LAW 3527 - Public Law Internship Programme

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

The course places students in "internships" with the office of the SA Ombudsman for a period of 22 days in total. This involves two intensive weeks over non-teaching weeks eg summer or winter break, followed by one day per week over the semester (with each day being a 71/2 hour day). The internships enable students to build on their understanding of the theory of public law by gaining an appreciation of its practical operation. The course aims to give depth and context to students existing knowledge of public law. The course will begin with an orientation seminar providing an overview of the Ombudsman office to students. Students will be required to complete an agreed research task under the supervision of the course coordinator. The research task might involve research into a specific aspect of the powers of the Ombudsman. The research task will be negotiated with the student and the course coordinator, and will build on the work the student completes within the Ombudsman's Office. It is expected that students will also be involved in day-to-day activities of the Ombudsman's Office and gain a broad understanding of how such accountability organisations operate and of the operation of public law generally.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code LAW 3527
    Course Public Law Internship Programme
    Coordinating Unit Adelaide Law School
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate Law (LLB)
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Prerequisites LAW 2504
    Restrictions Available to LLB students only. Enrolment is by selection only, please consult with Course Coordinator for eligibility.
    Course Description The course places students in "internships" with the office of the SA Ombudsman for a period of 22 days in total. This involves two intensive weeks over non-teaching weeks eg summer or winter break, followed by one day per week over the semester (with each day being a 71/2 hour day). The internships enable students to build on their understanding of the theory of public law by gaining an appreciation of its practical operation. The course aims to give depth and context to students existing knowledge of public law.
    The course will begin with an orientation seminar providing an overview of the Ombudsman office to students. Students will be required to complete an agreed research task under the supervision of the course coordinator. The research task might involve research into a specific aspect of the powers of the Ombudsman. The research task will be negotiated with the student and the course coordinator, and will build on the work the student completes within the Ombudsman's Office. It is expected that students will also be involved in day-to-day activities of the Ombudsman's Office and gain a broad understanding of how such accountability organisations operate and of the operation of public law generally.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Laura Grenfell

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    No information currently available.

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The internships enable students to build on their understanding of the theory of public law by gaining an appreciation of its practical operation. The course aims to give depth and context to students’ existing knowledge of public law. It is expected that students will be involved in day-to-day activities of their internship office and gain a broad understanding of how such accountability organisations operate and of the operation of public law generally.
    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

    Specific Course Requirements
    The course places students in "internships" for a total period of 25 days (summer) or 22 days (semester 1 and 2 - this involves two intensive weeks over non-teaching weeks eg summer or winter break, followed by one day per week over the semester, with each day being a 71/2 hour day).
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Item % of final mark Due date Length Redeemable Learning Outcomes
    Portfolio – Part 1 – Agreed research task/essay 70% The due date will be upon completion of the internship negotiated between the student and the course co-ordinator. However, all work must be in, at least, 2 weeks after the end of the teaching semester. 3500 words No 1 - 7
    Portfolio – Part 2 – 3 x Diary summaries 30% The first of these summaries must be submitted in the first 4 weeks of the internship. 500 words each No 1 - 7
    Assessment Detail
    The Portfolio
    The portfolio has three components:

    (1) an agreed research task/essay (approximately 3500 words) (worth 70%);

    (2) 3 x 500 word diary summaries to be emailed during the course of the internship that identify and analyse (i) how the internship is helping to develop their legal skills; (ii) the applicable law; and, (iii) the effectiveness of the legal processes they are observing/interacting with. (worth 30%).
    The first of these summaries must be submitted after the first two intensive weeks of the internship so that feedback can be provided to assist in the preparation of subsequent summaries and preparation of the research essay.

    Upon completion of your internship, you will be required to hand up Parts 1 and 3 of the portfolio on a negotiated date.

    1. The Agreed Research Task
    The subject of your research task will be negotiated with the subject co-ordinator. Ideally the focus of this research task/essay should be a practical one relating to your internship.

    For example, if you are asked to research and write a paper for the organisation, you may use this as the base of your task/essay as long as you have the organisation’s permission to do so. This permission is important, especially where the material you are looking at is of a confidential nature.

    Or you can use your experience as the basis of your paper – eg. What are the limits of the Ombudsman’s powers? Why?

    Your research task/essay must have a legal focus and include legal analysis.

    The due date for the portfolio will be negotiated between the student and the course co-ordinator. In general the rule is that all work must be submitted at least before the commencement of the next semester.

    Students may re-submit only the essay for academic cause (more than 45%). Other parts of the portfolio cannot be resubmitted.

    Students are reminded that a conceded pass (45-49%) in this course does not count as a pass in the course for the purposes of the LLB (see the relevant academic program rules). If a student receives a conceded pass in this course, they may do further work on their essay and resubmit it. In this case, their essay will be remarked, and if the new mark on the essay raises their overall mark to a passing grade, the student will be awarded 50% for the course.

    Grade Descriptors for the Essay:

    Fail 0-49
    • Does not develop coherent and rational arguments
    • Demonstrates fundamental errors of understanding of key legal principles and concepts
    • Minimal evidence of research to support argument
    • Absence of legal analysis and reflection on practical experience
    • Demonstrates limited analytical and evaluative skills
    Pass 50-64%
    • Adequate articulation of argument
    • Demonstrates a basic understanding and application of analytic concepts and theoretical        concepts
    • Minimal adherence to citation style
    • Adequate relevant research informing the argument
    • Basic understanding of that reading
    • Minimal reflection on practical experience
    • Insufficient legal analysis and reflection
    • Adequate skills in written expression and presentation
    Credit 65-74
    • Demonstrates a high level of understanding of the relevant legal materials
    • Shows a thorough understanding of relevant legal materials
    • Demonstrates some critical legal thinking and evaluative skills
    • Adequate legal analysis
    • Adequate reflection on practical experience
    • Adequate skills in written expression and presentation
    Distinction 75-84
    • High standard of understanding of the relevant legal materials with some original                    and sophisticated perspectives
    • High level of insight and legal analysis
    • High level of reflection on practical experience
    • Broad ranging legal research skills
    • Evidence of high level of critical legal thinking
    • Well developed analytical and evaluative skills
    • Developed skills in written expression and presentation

    High Distinction 85-100
    • Outstanding level of understanding and interpretation
    • Outstanding level of reflection on practical experience
    • Compelling, well-supported and tightly structured legal arguments
    • Broad ranging research and original and sophisticated thinking
    • Highly developed written communication skills
    Submission
    PRESENTATION OF ASSIGNMENTS

    Students must retain a copy of all assignments submitted.
    1. All parts of the assessment must be emailed to the course coordinator
    2. There will be a penalty of 5% per day or part thereof for any late submission without a formal extension of the time granted.
    3. The Portfolio must:
      • Be footnoted (substantive footnotes will be included in the word count)
      • Be double-spaced and paginated
      • Have a bibliography appropriate for the topic
      • Adhere to the word limit.
    ASSIGNMENT GUIDELINES FOR REFERENCING

    Students must use the Australian Guide to Legal Citation.

    RETURN OF ASSIGNMENTS AND FEEDBACK

    Assignments will be returned to students within 2-3 weeks of the due date with written feedback.
    Students must not submit work for an assignment that has previously been submitted for any other course.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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