TRADE 7004 - Principles of International Trade and Development

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2015

This course is concerned with the relationship between trade and development, and more specifically with development-related issues in the WTO and regional trade arrangements. The course will provide an overview of how trade can contribute to achieving economic growth and more sustainable and equitable development when framed by the appropriate domestic and international policies and measures. It will analyse how the GATT/WTO system has evolved to take into account the interests and concerns of developing countries. Development-related issues currently being treated in the WTO will be presented and discussed, with particular attention paid to the work program on special and differential treatment; the different developmental aspects of the DDA negotiations, including agriculture, NAMA and services; and the Trade Facilitation initiative. It concludes with an analysis of appropriate trade related development strategies to enhance more sustainable and equitable economic development.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code TRADE 7004
    Course Principles of International Trade and Development
    Coordinating Unit Institute for International Trade
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact 3 x 1.5 day intensive modules
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Quota A quota of 35 applies
    Course Description This course is concerned with the relationship between trade and development, and more specifically with development-related issues in the WTO and regional trade arrangements. The course will provide an overview of how trade can contribute to achieving economic growth and more sustainable and equitable development when framed by the appropriate domestic and international policies and measures. It will analyse how the GATT/WTO system has evolved to take into account the interests and concerns of developing countries. Development-related issues currently being treated in the WTO will be presented and discussed, with particular attention paid to the work program on special and differential treatment; the different developmental aspects of the DDA negotiations, including agriculture, NAMA and services; and the Trade Facilitation initiative. It concludes with an analysis of appropriate trade related development strategies to enhance more sustainable and equitable economic development.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mr Jim Redden

    Location: Level 6, 10 Pulteney Street
    Telephone: +61 8 8313 6900
    Fax: +61 8 8313 6948
    Email: james.redden@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    1 Identify and analyse some of the major underlying causes of poverty in developing countries, the challenges they face and potential solutions that can assist in achieving sustainable economic development
    2 Identify and analyse differing perspectives on the necessary conditions for trade measures to effectively contribute towards poverty reduction and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals
    3 Understand the evolution of developing country issues in the GATT/ WTO and the current development aspects of the Doha round of trade negotiations.
    4 Identify and evaluate the different types of special and differential treatment (S&DT) provisions in trade agreements and the differing perspectives on the use of S&DT
    5 Evaluate the comparative value of multilateral as distinct from regional or bilateral preferential trade agreements in assisting developing countries build wealth and achieve poverty reduction.
    6 Develop a holistic understanding of the complex relation between trade and development so as to identify trade related development strategies which are context specific and can assist developing countries achieve poverty alleviation through sustainable and equitable economic growth.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1,2,3,4,5
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1,2,3,4,5
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 5,6
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 1,2,3,4,5,6
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1,2,3,4,5
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 1,2,3,4,5,6
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1,2,3,4,5,6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    Students are expected to have a basic level of knowledge about the multilateral trading system and international trade legal principles.  The readings are designed to assist the student in becoming familiar with these topics and to spark intellectual curiosity to continue their learning process beyond the classroom.  Students are encouraged to read selectively from a range of recommended texts and references listed below, and also to undertake on-line research on the activities of relevant international organizations as well as in electronic journals.

    The following books are required for the course. 

    • Hoekman, B and Kostecki, M., The Political Economy of the World Trading System: The WTO and Beyond, Oxford University Press, Second Edition, 2001
    • Stoler A, Redden J and Jackson L, Trade and Poverty Reduction in the Asia Pacific Region,Cambridge University Press, WTO, 2009
    • Gallagher P, Lowe P and Stoler A., Managing the Challenges of WTO Participation, Cambridge University Press, WTO, 2005
    • An online Course Reader of Required Reading 
    Recommended Resources
    Primary Sources
    • Anderson, K. & Winters L.A., 2008, The Challenges of Reducing International Trade and Migration Barriers, Policy Research Working Paper 4598, World Bank Development Research Team
    • Anderson, K., Cockburn J., Martin W., 2010, Agricultural Price Distortions, Inequality and Poverty, World Bank, Washington D.C.
    • Cameron, H & Njinkeu, D (ed.) 2009, Aid for Trade and Development, Cambridge University Press.
    • CUTS (1999) 'Conditions Necessary for the Liberalization of Trade and Investment to Reduce Poverty', Final report to DfiD. Cited in Winters (2000, 2002)
    • Collier, Paul 2006, ‘Why the WTO is Deadlocked: And What Can be Done About It’, The World Economy.
    • David, DB, Nordstrom, H & Winters, LA 1999, Trade, Income Disparity & Poverty, WTO Special Studies, Geneva.
    • Hoekman, B, Mattoo, A, & English, P (ed.) 2002, Development, Trade, and the WTO, The World Bank, Washington D.C.
    • Malhotra, Kamal 2004, Trade, Growth, Poverty Reduction and Human Development: Some Linkages and Policy Implications, Geneva, prepared for the XVIII G-24 Technical Group Meeting, Palais de Nations, Geneva.
    • Pariss, Brett 1999, Trade for Development, World Vision Discussion Paper, Melbourne, Victoria.
    • Rodriguez, Francisco & Rodrik, Dani 2000, Trade Policy and Economic Growth: A Skeptic’s Guide to the Cross-National Evidence, University of Maryland and Harvard University.
    • Rodrik, Dani 2001, The Global Governance of Trade As If Development Really Mattered, United Nations Development Programme Background Paper, New York.
    • Michalopoulus, Constantine 2001, Developing Countries in the WTO, Palgrave, New York, USA.
    • Winters, A. (2002) 'Trade Liberalization and Poverty: What Are the Links?', The World Economy 25: 1339-1367.
    • Winters, A., McCulloch, N. and McKay, A. (2004) 'Trade Liberalization and Poverty: The Evidence So Far', Journal of Economic Literature XLII: 72-115
    • The World Bank, 2005, Pro-Poor Growth in the 1990s: Lessons and Insights from 14 Countries, IBRD/ The World Bank, Washington D.C.
    • WTO, 2015, Understanding the WTO: Basics and Agreements: http://www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/whatis_e/tif_e/tif_e.htm
    • WTO, 2014, World Trade Report 2014
    • WTO, 2012, Participation of Developing Economies in the Global Trading System, WTO Committee on Trade and Development, Geneva, WT/COMTD/79, November 2012
    Secondary Sources
    • Aksoy, M.A (2005) ‘Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries’,The World Bank, Washington, D.C.
    • Anderson, K (2002) Economy-wide Dimensions of Trade Policy Reform Ch.2 in Development, Trade and the WTO: A Handbook/B.Hoekman P.English and A Mattoo.
    • Baldwin, R. E. (2003) 'Openness and Growth: What's the Empirical Relationship?', NBER Working Paper 9578, National Bureau of Economic Research.
    • Bhagwati, J. and Srinivasan, T. N. (2002) 'Trade and Poverty in Developing Countries', American Economic Review 92(2): 180-183.
    • Brown, O (2005) Aiding or Abetting; Dilemmas of Foreign Aid and Political Instability in the Melanesian Pacific, International Institute for Sustainable Development, Winnipeg.
    • Collier, Paul 2006, Africa Geography and Growth, Oxford University.
    • Diamond, J., 'Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies', Norton Press, 1997
    • OECD (2008), ‘The DAC Guiding Principles for Aid Effectiveness, Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment’, www.oecd.org/dataoecd/14/27/42310124.pdf. Accessed February 26, 2010.
    • OECD (2001), The DAC Guidelines; Strengthening Trade Capacity for Development, OECD, Paris.
    • Oxfam ( 2002), Rigged Rules and Double Standards, Oxfam Great Britain
    • Parris, B (2003) Risky Development; Export Concentration, Foreign Investment and Policy Conditionality, WVA, Victoria.
    • Ravallion, M (2004) ‘Pro-Poor Growth: A Primer’, World Bank Development Research Group, World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No.3242
    • Rodrik, D (2004) ‘Growth Strategies’, John F.Kennedy School of Government, Massachusetts.
    • Thirwell, A.P., (2006) 'Growth and Development: With Special Reference to Developing Economies,' 8th Edition, Palgrave MacMillan
    • UNDP (2002) Human Development Report 2002, Deepening Democracy in a Fragmented World, Oxford: UNDP, New York.
    • Whaites, A (ed.2002) Masters of Their Own Development, World Vision International. California
    Online Learning

    Other online references will be given during the course.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course will provide an interactive environment of presentations, discussion and debate. Throughout the course there will be lectures, workshops, internet/DVD presentations, use of discussion board and class presentations as facilitated by the course coordinator as well as invited guest speakers followed by questions and discussions.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The Institute requires students undertaking this course to attend all three modules. This course comprise of approximately 36 contact hours (structured learning). In addition to time spent in class, students in TRADE 7004 are expected to devote an additional 120 non-contact hours to study and research work in this course.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Module Topic Lecturer(s)
    1A

    • Course overview and assessment
    • Globalisation, poverty and development
    Jim Redden
    1B

    • Perspectives on the trade - development relationship
    • Case-studies in trade and development
    Jim Redden
    2A

    • Revision and assignments
    • Treatment of development in the WTO
    Jim Redden
    2B

    • Trade interest of developing countries by sector – from agriculture to services
    • Case-study: applying trade solutions to one country
    Kym Anderson/Jim
    3A

    • The evolution and role of special and differential treatment for developing countries
    Jim Redden
    3B

    • Multilateralism & preferential trade agreements
    • Student presentations
    • Summary of trade and development relationship and key challenges ahead
    Jim Redden
      Specific Course Requirements
      As this is an intensive and highly interactive course, the Institute requires students undertaking this course to attend each of the three modules
      Small Group Discovery Experience
      Throughout lectures and seminars, there are small group activities and exercises requiring students to either problem solve, share their experiences or debate specific trade and development issues as they arise.  The final assignment requires students to work in small groups or in pairs sharing research findings and useful material on the topic they have been allocated.
    • Assessment

      The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

      1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
      2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
      3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
      4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

      Assessment Summary
      There are four (4) components to the assessment for this course. Each part of the assessment is compulsory. 
      Assessment Task Task Type Due Weighting Learning Outcome
      Assignment 1: Case Study Critique Summative

      Friday 27 March

      20% 1,2
      Assignment 2: Trade & Development report and presentation Summative Presentation - Friday 8 May
      Report - Friday 22 May
      35% 1,2,3,4,5,6
      Class Participation Summative Ongoing 5%
      Final Examination Summative Please check your personal examination timetable via Access Adelaide 40% 1,2,3,4,5,6
      Assessment Detail
      There are four (4) components to the assessment for this course:

      Class Participation 5%
      Students will be assessed on their in-class contribution to topic discussions, work in small groups, contribution to discussion board on MyUni as well as for their ability to demonstrate knowledge of required readings throughout the course.

      Assignment 1 – Case-study critique 20%
      Students will compare and contrast two of the case-studies on trade, development and poverty reduction from the main text book in a short report of no more than 1,500 words

      Assignment 2 – Trade and development report and presentation 35%
      Students will prepare a draft paper on trade related strategies for effective development outcomes in a developing country allocated to them (maximum 3,500 words) and give a short power-point presentation (maximum of 15 minutes) on their report. Informed by the feedback from the lecturer and colleagues, students will then complete their individual report.
      Presentation required for Module Three of the course.

      Final Written Exam 40%
      A two hour exam will include a multiple choice section followed by a section requiring essay style answers. More detail and past exam questions will be given to students during module 3 of the course.
      Please refer to Examination timetable
      Submission
      Assignments must be submitted two ways:

      1. Softcopy through Turnitin on MyUni
      AND
      2. Hardcopy in the assignment drop-box. This is located on the ground floor of Nexus 10 (10 Pulteney St)

      All assignments must be presented professionally with clear headings, appropriate referencing and using one and a half spacing.

      Extensions will only be granted if requests are received in writing to the course coordinator at least 24 hours before the final due date unless they are requested on medical or compassionate grounds and are supported by appropriate documents. Late assignments will be penalised.

      Your assignment must include the IIT assignment cover sheet which can be downloaded from MyUni under “Assignments”. Each page must be numbered with your student ID and name.

      Please contact the course coordinator, preferably by email, for assistance or guidance in relation to course work, assignments or any concerns that may arise. Assignments will normally be returned two weeks after they have been submitted.
      Course Grading

      Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

      M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
      Grade Mark Description
      FNS   Fail No Submission
      F 1-49 Fail
      P 50-64 Pass
      C 65-74 Credit
      D 75-84 Distinction
      HD 85-100 High Distinction
      CN   Continuing
      NFE   No Formal Examination
      RP   Result Pending

      Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

      Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

      Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

    • Student Feedback

      The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

      SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    • Student Support
    • Policies & Guidelines
    • Fraud Awareness

      Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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