DENT 1005BHO - Dental Science and Practice I Part 2

Teaching Hospitals - Semester 2 - 2017

From a patient care focus, this stream introduces students to the oral cavity and practice of dentistry and provides a foundation for understanding the normal structure and function of the oral cavity, patient management and dentistry as a career. By using problem-based learning packages that present a range of practice situations, students begin to develop patient investigation skills and an integrated knowledge base. The stream emphasises the scientific basis of dentistry; introduces new developments and outlines important ethical issues in the health professions; develops individual and group learning skills, describes the normal appearance of oral soft tissues, the morphology and development of the teeth and main features of the masticatory system as a basis for the analysis of patients' oral health and disease; discusses the nature, aetiology and prevention of common dental diseases at both individual and community level; introduces students to behavioural sciences and psychology applied to dentistry; provides exposure to the influences on dental practice and begins an examination of contexts in which dentists work. Topics include: oral surface features; morphology of the teeth; tooth emergence and calcification; introduction to dental occlusion, radiographic anatomy; nature and distribution of dental diseases; preventive dentistry; fear and anxiety in dentistry; management and motivation of dental patients; dentist-patient communication; behavioural consequences of oral diseases; community dental health issues; dental education and the shaping of the professional; the professional environment; the dentist's role; career pathways; adaptation to change and the possible future for dentistry.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code DENT 1005BHO
    Course Dental Science and Practice I Part 2
    Coordinating Unit Dental
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Teaching Hospitals
    Units 24
    Contact Up to 25 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Restrictions Available to BDS students only
    Course Description From a patient care focus, this stream introduces students to the oral cavity and practice of dentistry and provides a foundation for understanding the normal structure and function of the oral cavity, patient management and dentistry as a career. By using problem-based learning packages that present a range of practice situations, students begin to develop patient investigation skills and an integrated knowledge base. The stream emphasises the scientific basis of dentistry; introduces new developments and outlines important ethical issues in the health professions; develops individual and group learning skills, describes the normal appearance of oral soft tissues, the morphology and development of the teeth and main features of the masticatory system as a basis for the analysis of patients' oral health and disease; discusses the nature, aetiology and prevention of common dental diseases at both individual and community level; introduces students to behavioural sciences and psychology applied to dentistry; provides exposure to the influences on dental practice and begins an examination of contexts in which dentists work.
    Topics include: oral surface features; morphology of the teeth; tooth emergence and calcification; introduction to dental occlusion, radiographic anatomy; nature and distribution of dental diseases; preventive dentistry; fear and anxiety in dentistry; management and motivation of dental patients; dentist-patient communication; behavioural consequences of oral diseases; community dental health issues; dental education and the shaping of the professional; the professional environment; the dentist's role; career pathways; adaptation to change and the possible future for dentistry.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Vicki Skinner

    Course Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Farmer
    Phone: +61 8 8313 3272
    Email: elizabeth.farmer@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: 5 101 ADH

    Course Coordinator: Dr Loreta Rupinskas
    Phone: +61 8 8313 3059Email: loreta.rupinskas@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Room 4.15 Oliphant Building

    Course Coordinator: Dr Vicki Skinner
    Phone: +61 8 8313 4229
    Email: vicki.skinner@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: ADH 6103c


    School Office
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5256
    Email: dentistry.reception@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Level 5 Oliphant Building, North Terrace Campus
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 comply with Uni and SADS policies by displaying appropriate professional and ethical behaviour through respecting colleagues and patients, maintaining patient confidentiality and obtaining informed consent in all learning environments
    2 comply with AHPRA requirements for student registration and professional conduct in all learning environments.
    3 apply an evidence-based approach to inform decisions at all levels of interaction with healthy adult patients by applying the hierarchy of evidence and basic statistical concepts when critically evaluating relevant literature.
    4 describe the complimentary functions and roles of all involved in patient care (eg dental assistant, dental therapist and dental hygienist).
    5 critically evaluate their own performance, seeking feedback and implementing appropriate strategies for improvement.
    6 describe different approaches to respond to common occupational stressors and seeks assistance in developing effective management strategies for self and patients.
    7 use effective patient-centred communication to competently manage the oral care of healthy adult patients through appropriate use of questions, active listening, explanations, empathy, and feedback.
    8 work and communicate effectively and respectfully with other members of the oral health care team in simulated and clinical setting, and adopt a leadership role when necessary.
    9 discuss the factors, eg, behavioural and social, that contribute to the maintenance of balance of the oral ecosystem, including the normal oral microflora and its relation to the host under normal healthy conditions and applies this to the management of healthy adult patients.
    10 describe the complimentary functions and roles of all involved in patient care (eg dental assistant, dental therapist and dental hygienist).
    11 apply integrated knowledge of the structure and function of selected body systems and key functions of a healthy body such as nutrient supply and waste removal, respiration, transport and movement, as a basis for analysis of patients' oral health.
    12 safely and accurately take a medical, dental and social history, examine extraoral, intraoral soft, periodontal and hard tissues, perform a simple occlusal analysis including the collection and interpretation of additional clinical information, appropriately recognise the range of normality and record normal findings and clinical signs of common oral diseases for selected healthy adult patients.
    13 explain the principles of identification of risk factors in relation to the development of common oral diseases in selected healthy adult patients
    14 apply understanding of the oral ecosystem, patient education, behaviour change and remineralisation materials to develop preventive recommendations to restore and maintain oral health for selected healthy adult patients.
    15 discuss and implement appropriate infection control and occupational health and safety procedures required when working within a clinical environment.
    16 safely and effectively manipulate dental instruments (dental mirror, explorer, periodontal probe, and the slow speed handpiece) whilst working on a patient colleague.
    17 apply knowledge of risks associated with dental radiographs to safely and accurately take bitewing radiographs in simulated settings; examine and critique bitewing radiographs and recognise the appearance of normal imaged structures and associated basic pathology (eg restorations, caries, calculus) in bitewing, periapical and panoramic radiographs.
    18 safely and effectively explain and perform simple preventive treatments, including remineralisation techniques eg professional or home fluorides, fissure sealants (under rubber dam - lab only), oral hygiene instructions, dietary advice in simulated and/or clinical situations.
    19 safely and effectively explain and perform simple preventive treatments, including remineralisation techniques eg professional or home fluorides, fissure sealants (under rubber dam - lab only), oral hygiene instructions, dietary advice in simulated and/or clinical situations.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    3, 4, 6, 9,10,11,12,13,14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    3, 6, 9, 14
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4, 7, 8
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 15
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1, 2, 7, 15
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    5, 7, 8
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Harris NO, Garcia-Godoy F, Nielsen C (2009) Primary preventive dentistry. 7th ed. Pearson: Upper Saddle River, N.J.Junqueira LC, Mescher AL (2012)

    Junqueira’s Basic Histology.13th edition, McGraw Hill/Lange: New York.

    Sherwood L (2013) Human Physiology - From Cells to Systems. 8th edition. Brooks/Cole: Belmont CA.

    Townsend GC, Winning T (2014) Dental Science & Practice I & II Resources. School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide: Adelaide (purchased from Image and Copy Centre).

    Whaites E (2007) Essentials of dental radiography and radiology. 4thed. Churchill Livingstone: New York.
    OR
    Iannucci JM, Howerton LJ (2012) Dental Radiography Principles and Techniques. 4th ed. Elsevier/Saunders: St Louis (alternative to Whaites 2007).

    Wolf HF, Hassell TM (2006) Color Atlas of Dental Hygiene. – Periodontology. Thieme Stuttgart: New York.

    Ensure you obtain the latest editions of texts.

    Other resources will be made available during the year via MyUni: Dental Science and Practice I, Part 1 & 2.
    Recommended Resources
    Highly recommended textbooks:

    Campbell NA et al., (2013) Biology, 13th ed. Pearson Education Inc: San Francisco.
    Edited by Ole Fejerskov and Edwina Kidd (2012) Dental Caries The Disease and its Clinical Management, 2nd edition. Blackwell Munksgaard.
    Kevin HK Yip, Roger J Smales (2012) Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning in Contemporary Clinical Practice. 1st edition. Stephen Hancocks Ltd.
    Kevin HK Yip, Roger J Smales, John A Kaidonis (2006) Tooth Erosion Prevention and Treatment, 1st edition. Jaypee Brothers, New Delhi.
    Kidd EAM (2005) Essentials of dental caries. 3rd ed. Oxford University Press: Oxford.
    Mount GJ and Hume W (2005) Preservation and restoration of tooth structure. 2nd ed. Knowledge books & software: Brighton, Queensland. NB 3rd edition will be available mid – late 2014.
    Nield-Gehrig JS (2013) Fundamentals of periodontal instrumentation & advanced root instrumentation. 7th ed Lippincott Williams & Wilkins: Philadelphia.
    Tortora G.J, Derrickson B (2013) Principles Of Anatomy And Physiology. 13th ed. Harper Collins: New York. (Students who have not studied biology will find this text useful).
    Ross MH, Kaye GI, Pawlina W. (2011) Histology, A Text and Atlas. 6th ed. Wolters Kluwer/ Lippincott-Williams and Wilkins: Philadelphia.


    Reference Books:

    Berkovitz BKB, Holland GR, Moxham BJ (2009) A color atlas and textbook of oral anatomy, histology and embryology. 4th ed. Mosby: New York.
    Burkitt HG et al (2006) Wheater’s Functional Histology - A Text And Colour Atlas. 5th ed.  Churchill Livingstone: Edinburgh.
    Chang R (2007) Chemistry. 9th ed. McGraw-Hill: New York
    Cormack DH (2001)  Essential histology  2nd ed.  J.B. Lippincott Co: Philadelphia.
    Curtis H, Barnes NS (1995) Biology. 5th ed.  Worth Publishers: New York.
    Fawcett DW (1997) Bloom and Fawcett: Concise Histology. Chapman and Hall: New York.
    Ferguson DB (1988) Physiology for Dental Students.   Wright: London
    Ferguson DB (1999) Oral Bioscience.  Churchill Livingstone: London.
    Ferracane JL (1995) Materials in Dentistry: principles and applications. JB Lippincott: Philadelphia
    Gould SJ (1984) The mismeasure of man.  Penguin, Hammondsworth: Middlesex.
    Harrison GA et al. (1988) Human Biology: an introduction to human evolution, variation, growth and adaptability 3rd ed.  Oxford University Press: Oxford.
    Humphris G, Ling MS (2000) Behavioural Sciences for Dentistry. Churchill: Edinburgh  (out of print: available in Barr Smith Library (BSL)
    Jordan RE, Abrams L (1992) Kraus' oral anatomy and occlusion. Mosby Year Book Inc: St Louis  (out of print: available in BSL
    Kent GG, Croucher R (1998) Achieving oral health: the social context of dental care. 3rd ed. Wright: Oxford
    Ladiges P, Knox B (2006)  Biology: an Australian Focus. 3rd ed.  McGraw Hill Australia: Sydney
    Locker D (1989) An introduction to behavioural science and dentistry. Routledge; London (out of print: available in BSL
    Mitchell DA, Mitchell L (2005)  Oxford handbook of clinical dentistry. 4th ed.:Oxford University Press: Oxford
    Molnar S (1983) Human variation: races, types and ethnic groups.  Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs New Jersey.
    Mostofsky DI, Forgione AG, Giddon DB (2006) Behavioural Dentistry. Blackwell Munskgaard: Ames, iowa.
    Nanci A (2012) Ten Cate’s Oral Histology: development, structure and function,8th Mosby: St Louis
    Scheid RC (2005) Woelfel’s dental anatomy : its relevance to dentistry. 7th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins: Philadelphia.
    Scott EM, Waterhouse JM (1986)  Physiology and the scientific method.  Manchester University Press: Manchester
    Thexton AJ  (1992)  Mastication and swallowing: an overview.  British Dental Journal 173:197-206.
    Timberlake KC (2007) General Organic and Biological Chemistry: structures of life. 2nd ed. Pearson Education: San Francisco
    Wilson TG, Kornman KS (2003) Fundamentals of Periodontics 2nd ed. Quintessence Publishing Co: Chicago
    Online Learning
    Communications about the course will be via the Announcements section on MyUni and/or by email. Additional course-related material, such as a detailed class meeting and tutorial schedule, assessment schedules will be available through MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    A variety of learning modes will be used in this course including:
    •    Dentally-related situations/experiences focussing particularly on the stated stream objectives (Integrated Learning Activities - ILAs)
    •    Class Meetings
    •    Clinic sessions
    •    Learning Laboratories
    •    Tutorials
    •    Resource Sessions
    •    Assignments
    •    Library research/ literature searches
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    To enable successful completion of the course, students need to allocate an appropriate time commitment to their study. In addition to the formal contact time [eg, class meetings, tutorials, practicals, ILA] students need to allocate non-contact time to their studies. Non-contact time is required for a range of activities which may include, but are not limited to, assessment tasks, reading, researching, note-taking, revision, writing, informal discussions with other students, ILA group discussions and consultation with staff.

    While the relative proportion of contact and non-contact time may vary between courses. As a guide to achieve a satisfactory level of performance, however, a full-time student would expect to spend, on average, a total of 48 hrs/wk on their studies during learning periods. This includes contact and non-contact hours (see below).

    The learning periods for BDS I are:
    •    19 weeks for Semester 1 (ie O'Week to the end of the examination period); and
    •    17 weeks for semester 2 (ie week 1 to the end of the examination period).

    The workload for undergraduate/postgraduate programs is 24 units per year (full-time). Total workload (h/week): 48

    Contact hours (h/week): up to 26: Comprised of ILA, Class Meetings, Learning Laboratories, Resource Sessions, Clinic sessions and Tutorials.

    Non Contact hours (h/week): approx 22: Comprised of Group Meetings; Group and Individual Learning, and Preparation for ILAs, class meetings, laboratory, resource sessions, clinic, tutorial activities, assignments and assessment.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Week Topic Lecture
    1 ILA 1.5 Alicia Jackson •    Oral ecosystem: balance, biofilms & tooth deposits
    •    Occlusion & functions of the masticatory system
    •    Cartilage and bone structure & function
    •    Osteology of the skull & muscles for mastication
    2 ILA 1.5 Alicia Jackson •    Histology of teeth: Enamel, dentine, pulp
    •    A population health perspective
    •    Chemistry of remin/demin
    •    Composition and biochemistry of hard tissues
    3 ILA 1.6 Alicia Jackson follow-up appointment •    Oral ecosystem (demin/remin)
    •    Introduction to ethics in dentistry
    •    Systemic & masticatory function: Reflexes
    •    Periodontium & hard tissue: Resorption
    •    Control of movement & the chewing cycle
    4 ILA 1.6 Alicia Jackson follow-up appointment •    Fluorides:Mechanisms of action
    •    Blood Clotting and The bleeding client
    •    Moisture control
    •    Patient-centred care: Explaining and providing information
    5 ILA 1.7 Mr Crudus •    Renal system: structure and function
    •    Preventive strategies
    •    Fluid balance: The regulation of salt & water
    •    Principles approach to ethics
    6 ILA 1.7 Mr Crudus •    Ionic issues in the body – case study
    •    Fissure sealants: Prevention of imbalance
    •    The balance of immunity & defence: Inflammation & innate immunity
    •    Homeostasis of acid-base balance in the body
    7 ILA 1.8 Peter Pascoe •    What is respiration? Structure and function of respiratory system
    •    The client with shortness of breath
    •    The balance of immunity & defence: acquired immunity
    •    Prevention: Restoring the remin/demin balance
    8 ILA 1.8 Peter Pascoe •    Population  fluoride & Fluorosis 
    •    Tipping the balance towards remineralisation
    •    Periodontal defences in healthy gingival
    •    Diet and dental health
    9 ILA 1.8 Peter Pascoe •    Microbiology/gingival crevicular fluid in healthy gingival tissues
    •    The GIT: tissues working together; beyond the oral cavity
    •    Population health: Diet
    10 ILA 1.9 Sally Accuro •    Ethical reasoning cases
    •    Structure & function of carbohydrates & Carbohydrate Metabolism
    •    Preventive cases
    11 ILA 1.9 Sally Accuro •    Ethical reasoning cases
    •    GIT: pancreas, gall bladder and liver
    •    Lipid, amino acid, and nucleotide metabolism
    •    Control of metabolism
    12 ILA 1.9 Sally Accuro •    Biochemistry of digestion & absorption
    •    Food to energy
    •    Patterns of preventative care in Australian dental care
    Specific Course Requirements
    Annual CPR Update  (SA Health directive)
    SA Health has advised the School of Dentistry that all BDS students must hold a current CPR certificate. This needs to be renewed each calendar year by the completion of an accredited, nationally recognised First aid or CPR course. A CPR or CPR refresher course is run by the Adelaide Health Simulation and Skills Centre (AHSSC) that is located in the Medical School.There is a cost of $25.00 for each student.

    Equipement Provided
    Enlarged/Oversized plaster models: provided (loan) in Tuesday am Learning Laboratory, semester 1.These must be returned to the simulation clinic at the BEGINNING OF SEMESTER 2.

    Equipment Required
    Extracted natural teeth:
    You will need to contact your local dentist and/or mentor and ask them to collect extracted teeth for use in the program. Information about the procedure that should be followed for collection of extracted natural teeth will be provided in O’Week and on the Dental Science and Practice I MyUni site.

    Laboratory coat:
    You are required to purchase a laboratory coat that should be worn in all learning laboratories in Dental Science and Practice I. You are required to wear this during your Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday/Friday morning laboratory and resource sessions, to conform with OH&S regulations.

    Clinic Coat:
    All students will be required to purchase a blue clinic coat to wear in the clinic during all clinic procedures.

    Protective glasses:
    You are required to wear protective glasses during your learning laboratories and in the clinic sessions, that conform to Australian OH&S regulations. The eyewear should be close fitting and not have gaps at the side of the eyes or above the brow. Students who wear prescription glasses need to purchase an overshield or consider if applicable wearing contact lenses with protective glasses. More information will be provided during O week.

    Instrument Kit:
    All students are required to purchase a kit of dental instruments for DSP1. These instruments will be required for exercises carried out on Columbia Models and Natural Tooth Manikins and will also be required for use in 2nd, 3rd and 4th year of operative technique exercises. Further information will be provided during O Week.

    Plastic tooth Models:
    The purchase of plastic models of teeth, gums and bases is required for use in Dental Science & Practice I. The same set of teeth will also be used in later years of the program. In previous years second hand models were available for purchase from senior students, but due to major changes to the teaching laboratories, the previously used models will no longer be suitable. You will be informed during O week of the cost of the articulated plastic tooth models and when the models will be available for purchase.

    The combined cost for the instrument kit and plastic tooth models in 2014 was approximately $1400.

    Dental Loupes:
    The purchase of dental loupes is highly recommended from BDS2 onwards.  The cost is approximately $1000 upwards.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Student learning from the SGDE activities involve the  following processes as part of participating in ILAs:

    •    learning the systematic scientific approach to patient investigation, ie, consistent with students current and future professional practice;
    •    identifying, critiquing and referencing relevant evidence derived from the literature and interactions with School researchers;
    •    researching answers to questions they identify using this evidence related to clinical, population health, behavioural and biodental sciences.  

    As a result of their research, students develop, structure and apply their knowledge so they can understand their patient’s situation and recommend appropriate care.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Clinic/ Sim clinic Summative 20% All
    Class Meeting/ILA/Resource Session /Tutorial participation Summative NGP Satisfactory Required All
    Radiography Test of Understanding Summative NGP
    Satisfactory Required
    All
    2x 2-Hour Written Examinations Summative 80% All
    1 X 2 Hour Progressive Integrated Assessment Summative NGP
    Satisfactory Required
    All
    Assessment Detail
    Feedback (Formative Assessment)
    A range of formative assessment activities will be provided in several sessions in each semester. These have been designed to help students learn key concepts in DSP I as well as give feedback on student progress and to gain experience in the question formats used in DSP I. These activities will be in the form of questions in class meetings, learning laboratories, tutorials and on-line. The formative PIA at the end of Semester 1 will also provide students with feedback on their progress at the end of Semester 1.

    To achieve a satisfactory grade in DSPI: students must demonstrate professional behaviour throughout the year. This includes punctual attendance and participation in ALL SCHEDULED CLASSES and in ALL INTERACTIONS with student colleagues and academic and support staff within the University. Professional behaviour is reviewed as part of the Board of Examiner’s proceedings.

    Written assessment (including exams) fall under the University's rules and regulations re cheating, plagiarism etc.

    To pass DSPI and the First Annual Examination students must obtain:
    •    a satisfactory result in each of the components of the summative assessment in semesters 1 and 2; and
    •    a satisfactory performance in the written examinations overall and a satisfactory performance in the PIA.

    If a borderline grade is achieved in the clinic/lab, a student may be given an additional opportunity to demonstrate a satisfactory performance. If an overall borderline grade is achieved in the examinations or the PIA, a student may be offered an opportunity to sit a Replacement/Additional Assessment examination.

    The overall grade for the year will be determined by performance in the written examinations and moderated by performance in the clinics and clinical laboratories. The final grade is comprised of examinations (80%) and clinic/laboratory (20%). A satisfactory grade will only be awarded to students who achieve a satisfactory standard in all components.
    Submission
    Details on submission processes/requirements will be provided in the documentation for any work that is to be submitted. These will be posted on MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    GS8 (Coursework Grade Scheme)
    Grade Description
    CN Continuing
    FNS Fail No Submission
    NFE No Formal Examination
    F Fail
    NGP Non Graded Pass
    P Pass
    C Credit
    D Distinction
    HD High Distinction
    RP Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as Course Experience Questionnaire (completed after graduation) and Program reviews.
    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy, course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted every year. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data can be found at: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/sp/selt/aggregates
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.