MARKETNG 7034 - Supply Chain Logistics (M)

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

A course in Business Logistics in the broader context of Supply Chain Management (SCM). The main thrust of the course is to study the management concepts, principles and the activities involved in making products and services available to customers in a competitive way. Hence, the course examines the process of planning, coordinating/implementing, and controlling the flow and storage of raw materials, in-process inventory, finished goods, and related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption as a business/firm tries to gain competitive advantage in creating value and meeting customers' requirements in an efficient and effective way. From obtaining raw materials to delivery of the finished product to the customer, the flow of material and information can be into, through and out of the firm (inbound/outbound, or forward/reverse, and internal/external), forming a multi-stage production-distribution network. Efficient and effective management of such a network requires a systems approach, along with skills and know-how, particularly, in economics, marketing, purchasing, engineering (including production/outsourcing and IT), transportation, inventory control and warehousing, and decision-making techniques, as well as strategic thinking. The course integrates relevant concepts from these areas in an attempt to provide a more complete view of supply chains and business logistics. The methods used to convey and develop these ideas will include a mix of traditional lecture, interactive class discussions of topics, and team-based case studies/presentations.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MARKETNG 7034
    Course Supply Chain Logistics (M)
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Semester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Course Description A course in Business Logistics in the broader context of Supply Chain Management (SCM). The main thrust of the course is to study the management concepts, principles and the activities involved in making products and services available to customers in a competitive way. Hence, the course examines the process of planning, coordinating/implementing, and controlling the flow and storage of raw materials, in-process inventory, finished goods, and related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption as a business/firm tries to gain competitive advantage in creating value and meeting customers' requirements in an efficient and effective way.
    From obtaining raw materials to delivery of the finished product to the customer, the flow of material and information can be into, through and out of the firm (inbound/outbound, or forward/reverse, and internal/external), forming a multi-stage production-distribution network. Efficient and effective management of such a network requires a systems approach, along with skills and know-how, particularly, in economics, marketing, purchasing, engineering (including production/outsourcing and IT), transportation, inventory control and warehousing, and decision-making techniques, as well as strategic thinking. The course integrates relevant concepts from these areas in an attempt to provide a more complete view of supply chains and business logistics. The methods used to convey and develop these ideas will include a mix of traditional lecture, interactive class discussions of topics, and team-based case studies/presentations.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Ercan Tirtiroglu

    Name: Ercan TIRTIROGLU, Ph.D. (Professor of Operations Management & Decision Sciences)
    Office Location: 10 Pulteney Street, Room 10.23
    Telephone: (0)8 8313 4513
    Email: ercan.tirtiroglu@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Website:  www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au

    Ercan Tirtiroglu joined Uni Adelaide in June 2011 (having spent the 2009-2010 academic year at Uni Adelaide on sabbatical leave from the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth; his previous post for 22 years). His teaching and research interests include Operations Management and Supply Chains, Decision Theory/Operations Research, Quality/Statistical Control Methods, Marketing Science, and Research Methods. He has a particular interest in applying entropy and information theory concepts and principles, especially in Operations and Decision-Theoretic contexts. Professor Tirtiroglu earned a Ph.D. in Administrative & Engineering Systems, and MS in Operations Research (both at Union College and University, NY), as well as MA in Marketing at Bosphorus University (Istanbul), and B.Sc. in Industrial Management at METU (Middle East Technical University) in Ankara, Turkey. In addition to Uni Adelaide and UMass Dartmouth, he has held faculty positions at St. John Fisher College (Rochester, NY), and the State University of New York (at SUNY-New Paltz, and SUNY-Albany campuses), and visiting professorships at Bosphorus University, and at Concordia University (Montreal). His professional experience also includes consulting in productivity and quality control, as well as in marketing research (particularly with respect to data gathering and data quality, and sales forecasting). Professor Tirtiroglu is a member of DSI (Decision Sciences Institute), INFORMS (the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences), a senior member of ASQ (American Society for Quality), as well as a “now-virtual” member of BCASA (American Statistical Association-Boston Chapter), and maintains his long-ongoing affiliation with the Statistical Quality, Decision Analysis, Marketing Science, and Applied Probability special interest groups and/or divisions of these professional societies. Dr. Tirtiroglu has written numerous journal and proceedings papers on various areas of interest to him, including operations management and supply chains, quality, finance, information-theory, and marketing. He is an Editorial Board (EB) member of the International Journal of Services and Operations Management, International Journal of Operational Research and a former EB member of The Journal of Educators Online. He also serves as a referee/reviewer for a number of scholarly journals in his research interest areas.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    (Subject to changes / Assumes 40 enrolled students, forming 8 groups of 5 students per group / Any changes will most likely result in case and/or chapter assignments per group to increase, as the coverage is meant to remain unchanged.)
    In using the table below, be sure to note and prepare for the coming week’s coverage as we go along.

    Wk/Session What’s planned and/or to be done:
    1 ▪ Introduction (and “course housekeeping” matters ⁄ forming of groups)
    Prof. Tirtiroglu: Preliminary OM, SC, and Logistics concepts (Chps. 1 & 14)
    ▪ How to prepare for cases (Case 14.2 “Team HDX” assigned to class as “Practice Case” in Wk2)
    Self-directed study: Read Chps. 4, 5, 6, and 13 by September 3rd
    2 Prof. Tirtiroglu: Chps. 1 & 14 continued
    ▪ In-class discussion of the Practice Case: Case 14.2 “Team HDX” (see Chp. 3)
    3 Prof. Tirtiroglu: Chps. 2 & 3 (Logistics in Supply Chains / Global Supply Chains)
    4 Prof. Tirtiroglu: Chps. 2 & 3 continued
    Group 1: Chp. 7 (Demand Management; omitting pages 222-234 on forecasting techniques)
    Prof. Tirtiroglu: Supplementary lecture/remarks
    5 Group 2: Chp. 8 (Order Mgmt. & Customer Service)
    Prof. Tirtiroglu: Supplementary lecture/remarks (including inventory-related preliminaries)
    6 Group 3: Case 4.1 “CoLinx, LLC”
    Group 4: Chp. 10 (Transportation)
    Prof. Tirtiroglu: Chp. 9 (Inventory Mgmt. in Supply Chains – to be covered over the next few sessions)
    7 Group 5: Chp. 11 (Distribution)
    Group 6: Case 5.1 “CPDW”
    Prof. Tirtiroglu: Supplementary lecture/remarks
    8 Group 7: Case 6.2: “Catnap”
    Prof. Tirtiroglu: Supplementary lecture/remarks
    Initial review of progress on Group Projects (poor progress will likely affect the final project score by up to 30%)
    Semester Break
    9 Group 8: Case 13.2: “Durable Vinyl Siding Corporation”
    Prof. Tirtiroglu: Supplementary lecture/remarks
    10 Prof. Tirtiroglu: Chp. 16 (Supply Chain Strategic Challenges)
    11 Project Presentations − may continue into the next week
    12 General Review and wrap-up / Questions and Answers / and any remaining presentations
    Exams’ Block: NOV. 08 – 22 (Final Exam date & time to be confirmed)

    PLEASE NOTE: Additional material (journal articles, etc.) should be expected (typically via MyUni).


  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    The course aims for the students to:
    1. learn the essential supply chain and logistics concepts and terms/terminology, including material and information flows, warehousing, stock control, and distribution channels,
    2. learn the fundamental business aspects of how most goods are created today and into the future,
    3. learn the relationships between a supply chain and the logistics function,
    4. develop an understanding of the current issues in Supply Chain Management (SCM),
    5. learn that logistics is an enabler, facilitating the movement of goods (and the basics of how products move through the supply networks to the markets, as well as about the coordination and management of this physical distribution and about the main supporting technologies),
    6. learn about the ways by which efficiencies are sought and achieved in transporting, purchasing, warehousing, storing, and other similar and/or related operations,
    7. learn the importance and relevance of competing through the supply chain,
    8. improve their report writing, presentation and discussion skills (through discussion and presentation of a research project, cases, topics, etc.).
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), (g)
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. (d), (f), (g), (h)
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. (b), (c), (d), (f), (h)
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. (a), (e), (f), (h)
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. (b), (g), (h)
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. (d), (f)
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    TEXT: Coyle, John J.; C.J. Langley, Jr.; R.A. Novack; and B.J. Gibson (2013). Supply Chain Management: A Logistics Perspective, 9th ed.; South-Western/Cengage Learning. < ISBN: 978-0-538-47918-9 >.
    Recommended Resources
    ● Alan Harrison, and Remko van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing through the supply chain, 3rd ed. (Essex, England: Pearson Education (FT-Prentice Hall), 2008). < ISBN 978-0-273-71276-3 >.

    ● Martin Christopher, Logistics and Supply Chain Management: Creating Value-Adding Networks, 3rd ed. (Harlow, Great Britain: Pearson Education (FT-Prentice Hall), 2005). < ISBN 978-0-273-768176-2 >.

    ● Class hand-outs (occasional), which may be made available either as hardcopy or through MyUni (please see 3.3 below). These will typically be journal articles and supplementary notes.
    Online Learning
    Various course-related materials to be available at the course website at MyUni can be accessed by logging in at this link: https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/webapps/login/  

    Students should check the MyUni course website at various times every week of the semester for any new uploads. In general, new material will normally be located at the bottom of the “Course Materials” listing at MyUni course website.

    IMPORTANT ; Please note and observe: If contacting the lecturer by email, please use Uni Adelaide email system (others may NOT be honoured).
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course will mainly blend lectures and discussions in a seminar format, and the students will be expected to engage in the course activities through:
    1. taking part in a case or a topic presentation as part of a team,(*)
    2. participating in the class discussions of the cases and topics,(*)
    3. taking active part in class to discuss any assigned readings (such as journal articles),(*)
    4. taking part in a group project (the research component of the course), and in its final presentation.
    (*)In-class participation activity of each student has to reflect appropriate (and in-advance) preparation.

    As lecturer-in-charge, I will supplement these activities with lectures as I see fit (typically, these will be on some technical details and/or on modelling issues, but will generally not be extensive lectures). To state in one sentence, the teaching and learning modes used will be a blend of lectures, self-directed study, team-based presentations (of cases, topics, etc.) and their interactive class discussions, plus a term-project as the research component of the course. (Students interested in further study of the topics covered in the course at a more advanced level are encouraged to consult me.)
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    In-class contact: Up to 3 hours per week
    On student’s own time: 7 to 11 hours per week

    The University expects full-time students (i.e., those taking 12 units per semester) to devote a total of 48 hours per week to their studies. This means that, for a three-unit course, a student is expected to commit about 9 hours of private study outside of regular classes.

    ► Students in this course are expected to attend all lectures throughout the semester.
    Learning Activities Summary
    As per the Course Timetable in section 1.3 above (see page 3). Students should note that the course involves group work, as well as individual work.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    The following summary provides all the required assessment items, applicable to all students in the course:
    Assessment item:                                                        % of total mark:
    Class participation …........................................................... 10%
    Assignment-1 (Group chapter or case presentation)     ……..      10%
    Assignment-2 (Group research project & presentation)  …...      20%
    Assignment-3 (Articles – individual work) ………..................      10% (softcopy due by 2:00 pm, Thu., 11 Sep., 2014)
    Final Examination  .................…………………….................           50%

    ⇒ For further detail, please refer to sections 5.2 and 5.3 below.

    The final exam will be given during the Exams’ Block (date/time to be announced by the university). It will be an “open book” comprehensive exam (on all the material discussed, covered and/or assigned in the course during the semester). A good understanding of the course material and being able to integrate meaningfully the concepts/topics covered will be expected. The exam will, most likely, also include a somewhat short case and its analysis to be done by each student. In addition, a “group peer assessment,” carrying a few bonus points, will likely be part of the final exam (and it may influence, up or down, each individual group member’s evaluation in the group-work category).
    Assessment Related Requirements
    ● Attendance at each class session is expected (attending less than 9 class sessions not a good sign regarding your interest, progress and performance in the course). Note, however, that attendance is more than just physical presence; it requires active engagement and participation. It should also be clear that, for each absence, you’ll be giving up, at a minimum, the opportunity to earn, potentially, one-twelfth, (1/12)th, of the participation points. Please note that I take attendance for record-keeping purposes. Note also that either arriving late or leaving before the class session has ended on 3 occasions is treated as one, (1), absence.

    ● Please show up for class in a timely fashion (i.e., before we start a class session). Also, please note that leaving the session, for instance, during a break and not returning for the remaining part of the session without prior consent from me for a legitimate reason (but even with my consent, if and once this exceeds two occurrences) will translate into a third, (1/3), of an absence for each such occurrence beyond the first two absences by prior consent (without prior consent, each and every such instance will count as a third of an absence).

    ● All mobile phones or similar devices must be put away (out of sight, reach and use), and also either switched off or on silent mode during classes. Each time you violate this will mean that your “Class participation” points will go down by 0.5 (hence, for example, a perfect participation of 10 points will go down to 9.5 with one violation, and down to 9 points with 2 violations, and so on).

    ● It is required that you check and clear with me in advance about laptop use, or recording device (or similar device) use during classes. Otherwise, your individual (Assignment-3) score will be reduced by 50%. The use of such devices should be limited strictly to the course activity in progress during a class session (and each occasion of your inappropriate use will be treated in the same way as mobile phone violation indicated immediately above).

    ● I only use Uni Adelaide email for my courses, and require that you also do so regarding emails to me. If not, your email may not be honoured. Also, any email you send me must have a proper Subject, and include your name on the same line. In addition, please do NOT send an email to me as a “Reply” to an unrelated email I may have sent to the class, or to your group, or to you.

    ● You should check MyUni on different days of the week to monitor any uploads.

    ● If you score less than 42.5% (out of a maximum of 50%) on the Final Exam, you may not earn a grade of HD in the course.
    Assessment Detail
    Whether group-work or not, each student is individually required to study and prepare for each case and/or the chapter that has been assigned (as per the Course Timetable), and prepare a brief report (up to 2 pages of a word-processed report) on it, bringing a hardcopy of it to class on the date it is scheduled to be covered (formatting, style, etc., should follow the “Document Guidelines” uploaded at MyUni). On occasion, you may be asked (on an individual basis) to hand-in your report for the purpose of monitoring and confirming your “in-advance preparation” for class discussions, to help me in forming a “participation” sense about you, which is part of your course grade. If you don’t have your report to hand-in when asked, understand that you won’t get a chance to hand it in at a later time.

    Referring to the Course Timetable (see section 1.3), it should be clear that groups will present either a case or a topic assigned to them, also leading the discussion on it. The presenting group will submit a “written report” of 10 pages or less. The softcopy of it must be emailed to me by 4:00 PM a day in advance (i.e., on Wednesday). Please submit its hardcopy in class right before the assigned case or chapter is to be presented/discussed.

    ● A “Hint” about cases: Generally speaking, a universally accepted and unique “correct answer” does not exist for any case. So, different analyses and answers/recommendations could be valid. However, it is important NOT to make FATAL ERRORS. In this connection, the following are a few helpful points:

    - You should not suggest an action as “remedy” which is sure to worsen the problem. For instance, let’s say the organization involved in the case has a declining sales issue – do not recommend increasing production in order to increase the sales without determining, first, the stock position (or inventory levels), and identifying if the problem is the product’s (un)availability, or the ineffectiveness of the sale-force, or some other (maybe external) factor.

    - Your analysis and comments should be time-consistent or time-pertinent. That is, you should not take a hindsight viewpoint, and provide your comments with today’s knowledge and technology – instead, you should put yourself in the position of a consultant (or a manager, etc.) of the time period of the case, and deal with the case from that vantage point (sometimes, you may have to come up with a best possible guess for the time period of a case).
    - You should refrain from suggesting things far-fetched to be plausible as answers, explanations, and/or assumptions.

    - You should not suggest/recommend everything under the sun (trying to “hit” the target with one of the suggestions).

    - You should not suggest or recommend any action for remediation without identifying, first, the issue/s underlying the symptoms.

    ● Be sure to prepare all your written work carefully, paying particular attention to:
    - the “quality” of style/writing, grammar, etc., and
    - the content quality, and
    - that the content is YOUR OWN, from your own thinking, mental filtration, and in your own wording (plagiarized work will get zero credit for each and every student involved – so, be sure to check each other’s work on the group assignments).

    ● This part is useful for (and directed to) everyone, but it’s especially relevant for a group that will be presenting a case :

    In “doing” the cases, please make use of the questions provided at the end of the case to guide you with your case discussion and analysis, rather than simply answering them. In general, you should employ a format that starts with an overview of the case, followed by identification of the main issue/s (maybe based on a SWOT analysis), and then alternatives or solution approaches your group considers or proposes, followed next by your recommendations, and/or the recommended solution (which alternative/s; when/how/why), as well as its limitations, contingencies, etc.
     
    Projects : The groups will be assigned a supply/logistics (S/L) topic to study and report on. All groups will be assigned the same topic (S/L in the medical field), but with some differences in focus of interest. The marking of the projects will be on a competitive basis (groups will be ranked as best, 2nd best, etc., and scored accordingly, based on each group’s work: project report and its presentation). Basically, each group will examine the supply and logistics processes involved (and how things are getting done for what’s needed to be made available at the demand points), identifying the “flows,” suppliers, procurement, delivery issues, and so on, preferably also mapping (or flow-charting) the S/L activities.

    On 18 September, 2014, each group will give an initial “brief” (a 15-minute or shorter, presentation) on the progress made till then, submitting to me a hardcopy of initial report (10 pages or less) on the work done till then.
    NOTE: The softcopy of the report should be emailed to me by 4:00 PM, Tuesday, 16 September, 2014, with its hardcopy submitted in-class on September 18th.

    Email to me your group’s final project report by 4:00 PM, Wednesday, 22 September, 2014. Presentations will take place in class on Thursday, 23 September, 2014 (all the hardcopy of the reports will be collected from all groups).
    The final report should be no more than 30 pages (the “Document Guidelines” apply) including everything, except the cover sheet (must be signed by each group member).
    Articles : For the purposes of Assignment-3, from the sources/periodical listed below, please select three, (3), business news items (i.e., articles) having a good dose of S/L content (each article you select should be from a different source, and should be from 2011 onward). Email your selections to me, either as a link or as a scan-copy by 4:00 PM, Monday, 18 August, 2014. I’ll then (within about 10 days after receiving your selections) choose one of them, and assign it to you as the article for you to work on. Your job will be to analyse your assigned article from the S/L perspective, identifying the S/L dimensions, components, issues, and the like. Prepare and submit to me a word-processed report of 1500 words or less. The softcopy is due by 2:00 PM, Thursday, 11 September, 2014 (hand-in the hardcopy version in class on the same day). This report should also briefly highlight what you’ve learned from it, and what areas (of the article’s message) you would question or find of interest to pursue further, and why. Formatting, style, etc., should follow the Document Guidelines” uploaded at MyUni. (There won’t be a formal presentation required on your article work, but a brief and informal commentary may take place on some, or all of them in class at a later time.)

    Please do not postpone sending on your selections to me till the last moment. Keep in mind that the quality of your selections will be part of this assignment; hence, a last minute selection effort on your part may not be so helpful to you in this regard.

    Periodicals to use:
    · Asian Wall Street Journal
    · The Australian
    · Fortune
    · The New York Times
    · The Economist

    Be sure to select articles that have good relevant S/L substance and coverage. Here is a good example:

    < http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/08/technology/the-unlikely-ascent-of-jack-ma-alibabas-founder.html?_r=0>.

    Now a few more words on PARTICIPATION:
    The ability to communicate and present ideas clearly, logically and enthusiastically is said to be among the most desirable qualities that recruiters look for. This ability can be fostered by practice, which is the main reason why the task of presentations/discussions is being assigned to you during the term, along with participation expected of all in the course so that there’ll be ample opportunity for you to practice content-specific communication and exchange of ideas. However, this participation activity has to have some desirable characteristics. You might find the following observations useful in this regard, as phrased by Prof. R.B. Chase:
    -- Outstanding contributor: The person’s contributions reflect exceptional preparation, and the ideas offered are always substantive, clearly-stated, and provide major insights and direction for the class. If this person were not a member of the class, the quality of discussions would be diminished significantly.
    -- Satisfactory contributor: Generally well prepared, contributes positively to the discussion, attentive (or good at faking it).
    -- Unsatisfactory contributor: Contribution in class reflects inadequate preparation. Ideas are seldom substantive, and provide few, if any, insights and never a constructive direction for the class. Class comments are either obvious, or isolated from the main discussion, or confusing to the class.
    -- It is not necessary to contribute in every class, although you should be ready if called upon. In my past experience, several of the best contributors did not speak in every class, but their contributions were truly insightful and persuasive. In evaluating class participation, I try
    to reward contributions that, 1) get the discussion off to a productive start, 2) shape the discussion through the introduction or use of concepts or frameworks, 3) provide enlightening quantitative analysis, 4) help change direction when needed, and 5) reflect good listening on what others have said.

    Please note that the above observations paraphrased from Professor Chase will serve as the basis for the participation desiderata in this course. In keeping with Professor Chase’s last point above, please be aware that speaking up just to say something/anything in order to look like participating isn’t a good approach – in fact, it will likely work against you.

    One last point on participation: Inevitably, class participation is somewhat subjective in nature, as it is based, largely, on my judgment and observations. However, it should be clear that, for each absence, you’ll be giving up the opportunity to earn (1/12)th of the participation points.
    Submission
    Any group presenting a case/chapter MUST electronically submit to me their report and presentation slides (in absolute final form – hence, only once) latest by 4:00 PM on Wednesday, the day before the presentation day (Word.doc format is preferable for the report, but Word.docx can also be used). A hardcopy of these documents along with the signed/executed Cover Sheet will be required and collected, latest, right after the presentation/discussion of the same in class.

    Late submission of either the electronic and/or the hardcopy of any work will translate into a minimum of 5% mark reduction per day late. (Incidentally, I may seek some feedback from your classmates in assessing each group’s case presentation and leading the discussion on it upon the conclusion of the “in-class” part of this exercise.)

    Presentation of Assignments
    • Please attach an “Assignment Cover Sheet,” which is signed and dated by you before submission of any/all individual work.
    • All group assignments must be attached to a ‘Group Assignment Cover Sheet’, which must be signed and dated by all group members before submission. All team members are expected to contribute approximately equally to a group assignment, and are equally responsible for all aspects of the work.
    • Lecturers can refuse to accept assignments, which do not have a signed acknowledgement of the University’s policy on plagiarism.
    Please retain a copy of all assignments submitted (you must!).

    Assignment Guidelines including Referencing Details
    In preparing any written piece of assessment for your postgraduate studies it is important to draw on the relevant ‘literature’ to support critical analysis. Also essential is to reference the literature used. Correct referencing is important because it identifies the source of the ideas and arguments that you present, and sometimes the source of the actual words you use, and helps to avoid the problem of plagiarism.

    Late Assignment Submission
    Students are expected to submit their work by the due date to maintain a fair and equitable system. Extensions will generally only be given for medical or other serious reasons. All requests for extensions must be emailed to the lecturer in charge of the course no less than 36 hours before the due date. Each request will be assessed on its merits. A late assignment (without prior arrangement) will be penalised by a 5% mark reduction for each day that it is late.

    Return of Assignments
    I aim to mark and return assignments to students within two (2) weeks of the due date with written feedback. Be sure to collect your assignment from me once they are marked and available. If on the day I return them, you were unable to collect your assignment, please see me at your earliest convenience to claim your marked assignment. Please don’t delay collecting your assignment any further than 2 weeks.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.