II MyUni website. All course correspondence including important course information and regular announcements will take place through MyUni. All lecture notes, lecture recordings etc are available on MyUni.
    Online Learning
    You may wish to utilise the following resources.

    Web sites
    There are a wide range of pathology based web sites. These contain tutorials, images of macroscopic and microscopic pathology and links to a range of related sites. A selection of web addresses (in no particular order) follows.
    http://www.pathguy.com
    http://medicalstudent.com/
    http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/pathology/pathmus/
    http://www-medlib.med.utah.edu/WebPath/webpath.html
    http://www.mic.ki.se/Medimages.html
    http://www.mic.ki.se/Diseases/alphalist.html
    http://pathweb.uchc.edu/
    http://www.pathology.vcu.edu/education/education.html
    http://www.humpath.com/
    http://www.path.utah.edu/casepath/
    http://www.pathologyatlas.ro/ZZEnglishHomePathologyAtlas.html
    http://www.path.uiowa.edu/virtualslidebox/

    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd http://www.adelaide.edu.au/learning/students/
    The University provides a range of services to students including academic writing and study skills development, language development and assistance with mathematics and statistics. These services are free to enrolled students.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lecture sessions
    There will be 3 lecture and/or large group tutorial sessions each week. Presentations will commence at 10 minutes past the hour and will last for 40 to 50 minutes. A lecture will be presented in most sessions. The timetable can be found as a separate document on MyUni. Lecture notes should be downloaded from MyUni prior to the lecture as printed handouts will not be distributed at lectures.
    If you do not understand any part of a lecture, do not hesitate to ask for clarification from the lecturer either during the lecture, afterwards or by email.
    Lecture notes only aim to provide an outline of a topic. Further reading of a textbook is expected for you to gain wider and deeper knowledge and understanding.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.
    Students are reminded that the overall workload for a full time student as stated in the University of Adelaide Calendar is an average of 48 hours per week per teaching period (i.e. semester). This includes contact and non-contact hours and includes general study and research time for assignments. Biology of Disease II is a 3 unit course and thus represents 1/4 of a full time load. You should thus be putting in an average of 12 hours of study each week (including contact hours) for this course.

    Each week you are expected to
    • attend teaching sessions (lecture sessions, large group tutorials, Small group discovery experience tutorials)
    • read lecture notes and relevant sections of textbooks that relate to lecture material, ensuring that you understand the information, and taking additional notes as necessary
    • revise relevant normal structure and function and other relevant science to aid your understanding of the pathology
    • utilise other available learning resources e.g. pathology websites
    • work on assignments and earlier, rather than later in semester, start to learn/revise the material for examinations
    Learning Activities Summary

    Week

    Topic

    Lectures

    Week 1

    Basic Pathology

    Course Introduction:  What is pathology?

    Cells and how they die

    How and why cells adapt

    Week 2

    Immunopathology

    Basic Immunology
    Inflammation/healing
    Immunopathology/Asthma

    Week 3

    Cardiovascular Pathology

    Heart and vascular system
    Haemodynamics, thrombus, DVT
    Ischemia, Atherosclerosis

    Week 4

    Cardiovascular/Forensic

    Heart pathology

    Tutorial: Cardiovascular review

    Forensic pathology

    Week 5

    Cancer

    Cancer1,2 &3(tutorial)

    Week 6

    Lung Pathology

    Respiratory diseases1,2 &3 (tutorial)

    Week 7

    Central Nervous System

    CNS1,2 & 3 (tutorial)

    Week 8

    Review week 1

    Small Group Discovery Experience tutorials

    ONLINE test

    Week 9

    Liver Pathology, Microbiology

    Liver

    Microbiology

    Large group tutorial

    Week 10

    Infectious diseases and GIT

    Infectious diseases

    GIT1,2

    Week 11

    Review week 2

    Small Group Discovery Experience tutorials

    ONLINE test

    Week 12

    Endocrine related Pathologies

     

    Endocrine, Diabetes

     

    Week 13

    Bone a joint etc

    Bone and Joint, Sexually transmitted disease

    Large group tutorial Exam questions

    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Two (2) Small Group Discovery Experience assignment papers to be completed during the semester, each 15%
    Students will attend one SGDE tutorial before they submit their individual assignment. Before attending the session. they will be expected to have read widely on the topic and be prepared to discuss the topic in the tutorial. They will have 1-2 weeks after the tutorial to prepare their concise assignment report. Topics will be selected by the tutor (experiences member of the academic staff) and be related to the tutors research interests.

    The assignment will be
         • On the topic of a common disease or aspect of a common disease related to the tutors area of research (eg. arthritis, bowel cancer, dementia, etc.). Students will research the topic and discover in depth about the pathology as well as our current research in the field.
         • Maximum 1000 words
         • Sections
              o Significance and epidemiology
              o Pathogenesis (cell and tissue level)
              o Outcomes and other tissue effects if untreated
              o Treatments (include a treatment introduced in the last decade)
              o Current prognosis with therapy
         • Reports can contain 1 figure but it must be original. This can be hand drawn but must be neat. It can be based on a published work but this must be acknowledged and referenced. It should be attached to the assignment on a separate page to the report
         • There should be at least 3 references in the reference list. These must be published peer reviewed articles listed on Medline. No web sites or text books.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Two online test to be completed during the semester (2.5% each) Summative 5% 1-4
    Two Small Group Discovery Experience assignment papers to be completed during the semester (15% each) Summative 30% 2-7
    Written theory examination at the end of the semester Summative 65% 1-4
    Assessment Related Requirements
    In order to pass Biology of Disease II, students are required to have completed all components of the assessment, achieve a grade of at least 40% in the end of semester written examination, and achieve an overall grade of at least 50% for the course. Students failing to meet these requirements may either fail outright or be required to sit a replacement examination.
    Assessment Detail

    All assessments are summative. Assignments and examinations will be graded using marks. The total possible mark for each will be specified on the assignment/examination. Marks for individual questions in the examinations will be stated on the question paper. The marks give a guide as to how much you should write in your answer. Don’t assume that, for example, 3 marks means that only 3 points/facts must be covered in the answer. Three marks just means that you need not give as much or as detailed information as for a 10 mark question for example.
    Results from assessments will be placed into the Grade Centre in MyUni.

    Small Group Discovery Experience (SGDE) Assignments
    Students will be required to complete 2 research assignments. These will be explained in detail in the first introductory lecture. One assignment is due at the mid semester break and the other at end of semester. Students will attend one SGDE tutorial before they submit their individual work. Before attending the session they will be expected to have read widely on the topic and be prepared to discuss the topic in the tutorial. They will have 1-2 weeks after the tutorial to prepare their concise assignment report. Topics will be selected by the tutor (experiences member of the academic staff) and be related to the tutors research interests.

    We are expecting around 200 students so they will be divided into 2 and have half on Monday and the other half on Tuesday. We will have 10-11 groups on each day of ~9 students. Each tutor will have 4 SGDE tutorials (4 different groups ~9 students) on:

    Monday (TBA) September (Group A)
    Tuesday (TBA) September (Group B)

    Monday (TBA) October (Group A)
    Tuesday (TBA) October (Group B)

         • The topic should be a common disease or other topic related to the tutors research (eg. arthritis, bowel cancer, dementia, etc.). The idea is the students will research the topic and discover more about the pathology. In short the student will research and produce a fact sheet on the disease.
         • Maximum 1000 words
         • Sections
              o Significance and epidemiology
              o Pathogenesis (cell and tissue level)
              o Outcomes and other tissue effects if untreated
              o Treatments (include a treatment introduced in the last decade)
              o Current prognosis with therapy
         • Reports can contain 1 figure but it must be original. This can be hand drawn but must be neat. It can be based on a published work but this must be acknowledged and referenced. It should be attached to the assignment on a separate page to the report
         • There should be at least 3 references in the reference list. These must be published peer reviewed articles listed on Medline. No web sites or text books.
         • The SGDE will be 30% (15% each) of total marks
    The assignment will include a tutorial involvement component (~3% of the 15% in each assignment).

    Penalties will apply for late submission of assignments unless an extension with appropriate reasons and supporting documentation (e.g. medical certificate) is provided to the course coordinator BEFORE the due date and time of submission. Otherwise, submission up to 3 days late will result in a loss of 50% of your assignment mark and submission later than this will result in no marks being awarded. Only significant circumstances, such as the death of a close relative or friend, major psychological difficulties or major changes in personal circumstances beyond the control of the student will be considered in the granting of extensions for compassionate reasons.

    The assignments aim to assess understanding of the topics covered, in addition to factual knowledge. Certain questions may be aimed at promoting your revision of relevant background health sciences. The questions will generally be based on, but will not be exclusively from, material covered in lectures. Answering the questions will require you to use textbooks in addition to lecture notes. Free access websites e.g. Wikipedia are NOT to be used as reference sources for assignments.

    Referencing in assignments
    Answers should be written in your own words to demonstrate your personal understanding and should be referenced where appropriate. It is not appropriate to use sentences straight from a textbook, journal article or website, or even to just reorganise a sentence or change a few words from information in a textbook, journal article or website. Information obtained from reference sources should be extensively rewritten to demonstrate your understanding of the topic.

    Appropriate referencing is important for academic integrity. It is important that the contribution of the work of others is acknowledged, it provides evidence to support your argument and it provides evidence that you are not plagiarising. The reader should be able to consult the exact source of your information if they wish. You should ensure that your reference includes the information that you are stating it contains. When using a journal article as a reference, you should have read the entire article, not just the abstract.

    All sources used for obtaining information should be referenced, including lecture notes. Each reference must be indicated in the text and in a reference list at the end of the assignment. When referencing use the Harvard style, information on which can be found on the web. There are specific guidelines for referencing journal articles and chapters from textbooks. Page numbers containing information obtained from books, in addition to journals, should be stated.

    Please ensure that you have read the University’s Policies on Plagiarism and Cheating in Examinations and Related Forms of Assessment. It is each student’s responsibility to read and follow the instructions distributed by the university, school and discipline, including course guides and those related to assessment tasks. These include referencing requirements. Ignorance of appropriate practices, carelessness in note taking and referencing, and finishing an assignment in a hurry are not excuses for inappropriate referencing. For those students requiring further information on this topic, the University of South Australia has a good site at: http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/learningconnection/student/studying/referencing.asp


    End of semester examination
    The end of semester examination will comprise a 2 hour written paper (with an additional 10 minutes reading time). The examination will aim to examine the depth of a student’s understanding of the topics that have been covered during the semester. To do well in the exam students are encouraged to read widely on the topics and study, rather than just learning lecture handouts.

    Submission
    Penalties will apply for late submission of assignments unless an extension can be granted for appropriate reasons. The details that apply for this can be obtained from the following web site http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/pdfs/maca_medical_compassionate_info.pdf . This should be applied for BEFORE the due date and time of submission. Otherwise, submission up to 3 days late will result in a loss of 50% of your assignment mark and submission later than this will result in no marks being awarded.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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