CLAS 1003 - Introduction to Ancient Greek and Roman History

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2021

This introduces students to key aspects and events in ancient Greek and Roman history, and to some of the main historians of Greece and Rome. It is designed to form the necessary background for our upper-level courses in archaeology and ancient history. Firstly, we will explore the development of city-states in 6th & 5th c. BC Greece, with an emphasis upon the achievements of Athens in the Classical period. Students will be introduced to the history-writing of Herodotus & Thucydides. They will also explore how other types of primary sources - drama, comedy, philosophical essays and archaeological evidence - help us to understand Athenian concepts of state-identity, the role of the citizen and of government in their lives. Secondly, we will explore key moments in the history of Rome down to the early Empire. Again, emphasis will be upon understanding how to use our primary sources to understand the past. For instance, we will use Cicero's letters and essays to understand elite social and political networking in the Late Republic, the civil wars of Pompey and Caesar. How did Roman historians such as Livy, Suetonius and Tacitus differ from their Greek counterparts? How can we use surviving forms of evidence - material, epigraphic, literary - to understand what was important to the political and social life of Romans?

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code CLAS 1003
    Course Introduction to Ancient Greek and Roman History
    Coordinating Unit Classics
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description This introduces students to key aspects and events in ancient Greek and Roman history, and to some of the main historians of Greece and Rome. It is designed to form the necessary background for our upper-level courses in archaeology and ancient history.
    Firstly, we will explore the development of city-states in 6th & 5th c. BC Greece, with an emphasis upon the achievements of Athens in the Classical period. Students will be introduced to the history-writing of Herodotus & Thucydides. They will also explore how other types of primary sources - drama, comedy, philosophical essays and archaeological evidence - help us to understand Athenian concepts of state-identity, the role of the citizen and of government in their lives.
    Secondly, we will explore key moments in the history of Rome down to the early Empire. Again, emphasis will be upon understanding how to use our primary sources to understand the past. For instance, we will use Cicero's letters and essays to understand elite social and political networking in the Late Republic, the civil wars of Pompey and Caesar. How did Roman historians such as Livy, Suetonius and Tacitus differ from their Greek counterparts? How can we use surviving forms of evidence - material, epigraphic, literary - to understand what was important to the political and social life of Romans?
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Margaret O'Hea

    Classics staff who contribute to this course:

    Dr Margaret O'Hea
    Prof. Han Baltussen

    There may also be other tutors in this course. More details, and contact information, will be available on MyUni at the start of the teaching semester.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Lectures
    There are up to 2 hours of online lectures per week for all 12 weeks - sometimes a single lectures, sometimes two smaller ones. These are videos. They are usually released on a week-by-week basis.  Don't skimp on this, or leave them to binge-watch. Set aside time within your own schedule, each week. Their content  is the spine to the course.

    Seminar

    We call this a "Flipped Class", and this is held every fortnight, starting in All students must attend this class. Content varies - you may be asked to read an excerpt then discuss with a classmate, as prep for an upcoming tutorial. We may collectively review material from previous weeks, to allow for Q and A arising from lectures. You won't know until you are there.
    Tutorials
    Thisis a weekly class, held for 10 of the 12 weeks during the semester. Check on MyUni for dates.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    1 Demonstrate familiarity with core features of Classical Athenian cultural history 
    2 Demonstrate an historical understanding of the cultural and social tensions between increasingly-defined "public" and "private' spheres in democratic Athens (5th-4th centuries BC);
    3 Demonstrate an historical understanding of key episodes of Roman cultural and political history;
    4 Demonstrate an ability to evaluate the usefulness and relevance of different types of historical or textual evidence;
    5 Demonstrate an ability to construct a well-developed argument based on fragmentary historical and archaeological evidence;
    6 Demonstrate knowledge of the scholarly techniques of presenting your written work.

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    4, 5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    5, 6
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    4, 5, 6
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1, 2, 3
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    5, 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    There is no required textbook for this course: readings will be available in MyUni from the BSL (library).
    Recommended Resources
    N/A
    Online Learning
    The online lectures provide background to the material being studied in class, both in the weekly "flipped class" (for all students) and in the tutorial programme. It is very important that students keep up with their online viewing and note-taking from these online lectures. Do not leave them to the end of semester.

    Weekly readings for the tutorial programme will be accessed online. A "brick" (of printed-out readings) is not available for this course.

    Students can download the tutorial programme, which lists the tutorial topics and readings, week by week, from MyUni or buy it as a Course booklet from the university's online shop at the start of semester. This booklet also includes guides to writing your assignments in the Dept of Classics, Archaeology and Ancient History, and a summary of your assessment.

    All this material, and more, will all be on MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    • Flipped Class (timetabled as a "seminar") - for review of course material
    • Tutorials, focussed on the topics and readings in the tutorial programme
    • Online lectures (up to two hours per week) - students should take notes from these lectures, and add to notes from background readings and tutorial readings.

    For full details of the schedule, see MyUni at the start of the semester.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    WORKLOAD
    Type Overall Hours Average per week
    Flipped classroom & tutorials 24 2
    Viewing online lectures 24 2
    Private reading 54 4.5
    Written work 42 3.5
    Revision 12 1
    total 156 13
    Learning Activities Summary
    The full program will be available on MyUni at the start of semester.
    Specific Course Requirements
    Although the lectures are fully online, this is emphatically a hands-on course that requires regular attendance at the flipped classroom and tutorials.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    The weekly Tuesday "lecture" timeslot will vary in format from week to week, but some will include forming small groups and analysing a primary source that is provided to you in the class. You will be asked to work together, and discuss your findings to the rest of the class.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Due Weighting Learning Outcome
    Short assignment (ca 750-800 words) Formative
    & summative

    tba

    10% 1-6
    1500-1600 word tutorial paper 1 Formative and Summative

    within first half of semester

    30% 1-6
    1500-1600 word tutorial paper 2 Formative and Summative within second half of semester 40% 1-6
    in-class test Summative within teaching semester 10% 1-6
    online quiz Summative within teaching semester 10% 1-6
    For the tutorial papers, students must choose one Greek topic and one Roman topic. The due date is the Monday of the week when this will be discussed in class. Although not graded, all students who write on a topic will be expected to start of the informal discussion at that tutorial.
    First tutorial paper:  Choose one Greek tutorial topic. Submit online by Monday 11.59 pm of the week when that topic is discussed in tutorials. Submit as an attached pdf or Word document - max. 12 point font, max 1.5 line spacing. No other formats are accepted. You must use citations, and bibliography, in the format that we provide to you in this course. See MyUni course material for more details.
    Second tutorial paper: Choose one Roman tutorial topic. Submit online by Monday 11.59 pm of the week when that topic is discussed in tutorials. Submit as an attached pdf or Word document - max. 12 point font, max 1.5 line spacing. No other formats are accepted. You must use citations,  and bibliography, in the format that we provide
    to you in this course. See MyUni course material for more details.

    Short tests: there will be two tests within this course. Both are designed to test your memory and grasp of basic historical data - names, places, order of events.  One will be held in the Seminar (aka Flipped Class) fortnightly sessions, in class. Notification of date will be available online via MyUni. The other one  will be online and administered within Canvas (MyUni), will take no more than an hour and will be focussed on testing basic knowledge of dates and events in a simple way. See MyUni for dates
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Regular attendance at tutorials and the weekly general class/flipped clasroom is necessary for the successful completion of this course, because the compulsory end-of-semester exam covers all the course material, including the non-recorded discussions in the Tuesday flipped classroom and the weekly tutorial meetings.  You will be required to answer at least one question in the exam that is not based on your two tutorial papers.
    Assessment Detail
    Critique  The point of this exercise is to show that you have read and understood three secondary readings on a particular tutorial topic, and that you can use the Harvard Citation and Bibliography system as provided to you on MyUni for this course.It
    is both quantitatively and qualitatively different from a tutorial  paper.  More details will be provided in the first week's tutorial - ensure that you attend!

    Tutorial papers  You must submit two tutorial papers, each 1500-1600 words in length, and each on one of these tutorial
    topics.  There are ten weeks of tutorials, and so 10 topics from which to choose.  These fall into two sections: Greek and Roman. You must: 
    a.  Write your 1st tutorial paper on a Greek topic chosen from Weeks 3-6
    b.  Write your 2nd tutorial paper on a Roman topic chosen from Weeks 8-12 

    Both papers must be in essay format, although they are shorter and so slightly less detailed than an essay. You must use the reading list provided for the topic that you are writing up, which will usually include both ancient sources and modern secondary works. If you wish to go into more detail, use the reading lists (bibliographies) provided by those modern works to go further. You will submit the tutorial paper  by 11.59 pm on the Monday of the week when that topic is discussed in your tutorial class. More details will be available in MyUni for this course.

    2-hour formal exam  This exam is held in the University's formal exam period. All the answers are in essay form (no multiple-choice questions).   More information will be available in MyUni.
    • NB:   You, and you alone, must find out your exam dates and times from the University’s Exams website. Don’t rely on a friend. If they get it wrong, so you do and there are no alternative arrangements for missing an exam because you mistook the date, time or venue.
    •  Don’t book a holidaythat falls within the exam timetable, including the supplementary (replacement) exam period. That will be 40% of your final mark down the drain, because we will not provide an alternative date foryour convenience.
    • Supplementary exams are for people who submit the appropriate application form, along with documentary evidence within 5 working days of the exam to the Faculty Office - not to your tutor or course coordinator - on convincing medical or compassionate grounds. Those who get a mark between 45-49% overall also automatically get a supp. offer, provided that they have submitted all three written assignments.
    • We do not offer take-home exams, or any alternative assessment to the formal written exam. This is non-negotiable.
    Submission
    The critique and both tutorial papers are to be submitted online, in MyUni for this course.

    Late submission:   A flat -2% per day applies if you submit after the due date and time without prior approval of an extension.
    For example, say you receive the mark of 16/20 for your first tutorial paper, but it was submitted 7 days late. Your mark 16/20 = 80%; -2% x 7 days = -14%, so your adjusted, penalised mark would be 80-14 = 66%, or 13.2/20. 

    Papers that are more than 7 days late are not marked, and a score of 0 will be entered.

    Asking for an Extension:
    Use the MACA form which can be accessed from here - follow the instructions, but submit directly to the Faculty Office either via email
    or in person.  Valid reasons for being granted an extension are given on the form - other due assignments, minor respiratory ailments, or work clashes are  not among them.
    The submission must be in advance of the due date, within normal business hours and during the working week (so, not Sunday at 11.30 pm). If granted, a standard extension will normally be between 3-5 days, with longer extensions only in extenuating circumstances (for example, hospitalisation). In the case of a paper due in the last week of semester, note that the university policy is that extensions cannot extend beyond the last day of teaching in the semester. 

    Disability Access Plans If you have an Access Plan, you must notify each and every course coordinator about it, at the start of each and every semester. Ensure that you fully understand what is possible and not possible, as far as extensions go. Note that exemptions from regular attendance at tutorials (up to 20 students) and the flipped classroom (the full cohort) is not possible for this course. Note, too, that there is a compulsory end-of-semester 2-hour exam, for which there are no alternative forms of assessment. Having an Access Plan  does not grant automatic rights to an extension. They  must be applied for in the designated way before the due date for the assignment.  In addition, if you have an Access Plan, but need an extension on different medical grounds then you should submit the MACA form in the normal way. Consult with your Liaison Office if you have any queries.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    The course will make use of SELT for course and teacher evaluation.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.