HIST 5007EX - Food in the City

External - Semester 2 - 2014

This course begins with historical perspectives on the relationship between the urban and the rural and, in particular, how agriculture and urban diets shape, and have been shaped by, various cities around the world. Beginning in Europe and America, it explores the development of ancient and contemporary cities in order to understand how they sustained their populations. The course analyses the merits and limitations of different methodological approaches and disciplinary perspectives (including archaeology, history, anthropology, geography, architecture, planning, sociology and literature) for scholarly research in the field. It offers historical and contemporary perspectives for understanding the relationship between the rapid industrialisation of agriculture and the expansion of more urbanised ways of life, exploring the contemporary implications of this historical evolution. The historical and contemporary development of restaurants, supermarkets and markets, urban and peri-urban agriculture and street food are examined in terms of how they have contributed to urban cultures and reshaped urban and rural natures. It will also consider the blurring of the categories of urban-rural and production-consumption in urban environments. Finally the course explores questions of sustainability and social and environmental change more broadly and the implications for planning and policy from a range of disciplinary perspectives.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 5007EX
    Course Food in the City
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s External
    Units 6
    Contact (26 July to 1 November) Online
    Course Description This course begins with historical perspectives on the relationship between the urban and the rural and, in particular, how agriculture and urban diets shape, and have been shaped by, various cities around the world. Beginning in Europe and America, it explores the development of ancient and contemporary cities in order to understand how they sustained their populations. The course analyses the merits and limitations of different methodological approaches and disciplinary perspectives (including archaeology, history, anthropology, geography, architecture, planning, sociology and literature) for scholarly research in the field. It offers historical and contemporary perspectives for understanding the relationship between the rapid industrialisation of agriculture and the expansion of more urbanised ways of life, exploring the contemporary implications of this historical evolution. The historical and contemporary development of restaurants, supermarkets and markets, urban and peri-urban agriculture and street food are examined in terms of how they have contributed to urban cultures and reshaped urban and rural natures. It will also consider the blurring of the categories of urban-rural and production-consumption in urban environments. Finally the course explores questions of sustainability and social and environmental change more broadly and the implications for planning and policy from a range of disciplinary perspectives.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Laura Prosperi

    Dr Laura Prosperi, Course Coordinator
    School of History and Politics
    508 Napier Building
    laura.prosperi@adelaide.edu.au
    Phone 8313 0054

    A/Prof Rachel A. Ankeny, Program Coordinator
    School of History & Politics
    311 Napier Building
    rachel.ankeny@adelaide.edu.au
    Phone: 8313-5570
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Not applicable.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate:
    1 Familiarity with the full range or resources from a range of disciplinary perspectives and approaches relevant to the movement of food through cities.
    2 Understanding and ability to apply the appropriate methodologies for research into urban foodways and their relationship to agriculture, globalisation and industrialisation.
    3 Appreciation of the relevance of urban food systems to a range of historical, socio-economic and political contexts
    4 Understanding of the concepts of urbanisation and industrialisation in relation to the development of urban food systems
    5 Familiarity with current debates about how cities are fed, the implications for food and agricultural systems and the relevance of sustainability to such debates.
    6 Appreciation of the range of the challenges of feeding modern cities and their importance to urban and regional planning and policy and be familiar with responses to these challenges
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1 - 4
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1 - 2, 6
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 5 - 6
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2, 6
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1 - 6
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 3 - 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Required readings will be made available in electronic form via the course’s MyUni site. Lectures
    may be available in an online form if students are absent or for review, depending on the
    technological capabilities of the classroom.
    Recommended Resources
    A list of recommended resources will be made available via the course’s MyUni site including links to online versions of resources where available and to the library’s resource guide for food studies. Additional materials including essay writing and reference guides will be made available via MyUni, and Turnitin will be utilized via MyUni. Students have access to computing suites as well as IT support via the University, and are provided with a printing quota each semester. Other resources will be provided via the course MyUni site.
    Online Learning
    A course website will be available via MyUni at https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/webapps/login/  once the course begins, and all students must make access to this site to complete the course. Journals must be posted regularly via this site, and all assessment tasks will be submitted via MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Recorded lectures, tutorials, and seminars (interactive sessions involving a variety of formats) are the main modes of learning supplemented by structured learning activities which support building the knowledge and skills which are the main foci of the course.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements, and are based on approximations of average workload per week. During some parts of the semester, workload may be heavier or lighter.

    Lectures: 1hour per week
    Tutorials: 2 hours per week
    Other structured learning activities: 3 hours per week

    The workload for this unit will include:
    Reading: 4 hours per week
    Researching and completing assignments: 2 hours per week

    Please note that 6-unit courses in HUMSS are designed on the assumption that all learning and assessment activities (including lectures, tutorials, preparatory work, research and writing of assignments etc.) will require approximately 312 hours.




    Learning Activities Summary
    • Introductory ideas, sources and disciplinary approaches with a focus on historical perspectives on agriculture, food and urbanisation.
    • History of urbanisation and industrialization with a focus on food issues.
    • The concept of productive cities: overview on the food processing in the city, the urban and peri-urban food production.
    • Urban food spaces and supply: Markets, restaurants and eating out
    • The cosmopolitan city.
    • The prevailing concern of contagion, waste and urban excesses
    • Sick cities, unhealthy bodies.
    • New urban foodscapes: Dystopian futures, utopian visions and the seeds or revolution.
    • Sustainability, planning and policy considerations.
    • Urban food activism: possibilities and problems.
    Specific Course Requirements

    Will will use Articulate and Blackboard Collaborate. Therefore, some requirements of your PC must be checked  before the commencement of the course.

    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Not applicable.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    The assessment for this course consists of four elements:

    (1) Tutorial presentation accompanied by a written outline, due on assigned individual dates during the semeater.

    (2) Mid-course essay.

    (3) Student journal consisting of at least one entry per topic/week.

    (4) Final essay.

    All assessment tasks are formative, and all contribute to learning objectives 1-6. This course is not exempt from any requirement of the Assessment for Coursework Programs policy
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Attendance at all class sessions is compulsory, and copies of the readings should be brought to class. All assessment tasks must be successfully completed in order to pass the course.
    Assessment Detail
    Tutorial presentation  accompanied by written outline, due on assigned dates throughout the course, presenting on a case study of the student’s choice.

    Mid-course essay on assigned question/topic, with annotated bibliography due in advance at date to be announced.

    Student journal, at least one entry per topic with details to be provided about topics/themes, with at least 5 but no more than 8 entries.

    Final essay  with annotated bibliography and choice of research question due in advance at date to be announced.
    Submission
    All assignments will be submitted online through MyUni. For essays and tutorial presentation
    write-ups, this is a two-step process: the assignment first needs to be electronically submitted for
    marking through the course folder in MyUni by following the instructions to upload a Word
    Document. It then needs to be submitted separately to Turnitin, which is also done through the MyUni site. A dedicated folder will be established on MyUni for submission of journal entries.

    Note that all assignments submitted through MyUni must be converted to PDF prior to submission. For assistance in converting your assignment file to PDF please see http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/tutorials/content/ICC_Printed_Assignment_PDF_creation.html

    For more assistance on submitting your PDF assignment file to MyUni please telephone the Service Desk on 831 33000, 8am - 6pm, Monday to Friday or email servicedesk@adelaide.edu.au.

    EXTENSIONS
    Students wishing to apply for an extension need to submit the relevant form available at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/mod_arrange.html  to the school office at least 5 days prior to the due date for the assignment.

    Exceptions to the Policy
    If one of the following criteria is met, an informal extension can be organised with the course coordinator or tutor:
    · small extension – 2 days or less;
    · assessment item is worth 20% or less;
    · student is registered with the Disability Office (need to attach a Disability Access Plan – DAP).
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines

    This section contains links to relevant assessment-related policies and guidelines - all university policies.

    The School of History and Politics is committed to upholding the  University's Policy on Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S). All  staff and students have a legal responsibility to act in the interests  of themselves and others with respect to OH&S. For information on the School's contingency plan and emergency procedures, please see the OH&S section on the school website:

    http://www.hss.adelaide.edu.au/historypolitics/ohs
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.