HIST 5006EX - Celebrating Food

External - Semester 1 - 2014

All societies use food in their secular and religious celebrations to convey both specific and general meanings. Food often is the specific focus of a festival, whether of a particular culture or a geographically-defined space. Taking an historical perspective but drawing on an interdisciplinary base of scholarship, this course examines the evolution of the symbolic roles of food in culture and society with particular attention to the building and maintenance of families, communities, nations, and other groups through food-based celebrations. The course begins with an historical overview on banquets, feasting, and related food-events, and the concept of commensality. It surveys food and drink habits related to religious celebrations, including feasts associated with major eastern and western traditions. It also explores family-based celebrations using food and drink, including secular rituals associated with daily activities as well as significant life-cycle events. Community-based festivals focused on or involving food and drink in central ways are another focus of the course, with special attention to the use of food and drink to build or assert identity. The course concludes with discussion of uses of food and drink to recognize and celebrate heritage or tradition, including as nostalgic devices to re-create (or create) the past.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 5006EX
    Course Celebrating Food
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s External
    Units 6
    Contact Online
    Course Description All societies use food in their secular and religious celebrations to convey both specific and general meanings. Food often is the specific focus of a festival, whether of a particular culture or a geographically-defined space. Taking an historical perspective but drawing on an interdisciplinary base of scholarship, this course examines the evolution of the symbolic roles of food in culture and society with particular attention to the building and maintenance of families, communities, nations, and other groups through food-based celebrations. The course begins with an historical overview on banquets, feasting, and related food-events, and the concept of commensality. It surveys food and drink habits related to religious celebrations, including feasts associated with major eastern and western traditions. It also explores family-based celebrations using food and drink, including secular rituals associated with daily activities as well as significant life-cycle events. Community-based festivals focused on or involving food and drink in central ways are another focus of the course, with special attention to the use of food and drink to build or assert identity. The course concludes with discussion of uses of food and drink to recognize and celebrate heritage or tradition, including as nostalgic devices to re-create (or create) the past.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Laura Prosperi

    Dr Laura Prosperi, Course Coordinator
    School of History and Politics
    508 Napier Building
    laura.prosperi@adelaide.edu.au
    Phone 8313 0054

    A/Prof Rachel A. Ankeny, Program Coordinator
    School of History & Politics
    311 Napier Building
    rachel.ankeny@adelaide.edu.au
    Phone: 8313-5570
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Not applicable.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate:
    1 Familiarity with the variety of disciplinary approaches relevant to understanding food and celebration.
    2 Understanding of and ability to apply the appropriate methodologies for research into food and drink celebrations.
    3 Appreciation of the relevance of food and drink practices to the building of families, communities, and nations.
    4 Understanding of the concepts of commensality, heritage, tradition, and identity in relation to celebrations centrally involving food and drink.
    5 The skills which allow students to give analytical and focused presentations.
    6 The skills of written expression and argumentation which permit students to present a well-constructed and well-supported historical argument on a selected topic relating to celebratory uses of food/drink.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1 - 4
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1 - 2, 6
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 5 - 6
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2, 6
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1 - 6
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 3 - 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Required readings will be made available in electronic form via the course’s MyUni site.
    Recommended Resources
    A list of recommended resources will be made available via the course’s MyUni site including links to online versions of resources where available and to the library’s resource guide for food studies. Additional materials including essay writing and reference guides will be made available via MyUni, and Turnitin will be utilized via MyUni. Students have access to computing suites as well as IT support via the University, and are provided with a printing quota each semester. Other resources will be provided via the course MyUni site.
    Online Learning
    A course website will be available via MyUni at https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/webapps/login/ once the course begins, and all students must make access to this site to complete the course. Portfolio entries must be posted regularly via this site, and all assessment tasks will be submitted via MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Online lectures, tutorials and assessment tasks are the main modes of learning supplemented by structured learning activities which support building the knowledge and skills which are the main foci of the course.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements, and are based on approximations of average workload per week of the intensive term. During some parts of the term, workload may be heavy or lighter.
    Virtual classroom lectures: 1 hour/week
    Virtual tutorials: 2 hours/week.

    Please note that 6-unit courses in HUMSS are designed on the assumption that all learning and assessment activities (including reading/online viewing, tutorials, preparatory work, research and writing of assignments etc.) will require approximately 312 hours.
    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Final essay (3000 words),.
    Mid-course essay (1500 words).
    Tutorial presentation (20 minutes) accompanied by written outline, assigned dates throughout the course.
    Student journal, at least one entry per topic/week, due each Friday.

    All assessment tasks are formative, and all contribute to learning objectives 1-6. This course is not exempt from any requirement of the Assessment for Coursework Programs policy
    Assessment Related Requirements
    All assessment tasks must be successfully completed in order to pass the course.
    Assessment Detail
    Final essay (3000 words), with annotated bibliography and choice of case study due in advance at date to be announced.

    Mid-course essay (1500 words), on assigned question/topic, with annotated bibliography due in advance at date to be announced.

    Tutorial presentation (20 minutes) accompanied by written outline, due on assigned dates throughout the course, presenting on a case study of the student’s choice.

    Student journal, at least one entry per topic/week, due each Friday by noon; each entry includes commentary of approximately 200-250 words with details to be provided about topics/themes, with at least 5 but no more than 8 entries.
    Submission
    All assignments will be submitted online through MyUni. For essays and tutorial presentation write-ups, this is a two-step process: the assignment first needs to be electronically submitted for marking through the course folder in MyUni by following the instructions to upload a Word Document. It then needs to be submitted separately to Turnitin, which is also done through the MyUni site. A dedicated folder will be established on MyUni for submission of journal entries.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines

    This section contains links to relevant assessment-related policies and guidelines - all university policies.

    The School of History and Politics is committed to upholding the  University's Policy on Occupational
    Health & Safety (OH&S). All staff and students have a legal responsibility to act in the interests  of themselves and others with respect to OH&S. For information on the School's contingency plan and
    emergency procedures, please see the OH&S section on the school website:

    http://www.hss.adelaide.edu.au/historypolitics/ohs
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