AGRIBUS 7055 - Global Food and Agricultural Markets

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2016

International food and agricultural markets have changed dramatically over the last several decades due to technological change, increased international trade, industry integration, consolidation and regulation, and issues such as increasing disposable incomes, food safety and environmental concerns. The agri-food system has evolved from producing and selling primarily homogeneous agricultural commodities to focusing more on value-adding, differentiation and coordination with other firms in the food chain. In order to remain competitive, some agribusiness firms are developing more of a marketing orientation, focusing increasingly on product development to meet heterogeneous consumer preferences and distinct market segments. The dynamic and increasingly global nature of food systems increases the need for sophisticated skills in market analysis, market planning and marketing management. This course approaches global food and agricultural marketing from a managerial perspective. The unique technical aspects of food and agricultural production, processing, distribution, wholesaling and markets are integrated with business marketing principles and strategy. Students will gain an understanding of the unique and changing structural, institutional, organizational and political aspects of food chains, as well as the fundamental economic theories and concepts necessary for analysis of global food and agricultural markets. Business marketing principles are then applied with strategic marketing extensions, and a focus on the final consumer of food products.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code AGRIBUS 7055
    Course Global Food and Agricultural Markets
    Coordinating Unit Centre for Global Food and Resources
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Assumed Knowledge Basic understanding of Agriculture & food production &/or business principles
    Course Description International food and agricultural markets have changed dramatically over the last several decades due to technological change, increased international trade, industry integration, consolidation and regulation, and issues such as increasing disposable incomes, food safety and environmental concerns. The agri-food system has evolved from producing and selling primarily homogeneous agricultural commodities to focusing more on value-adding, differentiation and coordination with other firms in the food chain. In order to remain competitive, some agribusiness firms are developing more of a marketing orientation, focusing increasingly on product development to meet heterogeneous consumer preferences and distinct market segments. The dynamic and increasingly global nature of food systems increases the need for sophisticated skills in market analysis, market planning and marketing management. This course approaches global food and agricultural marketing from a managerial perspective. The unique technical aspects of food and agricultural production, processing, distribution, wholesaling and markets are integrated with business marketing principles and strategy. Students will gain an understanding of the unique and changing structural, institutional, organizational and political aspects of food chains, as well as the fundamental economic theories and concepts necessary for analysis of global food and agricultural markets. Business marketing principles are then applied with strategic marketing extensions, and a focus on the final consumer of food products.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Risti Permani

    Name: Dr. Di Zeng
    Location: Room 5.24, Level 5 Nexus 10
    Telephone: 8313 6226 (work, email preferred)
    Email: di.zeng@adelaide.edu.au
    Consultation hours: Tuesday 9am-11am
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Course aims are to provide students with:

    1. An understanding of the fundamental principles of economics and marketing as they relate to global food markets;
    2. An understanding of the relationship between food marketing, domestic and international trade policy, food security, nutrition, and resource and environmental issues from a global and business management perspective;
    3. The ability to apply relevant conceptual frameworks and analytical tools necessary to predict and explain market and consumer behaviour and make business management decisions;
    4. A sound understanding of the principles and methods necessary to interpret and evaluate research projects and results relating to marketing and the operation of international agricultural and food markets.
     
    Course objectives are for students to gain knowledge and skills to:

    1. Understand and identify the characteristics and economic functions of the various upstream and downstream firms and institutions involved in various global food and agricultural marketing systems;
    2. Appreciate the importance and the complexity of the agricultural and food marketing system to the global economy;
    3. Analyse, evaluate and explain the market forces that affect agricultural commodity and food product supply, demand and price discovery;
    4. Understand the role of markets and marketing in coordinating economic activities within the global food and agricultural marketing system;
    5. Analyse and evaluate the relationship and impact on selected food and agricultural sectors of different types of market structure on market conduct and market performance;
    6. Understand the role and effects of government policy and regulation in food and agricultural marketing;
    7. Understand the increasingly important role of product differentiation and product marketing rather than commodity marketing as consumers and supermarkets become more demanding of global food and agricultural marketers;
    8. Apply their understanding of economic and marketing theory and analytical tools in order to evaluate various marketing issues, explain consumer behaviour and commodity and food product prices.
    9. Improve their written and oral communication abilities to help them work effectively in an agribusiness environment;
    10. Develop teamwork and leadership skills, solve problems and anticipate opportunities in international agribusiness.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-8
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1-10
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    9-10
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1-10
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    2-10
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    10
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    It is recommended that student also read, view or listen to other material on the topic so they can bring different points of view to class discussions.
    Recommended Resources
    Please refer to MyUni
    Online Learning
    Please refer to MyUni
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course will use a participatory approach. Students are expected to attend all lectures and engage positively. The 3-hour lecture will use a combination of a regular lecture format, group discussion sessions, interactive games and guest lecturer sessions. The course will make extensive use of MyUni. Students must check MyUni and their email account regularly.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The University expects full-time students (i.e. those taking 12 units per semester) to devote a total of 48 hours per week to their studies. This translates to 12 hours per week for a semester course.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Topics:

    1. Overview of the food system and global food markets

    2. Economics of the food system and market structure

    3. Food and agricultural price analysis

    4. Impact of changing structure of agricultural markets

    5. International trade and comparative advantage

    6. Strategic market planning and the business plan

    7. Agriculture and food product market research

    8. Market risks and regulation

    9. Future challenges for agrifood markets


    A list of the topics covered each week will be posted on MyUni.
    Specific Course Requirements
    N/A
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT TASK COLLABORATIVE / INDIVIDUAL WEIGHTING WORD COUNT/TIME DUE DATE LEARNING OUTCOME

    Essay 1

    Individual

    15%

    1500 words

    3:45pm Tuesday week 5

    1-5,9

    Essay 2

    Individual

    15%

    1500 words

    3:45pm Tuesday week 12
    6-8,9
    Group assignment 1:
    Handout and presentation

    Collaborative 15% 2-3 pages handout and
    15 minutes presentation
    To be decided in week 1: handout
    and ppt 5pm on presentation day
    1-10

    Group assignment 2: A blog post

    Collaborative 10% 500-600 word blog post and
    an image
    3:45 Tuesday
    Week 7
    1-10
    Quiz Individual 5% 30 minutes Lecture time in
    week 8
    1-5
    Final Examnination Individual 40% 2-3 hours Lecture time in
    week 13
    1-8
    Assessment Related Requirements
    You must submit all assignments to pass this course.
    Assessment Detail
    Please refer to ‘Attachment to the Course Outline’ on MyUni.
    Submission
    Assignments must be submitted in:

    Softcopy through Turnitin on MyUni AND hardcopy through the assignment dropbox for essay submission.

    Your assignment MUST include the GF assignment cover sheet which can be downloaded from MyUni under “Assignments”. Each page must be numbered with your student ID and name.

    All assignments must be presented professionally with clear headings, appropriate referencing and using one and a half spacing.

    Extensions will only be granted if requests are received in writing to the course coordinator at least 24 hours before the final due date unless they are requested on medical or compassionate grounds and are supported by appropriate documents.

    Please contact the course coordinator, preferably by email, at any time to make an appointment for assistance or guidance in relation to course work, assignments or any concerns that may arise. Assignments will normally be returned two weeks after they have been submitted.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.