AGRIBUS 7057 - Trends & Issues in the World Food System

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2016

Constantly evolving market forces and ever changing local, national, regional and international policies influence food and agricultural systems. At the same time, continually evolving socioeconomic trends shape and influence public policies. An important aim of this course is to explore, research, and analyse how key change agents and public policies impact on businesses, firms, households, producers, retailers, traders, consumers and governments. Issues we address include economic development, growth, trade, technology, food safety, nutrition, health, diet, intellectual property rights, environment, finance, supermarkets and risk. This seminar based course motivates students to grapple with the same kinds of decisions and dilemmas policy makers and business leaders confront. Students both absorb information, strategies and concepts and practice teamwork skills to resolve issues and problems.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code AGRIBUS 7057
    Course Trends & Issues in the World Food System
    Coordinating Unit Centre for Global Food and Resources
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description Constantly evolving market forces and ever changing local, national, regional and international policies influence food and agricultural systems. At the same time, continually evolving socioeconomic trends shape and influence public policies. An important aim of this course is to explore, research, and analyse how key change agents and public policies impact on businesses, firms, households, producers, retailers, traders, consumers and governments. Issues we address include economic development, growth, trade, technology, food safety, nutrition, health, diet, intellectual property rights, environment, finance, supermarkets and risk. This seminar based course motivates students to grapple with the same kinds of decisions and dilemmas policy makers and business leaders confront. Students both absorb information, strategies and concepts and practice teamwork skills to resolve issues and problems.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Randy Stringer

    Randy Stringer
    Room 5.06
    10 Pulteney St
    randy.stringer@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1) Enhance your conceptual skills to better analyse how global trends and international policy responses impact food and agriculture.

    2) Build on knowledge gained from prior courses, integrating an international perspective into informed decision making.

    3) Improve communication capacities, especially writing and presenting, for working more effectively in today’s business environment.

    4) Demonstrate practical applications of policy analysis to assess global issues, evaluate options, reach decisions, and present results.

    5) Acquire a global perspective on how businesses, governments and NGOs adapt to evolving agricultural and food systems.

    6) By the time you finish this course, you should be comfortable writing concise summaries of international developments affecting the agriculture sector and making succinct presentations to decision makers, policy makers, and NGOs.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    2,6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1-3
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    2,4
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    2,3,5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    2,5,6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    2-6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Required readings are provided on the course website. There is no required textbook for this course.
    Recommended Resources
    This is a wide-ranging course. The reading list key literaure and epirical studies that support and/or challenge what you hear in the lecture.  You are expected to follow up the references to articles or books and read widely agricultural business and agricultural development journals.

    For background information on the more industrial countries agricultural sectors visit OECD’s and WTO’s web pages. For developing and emerging economies, visit the World Bank’s and FAO’s web pages.

    Australian government, industry bodies and NGOs present an abundant supply of excellent information and analysis on international developments on their web pages.
    Online Learning
    Power-point slides for each lecture are made available on MyUni. So too are all the required readings related to each lecture.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Two teaching methods are used. The first hour or so is a lecture/discussion format covering a specific global topic. Each topic represents a current international policy question, social issue or business strategy.

    The second half of class involves seminar/collaborative learning methods. The seminar sessions include group and individual presentations, with interactions, assessments, comments and critical analysis provided by all students. The lectures and seminar sessions guide and inform the group and individual assignments.

    The seminars are designed to motivate students to grapple with the same kinds of decisions and dilemmas managers and policymakers confront. Seminars create a classroom to both absorb information, strategies and concepts and to practice the skills of teamwork in the face of real problems.

    Learning and teaching for this course includes self-directed learning exercises and tasks. Students are expected to take an independent approach to learning by doing all prescribed readings associated with course material.

    I want you to learn, enjoy and succeed in this course. This means I need you to ask questions when confused, to read and prepare for class, to be present and on time and to participate. I expect you to be an active learner. I can guide, motivate and teach, but learning is up to you.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Contact time consists of 9 lectures= 36 hours
    First paper = 16 hours
    Second paper = 18 hours
    Presentations = 26 hours
    Background Reading = 60 hours
    Total 156 hours


    Learning Activities Summary
    The course will be taught over an intensive three week period.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Some tutorial questions encourage students to work in small groups. Opportunities for small groups to work on project reports.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Op-ed assignments 25%
    Positition Paper 25%
    Team Project 20%
    Presentations 20%
    Individual Participation 10%
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Attendance is required for all tutorials. The seminar sessions include group and individual presentations, with interactions, assessments, comments and critical analysis provided by all students. Willingness to communicate and interact in the classroom is essential.
    Assessment Detail
    Presentation guidelines are announced in class and can be found on MyUni.

    General guidelines for the first and second reports.

    Students are are required to either analyse an agricultural or food related policy issue or socio-economic trend affecting the agricultural sector in a country, region or global level.

    The report is presented using 12 point font and 1.5 line spacing. The maximum word limit is , 2,000.

    Marking guidance: (i) style and presentation are 20%; (ii) integrating course-developed skills is 20%; and (iii) content and analysis are 60%.
    Submission
    Assignments must be submitted in:

    1.  Softcopy through Turnitin on MyUni

    Your assignment MUST include the GF assignment cover sheet which can be downloaded from MyUni under “Assignments”. Each page must be numbered with your student ID and name.

    All assignments must be presented professionally with clear headings, appropriate referencing and using one and a half spacing.

    Extensions will only be granted if requests are received in writing to the course coordinator at least 24 hours before the final due date unless they are requested on medical or compassionate grounds and are supported by appropriate documents.

    Please contact the course coordinator, preferably by email, at any time to make an appointment for assistance or guidance in relation to course work, assignments or any concerns that may arise. Assignments will normally be returned two weeks after they have been submitted.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.