TRADE 7009 - International Aid and Trade

North Terrace Campus - Trimester 3 - 2016

This course examines issues related to the effectiveness of foreign aid on poverty reduction and the role of 'aid for trade' in achieving sustainable development. It begins by examining the debate over the motivations for aid - comparing and contrasting poverty reduction objectives with the role of economic and commercial objectives, political diplomacy and strategic objectives. Students have the opportunity to evaluate the success of aid in promoting economic growth and poverty reduction in developing countries in recent decades using a range of monitoring and evaluation tools. This includes discussion of the factors that shape aid effectiveness, including contextual political economy issues, social factors including gender and disability issues and factors related to the ways in which donors deliver and administer aid. This knowledge forms the basis for deeper analysis of the role and effectiveness of 'aid for trade'. As a relatively recent phenomenon, we analyse the contribution it can make to the development of trade agreements and achievement of sustainable trade related development goals. We also evaluate the role of the private sector in the design and delivery of effective 'aid for trade' programs. Practical case-studies, guest speakers from the aid and trade sector and interactive small group activities feature throughout.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code TRADE 7009
    Course International Aid and Trade
    Coordinating Unit Institute for International Trade
    Term Trimester 3
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact 1 week intensive
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Quota A quota of 24 applies
    Course Description This course examines issues related to the effectiveness of foreign aid on poverty reduction and the role of 'aid for trade' in achieving sustainable development. It begins by examining the debate over the motivations for aid - comparing and contrasting poverty reduction objectives with the role of economic and commercial objectives, political diplomacy and strategic objectives. Students have the opportunity to evaluate the success of aid in promoting economic growth and poverty reduction in developing countries in recent decades using a range of monitoring and evaluation tools. This includes discussion of the factors that shape aid effectiveness, including contextual political economy issues, social factors including gender and disability issues and factors related to the ways in which donors deliver and administer aid. This knowledge forms the basis for deeper analysis of the role and effectiveness of 'aid for trade'. As a relatively recent phenomenon, we analyse the contribution it can make to the development of trade agreements and achievement of sustainable trade related development goals. We also evaluate the role of the private sector in the design and delivery of effective 'aid for trade' programs. Practical case-studies, guest speakers from the aid and trade sector and interactive small group activities feature throughout.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mr Jim Redden

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    1 Understand key determinants of global poverty and the role of aid in dealing with the challenge of poverty alleviation
    2 Understand the variety of objectives, motivations, forms and modes of delivery of aid including mechanisms for evaluating aid effectiveness
    3 Evaluate the effectiveness of aid in advancing economic development in developing countries amidst the complexity of trade and investment flows, debt relief and governance issues.
    4 Analyse of the role of Aid for Trade, how it can underpin trade agreements and its capacity to contribute to sustainable development including the role of the private sector in its design and delivery
    5 Research, critically analyse and develop recommendations on the future of aid and ‘aid for trade’ in reducing global poverty
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Required readings will be provided online via MyUni. The list will comprise of readings on:
    - Aid - Handout of References
    - Aid and the MDGs 2015
    - Aid and the Sustainable Development Goals 2030
    - WTO and Aid for Trade
    - Enhanced Integrated Framework (EIF)
    - Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness
    - ACCRA agenda for Action
    - Role of the Private Sector in Development and Aid for Trade
    Recommended Resources

    Asia Development Bank, (July 2015) Aid for Trade in Asia and the Pacific: Thinking Forward About Trade Costs and the Digital Economy, www.adb.org/publications/aid-trade-asia-and-pacific


    Lowy Institute, (2015), The State of Australian Foreign Aid, Sydney, Australian, available at www.lowyinstitute.orgLowy Institute, (2015), The State of Australian Foreign Aid, Sydney, Australian, available at www.lowyinstitute.org


    Dan Ben-David, Hakan Nordstrom, Alan Winters (1999): “Trade, Income Disparity & Poverty”, WTO Special Studies, WTO Publications, Geneva, available at www.wto.org/english/res_e/booksp_e/special_study_5_e.pdf


    Columbia University (2009) articles by Sachs J & George A., 'Can Foreign Aid Reduce Poverty?", Cases for and against, Earth Columbia, CQ press.


    Chossudovsky, M. (1999): “The Globalisation of Poverty: Impacts of IMF and World Bank Reforms”, Zed Books.


    Cameron, H. & Njinkeu, D. (ed.) 2009:“Aid for Trade and Development”, Cambridge University Press.


    Browne, S. (2006): “Aid and Influence: Do Donors Help or Hinder?”, Earthscan Publications, London and Sterling.


    Brown, O. (2006): “Trade, Aid and the Millennium Development Goals: Reaching the Goals in an Insecure World”, IISD Commentary, March 2006, available at http://www.iisd.org/pdf/2006/commentary_tas_2.pdf


    Bergeron S. (2003): “The Post-Washington Consensus and Economic Representations of Women in Development at the World Bank”, International Feminist Journal of Politics, Volume 5, Issue 3, November 2003, pp. 397- 419.


    AusAID/DFAT policy on trade and development http://www.ausaid.gov.au/aidissues/economicgrowth/Documents/Trade%20and%20Development%20Statement.pdf


    AusAID (2007): “Annual Review of Development Effectiveness 2007”, Office of Development Effectiveness, Canberra. Available at www.ode.ausaid.gov.au/publications/pdf/arde_report-2007.pdf


    AusAID/DFAT (2014) “Australia’s New Aid Paradigm”, see video featuring the Foreign Minister and then three central policy documents on “Australia's new development policy and performance framework” Canberra 2014. Available at: http://aid.dfat.gov.au/aidpolicy/Pages/home.aspx


    Accenture (2012), “Business in Development Study 2012”, Business for Millennium Development publication, see the executive summary pp 7 - 15


    http://www.wto.org/english/res_e/publications_e/aid4trade13_e.htm


    A WTO joint publication,(2013) “Aid for Trade at a Glance: Connecting to Value Chains”


    Global Development Problems, Solutions, Strategy: A Proposal for Socially Just, Ecologically Sustainable Growth”, International Books.


    Easterly, W. (2006): “The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good”, Penguin Books, New York.


    Edwards, M. (1999): “Future Positive: International Co-operation in the 21st Century”, Earthscan Publications, London and Sterling.


    George, S. (1986): “How the Other Half Dies: The Real Reasons for World Hunger”, Penguin Books Ltd.


    George, S. (1988):“A Fate Worse Than Debt”, Grove Press, New York.


    Groves L. and Hinton R. (eds.) (2006): “Inclusive Aid: Changing Power and Relationships in International Development”, Earthscan Publications, London and Sterling.


    Higgins, K. & Prowse, S. (2011): “Trade, Growth and Poverty: Making Aid for Trade Work for Inclusive Growth and Poverty Reduction”, Working Paper 313, Overseas Development Institute, London, available at http://www.odi.org.uk/resources/details.asp?id=4714&title=aid-trade-growth-poverty-reduction


    Hoekman, B.,(2010) “Doha and Development: Market Access, Trade Costs and Aid for Trade”, published by Vox EU June 2010


    Hoekman, B., Mattoo, A. & English, P. (ed.) (2002): “Development, Trade and the WTO”, The World Bank, Washington D.C.


    International Trade Centre (2014), “ITC and Aid for Trade: Trade Impact for Good” http://www.intracen.org/itc/about/mission-and-objectives/aid-for-trade/


    Kamal, M. (2004): “Trade, Growth, Poverty Reduction and Human Development: Some Linkages and Policy Implications”, paper prepared for the XVIII G-24 Technical Group Meeting, Palais de Nations, Geneva, available at http://www.g24.org/TGM0304.htm.


    Lancaster C. (2007): “Foreign Aid: Diplomacy, Development, Domestic Politics”, University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London.


    Manor J. (2007) (ed.): “Aid That Works: Successful Development in Fragile States”, World Bank, Washington DC.


    OECD (2005): “The Paris Declaration and Accra Agenda for Action”, available at http://www.oecd.org/document/19/0,3343,en_2649_3236398_43554003_1_1_1_1,00.html


    OECD/WTO (2015): “Aid for Trade at a Glance 2015”, available at http://www.oecd.org/aidfortrade/


    Paris, B. (1999): “Trade for Development: Making the WTO Work for the Poor”, World Vision Discussion Paper, Victoria.


    Puri, L. (2005): “Towards a new trade “Marshall Plan” for Least Developed Countries, How to Deliver on the Doha Development Promise and Help Realize the UN Millennium Development Goals?”, UNCTAD Study Series NËš1 on Trade, Poverty and Cross-cutting Development Issues, New York and Geneva.


    Radelet S. (2006): “A Primer on Foreign Aid”, Center for Global Development, Working Paper No. 92, July 2006, available at http://www.cgdev.org/content/publications/detail/8846.


    Reeve R. (2007) “Hot-Spotting: An Australian delivering foreign aid”, Wakefield Press, South Australia.


    Sachs J. (2005): “The End of Poverty”, Time, 14 March, pp 42-54.


    San Sebastian, M., Hurtig, A. & Rasanathan, K. (2006): “Is Trade Liberalisation of Services the Best Strategy to Achieve Health-related Millennium Development Goals in Latin America? A call for caution”, available at http://www.journal.paho.org/uploads/1169157100.pdf


    Sogge, D. (2002): “Give and Take: What’s the Matter with Foreign Aid”, New York along with a range of other publishers around the world.


    Soros, G. (2002):“George Soros on Globalization”, Public Affairs, New York.


    Stiglitz, J. (2002):“Globalization and its Discontents”, W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., New York.


    The Economist (2009): “Special Report on Telecoms in Emerging Markets”, 24 September 2009.


    The World Bank (2005): “Pro-Poor Growth in the 1990s: Lessons and Insights from 14 Countries”, Washington D.C.


    UN (2009a): “Millennium Development Goal 8, Strengthening the Global Partnership for Development in a Time of Crisis”, MDG Gap Task Force, Report 2009. New York.


    UN (2009b): “The Millennium Development Goals”, Report 2009, New York.


    UN Millennium Project (2005): “Investing in Development: A Practical Plan to Achieve the Millennium Development Goals”, New York: UNDP, WWW document, available at http://www.unmillenniumproject.org/documents/overviewEngLowRes.pdf.


    UNCTAD (2004): “The Least Developed Countries Report 2004: Linking International Trade with Poverty Reduction”, UNCTAD/LDC/2004, Geneva.


    UNCTAD (2006): “The Least Developed Countries Report 2006: Developing Productive Capacities”, UNCTAD/LDC/2006”, Geneva.


    UNCTAD (2008): “Delivering on the Global Partnership for Achieving the Millennium Development Goals”, MDG Gap Task Force Report 2008, New York.


    UNCTAD (2009): “Strengthening the Global Partnership for Development in a Time of Crisis”, MDG Gap Task Force Report 2009, New York.


    Van de Walle, N. (2005): “Overcoming Stagnation in Aid-dependent Countries”, Center for Global Development, Washington DC, available at http://www.cgdev.org/content/publications/detail/2871


    Vandemoortele, J., Malhotra, K. & Lim, J. (2003): “Is MDG8 on Track as a Global Deal for Human Development?”, United Nations Development Programme and Bureau for Development Policy, NY


    Wach H. and Reeves H. (2000): “Gender and Development: Facts and Figures”, BRIDGE, Institute of Development Studies, available at http://www.bridge.ids.ac.uk/reports.html


    World Bank & IMF (2011): “The MDGs after the Crisis”, Global Monitoring Report 2011, Washington D.C.


    WTO, (2015), "Implementing the Trade Faciliation Agreement", www.wto.org/english/res_e/aid4trade15_chap4_e.pdf


    WTO (2008):“World Trade Report 2008”, pp 147-161, available at www.wto.org/english/res_e/booksp.../world_trade_report08_e.pdf


    WTO (2011a): “Market Access for Products and Services of Export Interest to Least-Developed Countries”, WT/COMTD/LDC/W/46/Rev.1, 26 February 2011.


    WTO (2013)“9th WTO Ministerial Conference Bali, Briefing note: Development and Technical Assistance”


    http://www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/minist_e/mc9_e/brief_devel_e.htm


    WTO (2013), Fourth Global Review of Aid for Trade: Connecting to Value Chains


    http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/devel_e/a4t_e/4th_AFT_Summary_Report_side_events_E_v4.pdf
    Online Learning
    In addition to the above, students will find it useful to explore the websites of the World Bank and regional banks, UN Millennium Development Challenge, UNDP, UNCTAD, ITC, IMF, OECD, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Australia, ICSTD and Oxfam. Other references and websites will be discussed during the course but do note websites below for information on the Sustainable Development Goals for 2030 which have replaced the Millennium Development Goals.

    http://www.am.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/mdgoverview/post-2015-development-agenda.html

    http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2015/jan/19/sustainable-development-goals-united-nations
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The Institute expects students undertaking this elective to attend each day of the intensive course which will constitute approximately 35 hours of participation time and to then devote an additional 120 hours or around 3 weeks to research, reading and undertaking the assignments
    Learning Activities Summary
    Day Topic
    One (Monday) - Course overview and assessment
    - Globalisation: wealth creation, inequality and poverty
    - Underlying causes of extreme poverty and possible solutions
    - The history and objectives of aid
    - Contemporary debates on the role of aid in development
    Two (Tuesday) - Types of aid and modes of delivery
    - Donors, partnership, leadership and ownership
    - Critical factors in the practical delivery of aid - case-studies
    - Case-study on Australian aid
    - Evaluating the effectivness of aid - Mutual Accountability
    - Assignment
    Three (Wednesday) - Evalutaing the effectiveness of aid - Monitoring and Evaluation
    - Role of aid in governance, gender and human rights – case-studies
    - Future aid challenges and the new Sustainable Development Goals
    - Role of aid in context of trade, debt, financial flows and governance
    Four (Thursday) - What is aid for trade, history and purpose
    - Measuring and monitoring aid for trade
    - Key debates about aid for trade
    - Case-studies: Pacifc, Indonesia, Africa
    - Aid for trade and trade agreements
    Five (Friday) - Private sector delivery of aid for trade
    - Aid and trade: case-studies continued
    - Major research assignment and student presentations
    - Course summary and evaluation
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Students will be assessed on their class participation, case-study and major assignment. Details of the assignments will be discussed with students on the first day of the course.

    The assessment components are as follows:
    Assessment Task Task Type Due Weighting Learning Outcome
    Assignment 1: Case Study  Summative

    TBC

    25% 1,2,3
    Assignment 2: Major Research Report Summative TBC 70% 1,2,3,4,5
    Class participantion Summative - 5% 1,2,3,4,5
    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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  • Policies & Guidelines
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