PLANT SC 3500WT - Biotechnology in the Food & Wine Industries III

Waite Campus - Semester 1 - 2017

This course covers the application of biotechnology to increase the nutritional composition and safety of food and beverages, for developed and developing nations. Emphasis is given to approaches that increase the nutritional value of food and/or the sustainability of food production covering all aspects of the value chain from paddock to plate. Examples include DNA marker-assisted selection to fast track classical breeding methods for improved plants, animals and microorganisms, genetic modification (GM) approaches and enzyme engineering for efficient food processing and production, non-alcoholic and alcoholic fermentations, food additives. The role of the community, media and government in delivering safe, ethical and sustainable biotechnology solutions is investigated through current examples.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PLANT SC 3500WT
    Course Biotechnology in the Food & Wine Industries III
    Coordinating Unit School of Agriculture, Food and Wine
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Waite Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 7 hours per week for 6 weeks
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible PLANT SC 3515WT
    Assumed Knowledge AGRIC 2500WT or AGRIC 2500RW or equivalent
    Course Description This course covers the application of biotechnology to increase the nutritional composition and safety of food and beverages, for developed and developing nations. Emphasis is given to approaches that increase the nutritional value of food and/or the sustainability of food production covering all aspects of the value chain from paddock to plate. Examples include DNA marker-assisted selection to fast track classical breeding methods for improved plants, animals and microorganisms, genetic modification (GM) approaches and enzyme engineering for efficient food processing and production, non-alcoholic and alcoholic fermentations, food additives. The role of the community, media and government in delivering safe, ethical and sustainable biotechnology solutions is investigated through current examples.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Karina Riggs

    Dr Karina Riggs
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    The anticipated knowledge, skills and/or attitude to be developed by the student are:

    Demonstrated ability to
    1 Predict changes to an organism using genetic engineering when provided with a biochemical pathway and knowledge of the gene construct
    2 Evaluate relative advantage and disadvantages of genetic modification (GM) and non-GM strategies to solve real-life problems
    3 Apply a range of biotechnological solutions to improve the nutrition of food and/or the sustainability of food production for future generations
    4 Use terminology, appropriate to the field of biotechnology, correctly and contextually
    5 Conduct, analyse and interpret results of experiments, and effectively communicate these in written reports
    6 Cooperate and work effectively as a member of a team to critically evaluate scientific research papers and develop a project proposal to address identified gaps
    7 Explain the benefits and limitations (scientific and ethical) of biotechnology relative to existing practice
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 4, 7
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 2, 3, 5, 7
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    5-6
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1-7
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    5-7
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    6-7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    A lab coat, safety glasses and closed footwear must be worn in every practical session.
    Recommended Resources
    Recommended Reading

    Communication


    Cargill M and Bellotti M. (2004) Written Communicatio int eh Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences. The University of Adelaide.
    http://www.agwine.adelaide.edu.au/students/external/carwripg1.pdf.


    Biotechnology


    Belitz HD and Grosch W. (1987) Food Chemistry (2nd edn.). Springer Verlag. Berlin.

    Burton RA et al. (2006) Cellulolse synthase-like CsIF genes medicate the synthesis of cell callus (1,3;1,4)-B-D-glucans. Science. 311: 1940-1942

    Collin P et al. (2004) The safe threshold for gluten contamination in gluten-free products. Can trace amounts be accepted in the treatment of coeliac disease? Aliment Parmacol ther. 19: 1277-1283

    Hansen HB et al. (2004) Grain characteristics, chemical composition and functional properties of rye as influcenced by genotype and harvest year. J Agric Food Chem. 52: 2282-2291

    Hischenhuber C et al. (2006) Review article: Safe amounts of gluten for patients with wheat allergy or coeliac disease. Aliment Parmacol Ther. 23: 559-575

    Holtekjolen ADK et al. (2006) Contents of starch and non-starch polysaccharides in barley varieties of different origin. Food Chem. 94: 348-358

    Keegstra K and Walton J. (2006) Beta-glucans-brewer's bane, dieticians delight. Science. 311: 1872-1873

    Shewry PR and Halford NG. (2002) Cereal seed storage proteins: structures, properties and role in grain utilisation. J. Exp. Bot. 53: 947-858

    Spaenij-dekking L et al. (2005) Natural variation in toxicity of wheat. Potential for selction of non-toxic varieties of coeliac disease patients. Gastroenterology. 129: 797-806

    Tamine AY et al. (1998) Laboratory made Kishk from wheat, oat and barley: 1. Production and comparison of chemical and nutritional composition of Burghol. Food Res Intl. 30: 311-317

    Online Learning
    Teaching and course materials will be posted in MyUni (http://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/). Lectures will be recorded and posted on MyUni.

    Interactive pre-laboratory activities will be used in formative assessment.


  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures are supported by online activities and laboratory work that develop and reinforce material covered in lectures. The practicals  allow students to synthesise and apply the skills learned in the course to address practical situations. The project proposal work in weeks 7-12 allow students to develop skills in critiquing scientific papers, solving globally significant problems as a team and communicate scientific knowledge in written form to a professional standard.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    6 x 2 hour lectures
    5 x 1 hour Tutorial (weeks 8 to 12)
    4 Practicals of 4 hours (weeks 8 to 11)
    1 team based Project Proposal
    1 x 4 hr Computer Practical/ Workshop on Peer Review and Information Gathering in the first week; includes formative tasks,
    group work and question time in tutorials to assist in preparation of the Project Proposal

    This course is taught in either Weeks 7 to 12 or 8 to 13 to accommodate the Industry Placement/Experience in the Bachelor of Food and Nutrition Science and Bachelor of Viticulture and Oenology Programs, respectively.

    A student enrolled in a 3 unit course, such as this, should expect to spend, on average 24 hours per week on the studies required. This includes both the formal contact time required to the course (e.g., lectures and practicals), as well as non-contact time (e.g., reading and revision).

    Learning Activities Summary

    The course content will include the following:

    Week 7
    Lecture 1: Biotechnology for wine makers and food technologists
    Lecture 2: Molecular markers for protection of crops, yeasts, sustainability and human health
    Tutorial: Introduction to the Project Proposal
    Practical: Databases for finding scientific resources

    Week 8
    Lecture 3: Genetically modified (transgenic) plants
    Lecture 4: Genetic manipulation of cereals, other food crops and grape vines
    Tutorial: Project proposal- Researching a topic
    Practical: Techniques for the identification and comparison of Genetically Modified Organisms

    Week 9
    Lecture 5: Limitations and risks of GM crops- OGTR/FSANZ
    Lecture 6: Biotechnology in food safety, quality control and nutrition
    Tutorial: Project proposal- Defining the research question
    Practical: (continued) Techniques for the identification and comparison of
    Genetically Modified Organisms

    Week 10
    Lecture 7: Commercial use of enzymes in industry - Part 1
    Lecture 8: Commercial use of enzymes in industry - Part 2
    Tutorial: Project proposal- Assessment criteria and examples
    Practical: Use of a recombinant enzyme to reduce viscosity in the food and
    beverage industry

    Week 11
    Lecture 9: Plant cell walls, carbohydrates and human health
    Lecture 10: Plant cell walls and renewable biofuel production
    Tutorial: Project proposal- examples part 2
    Practical: (continued) Use of a recombinant enzyme to reduce viscosity in the
    food and beverage industry

    Week 12
    Lecture 11: Fermentation in wine and food - Part 1
    Lecture 12: Fermentation in wine and food - Part 2
    Practical: Project proposal- finalising the proposal and peer assessment

    Note: Lecture order may change from year to year depending on lecturer availability.


    Specific Course Requirements
    Attendance at practicals and tutorials in compulsory.

    To pass the course, a student must obtain a minimum of 40% for the written exam(s). There will be no additional assessment for the
    practical work or project proposal.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment taskType of assessmentPercentage of total assessment for grading purposesHurdle (Yes/No)Outcomes being assessed
    Pre-lecture online tasks Diagnostic 0% No
    Examination Summative 40% Yes 1-4
    Practical reports Formative/Summative 30% No 4,5
    Project Proposal Formative/Summative 30% No 4,6,7

    To pass the course, a student must obtain a minimum of 40% for the written exam(s). There will be no additional assessment for the practical work or project proposal.

    Assessment Related Requirements

    Attendance to all tutorial and practical sessions is compulsory and will include compulsory online formative assessment tasks (practicals only). These formative assessment tasks (pre- and/or during practical classes) are designed to guide students to the important material required for the practical report. A minimum standard will need to be achieved and students may re-submit to improve their mark. There will be no opportunity for additional assessment on the practical or project proposal components of the course.

    To pass this course, a student must obtain a minimum of 40% for the written exam (hurdle requirement).


    Assessment Detail
    Exam: (40% of total course grade). A final exam will assess the students’ knowledge, ability to apply knowledge and critical analysis skills.

    Practical Reports: (30% of total course grade). Two practical reports (extending across 2 weeks, 15% each).
    Practical 1: Identification of Genetically Modified Organsims; is a complete practical report write up including Aims, Introduction, Results, Discussion, Conclusion and Reference list.

    Practical 2: Recombinant enzymes in food processing; focuses on data presentation and summarising key points from four different, but related experiments. A formative assessment component is included to provide students with feedback before submission of the final assessment task.

    Students will receive written feedback on each practical report submitted for assessment.

    Project Proposal: (30% of total course grade): “Developing Convincing Project Proposals”. This assessment task involves a peer-supported learning environment, where students learn to confidently critique scientific papers and discuss scientific methods, formulate questions and devise experiments to address specific questions, summarise the important knowledge and gaps in an area of global significance and effectively communicate in written form to produce a document of a professional standard. There is a formative peer feedback component in the Week 11 or 12 tutorial. Successful completion (on-time according to written instructions) together with self and peer-evaluation of contributions throughout the project will provide evidence of interpersonal and life-long learning skills such as time management.

    Diagnostic and formative assessments are included in pre-lecture online activities and lecture activities such as “think pair share”, quizzes and group discussions in class.
    Submission

    Late submission of assessments

    If an extension is not applied for, or not granted then a penalty for late submission will apply. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for each calendar day that is late (i.e. weekends count as 2 days), up to a maximum of 50% of the available marks will be applied. This means that an assignment that is 5 days or more late without an approved extension can only receive a maximum of 50% of the mark.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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