PLANT SC 3500WT - Biotechnology in the Food & Wine Industries III

Waite Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

This course covers the application of biotechnology to increase the nutritional composition and safety of food and beverages, for developed and developing nations. Emphasis is given to approaches that increase the nutritional value of food and/or the sustainability of food production covering all aspects of the value chain from paddock to plate. Examples include DNA marker-assisted selection to fast track classical breeding methods for improved plants, animals and microorganisms, genetic modification (GM) approaches and enzyme engineering for efficient food processing and production, non-alcoholic and alcoholic fermentations, food additives. The role of the community, media and government in delivering safe, ethical and sustainable biotechnology solutions is investigated through current examples.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PLANT SC 3500WT
    Course Biotechnology in the Food & Wine Industries III
    Coordinating Unit School of Agriculture, Food and Wine
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Waite Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 7 hours per week for 6 weeks
    Incompatible PLANT SC 3515WT
    Assumed Knowledge AGRIC 2500WT or AGRIC 2500RW or equivalent
    Course Description This course covers the application of biotechnology to increase the nutritional composition and safety of food and beverages, for developed and developing nations. Emphasis is given to approaches that increase the nutritional value of food and/or the sustainability of food production covering all aspects of the value chain from paddock to plate. Examples include DNA marker-assisted selection to fast track classical breeding methods for improved plants, animals and microorganisms, genetic modification (GM) approaches and enzyme engineering for efficient food processing and production, non-alcoholic and alcoholic fermentations, food additives. The role of the community, media and government in delivering safe, ethical and sustainable biotechnology solutions is investigated through current examples.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Carolyn Schultz

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    The anticipated knowledge, skills and/or attitude to be developed by the student are:

    Demonstrated ability to
    1 Predict changes to an organism using genetic engineering when provided with a biochemical pathway and knowledge of the gene construct
    2 Evaluate relative advantage and disadvantages of genetic modification (GM) and non-GM strategies to solve real-life problems
    3 Apply a range of biotechnological solutions to improve the nutrition of food and/or the sustainability of food production for future generations
    4 Use terminology, appropriate to the field of biotechnology, correctly and contextually
    5 Conduct, analyse and interpret results of experiments, and effectively communicate these in written reports
    6 Cooperate and work effectively as a member of a team to critically evaluate scientific research papers and develop a project proposal to address identified gaps
    7 Explain the benefits and limitations (scientific and ethical) of biotechnology relative to existing practice
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1-6
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 5,6
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 5,6
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 5,6
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 1-6
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 6
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 6
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    This course will require the following texts and other resources:

    Lectures – lecture handouts will be provided to facilitate note taking. Lectures will be recorded wherever possible and uploaded to MyUni.

    Practicals – a practical manual will be provided. Students will need to provide their own lab coat and safety glasses and wear enclosed shoes.
    Online Learning
    Diagnostic and formative assessments are included in pre-lecture online activities.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    6 x 2 Hour Lecture blocks
    5 x 1 hour Tutorial (weeks 8 to 12)
    4 Practicals of 4 hours (weeks 8 to 11)
    1 team based Project Proposal


    • 1 x 4 hr Computer Practical / Workshop on Peer Review and Information Gathering in the first week
    • includes formative tasks, group work and question time in tutorials to assist in preparation of the Project Proposal
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    This course is taught in either Weeks 7 to 12 or 8 to 13 to accommodate the Industry Placement/Experience in the Bachelor of Food and Nutrition Science and Bachelor of Viticulture and Oenology Programs, respectively.

    A student enrolled in a 3 unit course, such as this, should expect to spend, on average 24 hours per week on the studies required. This includes both the formal contact time required to the course (e.g., lectures and practicals), as well as non-contact time (e.g., reading and revision).

    Learning Activities Summary

    The course content will include the following:

    Lecture Outlines – Lecture order may change from year to year

    Lectures 1 to 6. Dr Carolyn Schultz

    1. Biotechnology for wine-makers and food technologists - why? Traditional methods of plant improvement. Plant Improvement using molecular markers: types of marker systems their relative advantages and disadvantages.
    2. Application of molecular markers (as used in forensics): for improved ecological sustainability, human health, novel functions and protection of crop varieties and yeast strains.
    3. The emerging technologies and their potential applications. Transgenic plants: What, why and how?
    4. Strategies and targets for genetic manipulations of cereals, grapevines and other food crops.
    5. Limitations and potential risks of GM crops. Role of OGTR and FSANZ in risk assessment. Examples of released transgenic crops.
    6. Biotechnology in food safety, quality control and nutrition: Use of human cell lines to compare bioavailability of nutrients.

    Lectures 7 to 10. Dr Rachel Burton 

    The commercial use of enzymes in industries such as cheese manufacture, the production of sweeteners and wine production, will be discussed in the context of enzymic properties that are required for large scale processes. In addition, the role of plant cell wall components and carbohydrate-modifying enzymes will be related to burgeoning interest in human health and nutrition, and in renewable biofuel production.

    Lectures 11 & 12. Dr Paul Chambers (Australian Wine Research Institute)

    Fermentation in wine and food: Pure cultures, their selection, generation and maintenance. Role of microorganisms. Potential for manipulation to improve fermentation efficiency and control of by-products. Designing organisms to suit specific processes and processors.

    Practicals

    Prac 1 (weeks 8 & 9): Techniques for the identification and comparison of genetically modified organisms.

    Prac 2 (weeks 10 & 11): Use of a recombinant enzyme to reduce flour viscosity in food processing.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment taskType of assessmentPercentage of total assessment for grading purposesHurdle (Yes/No)Outcomes being assessed
    Pre-lecture online tasks Diagnostic 0% No
    Examination Summative 40% Yes 1-4
    Practical reports Formative/Summative 30% Yes* 4,5
    Project Proposal Formative/Summative 30% Yes* 4,6,7

    * Collectively forms a hurdle. To pass the course, a student must obtain a minimum of 40% in the combined mark for the practicals & project proposal (i.e. 24 out of 60) and 40% for the written exam(s). There will be no additional assessment for the practical work or project proposal.

    Assessment Related Requirements

    Participation at all practical sessions is compulsory and will include compulsory online formative assessment tasks. These formative assessment tasks (pre- and/or during practical classes) are designed to guide students to the important material required for the practical report. A minimum standard will need to be achieved and students may re-submit to improve their mark.

    Assessment Detail
    Exam: (40% of total course grade). A final exam will assess the students’ knowledge, their ability to apply knowledge and their critical analysis skills.

    Practical Reports: (30% of total course grade). Two Practical Reports, one for each two week practical. Prac 1 is a full practical report write up (Aims, Introduction, Results, Discussion, Conclusion). The assessment task for Prac 2 gets students to focus on data presentation and summarising key points from four different, but related experiments. A formative assessment component is included to provide students with feedback before submission of the final assessment task. Students will receive written feedback on each of practical reports submitted for assessment.

    Project Proposal (30% of total course grade): “Developing Convincing Project Proposals”. This assessment task involves a peer-supported learning environment, where students learn to confidently critique scientific papers and discuss scientific methods, formulate questions and devise experiments to address specific questions, summarise the important knowledge and gaps in an area of global significance and effectively communicate in written form to produce a document of a professional standard. There is a formative peer feedback component in the Week 11 or 12 tutorial. Successful completion (on-time according to written instructions) together with self and peer-evaluation of contributions throughout the project will provide evidence of interpersonal and life-long learning skills such as time management.

    Diagnostic and formative assessments are included in pre-lecture online activities and lecture activities such as “think pair share”, quizzes and group discussions in class.
    Submission

    Late submission of assessments

    If an extension is not applied for, or not granted then a penalty for late submission will apply. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for each calendar day that is late (i.e. weekends count as 2 days), up to a maximum of 50% of the available marks will be applied. This means that an assignment that is 5 days or more late without an approved extension can only receive a maximum of 50% of the mark.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.