HIST 5008EX - Food Choices and Food Ethics

External - Semester 1 - 2015

Our choices as to what and how we eat depend in part on what we prefer as well as on the perceived nutritional and medicinal values of the foodstuffs available. Most importantly, our food choices are shaped consciously and unconsciously by the values assigned to various types of foods within our culture. This course explores the history of the theories and beliefs that have influenced food choices in particular cultures at different periods of time, and how these theories and beliefs have been shaped by broader philosophies of the 'good life' in these societies, from ancient times to the present-day. The course begins with an overview of the history of concepts relating to values and food choice, and examines the history and evolution of a series of individual food choices and their rationales. It looks at food avoidance and taboos with religious and secular bases within their cultural and historical contexts. Philosophies which are aimed in part at the good of those around us are explored, as well as food choices and their environmental impacts. The course concludes with a discussion of food security both in the developed and developing world, and the responsibilities associated with ensuring global food security.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 5008EX
    Course Food Choices and Food Ethics
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s External
    Units 6
    Contact Online (2 March to 5 June)
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description Our choices as to what and how we eat depend in part on what we prefer as well as on the perceived nutritional and medicinal values of the foodstuffs available. Most importantly, our food choices are shaped consciously and unconsciously by the values assigned to various types of foods within our culture. This course explores the history of the theories and beliefs that have influenced food choices in particular cultures at different periods of time, and how these theories and beliefs have been shaped by broader philosophies of the 'good life' in these societies, from ancient times to the present-day. The course begins with an overview of the history of concepts relating to values and food choice, and examines the history and evolution of a series of individual food choices and their rationales. It looks at food avoidance and taboos with religious and secular bases within their cultural and historical contexts. Philosophies which are aimed in part at the good of those around us are explored, as well as food choices and their environmental impacts. The course concludes with a discussion of food security both in the developed and developing world, and the responsibilities associated with ensuring global food security.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Laura Prosperi

    Dr Laura Prosperi, Course Coordinator
    School of History and Politics
    508 Napier Building
    laura.prosperi@adelaide.adu.au
    Phone: 8313 0054

    A/Prof Rachel A. Ankeny, Program Coordinator
    School of History & Politics
    311 Napier Building
    rachel.ankeny@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Not applicable.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate:
    1 Familiarity with the history and evolution of views on food choice and ethics.
    2 Understanding of and ability to apply the appropriate methodologies for research into questions and issues relating to food choice and ethics.
    3 Appreciation of a variety of religious and secular views on ethical issues relating to food and drink.
    4 Understanding of arguments associated with various positions on ethical issues relating to food and drink, including debates relating to food security and globalization.
    5 Ability to evaluate and critically analyse current debates about food choice and ethics in a verbal presentation.
    6 The written and research skills required to develop and present an extended argument on a central issue relating to food choice and ethics within a broader sociohistorical context.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1 - 6
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1 - 2, 5 - 6
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 5 - 6
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2, 6
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1 - 6
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1, 3 - 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Required readings will be made available in electronic form via the course’s MyUni site. Lectures
    will be available in online form along with online tutorial sessions.
    Recommended Resources
    A list of recommended resources will be made available via the course’s MyUni site including links to online versions of resources where available and to the library’s resource guide for food studies. Additional materials including essay writing and reference guides will be made available via MyUni, and Turnitin will be utilized via MyUni. Students have access to computing suites as well as IT support via the University, and are provided with a printing quota each semester. Other resources will be provided via the course MyUni site.
    Online Learning
    A course website will be available via MyUni at https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/webapps/login/ once the course begins, and all students must make access to this site to complete the course. Portfolio entries must be posted regularly via this site, and all assessment tasks will be submitted via MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Online lectures, tutorials and assessment tasks are the main modes of learning supplemented by structured learning activities which support building the knowledge and skills which are the main foci of the course.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements, and are based on approximations of average workload per week of the intensive term.  During some parts of the term, workload may be heavy or lighter.

    Virtual classroom lectures: 1 hour per week
    Tutorials: 2 hours per week
    Structured learning activities: 3 hours

    The workload for this unit will include:
    Listening/Reading: 4 hours per week
    Researching and completing assignments: 2 hours/week

    Please note that 6-unit courses in HUMSS are designed on the assumption that all learning and assessment activities (including reading, on-line viewing, preparatory work, research and writing of assignments etc.) will require approximately 312 hours.


    Learning Activities Summary
    Learning activities will be associated with the following key themes, and will utilize theoretical literature as well as a series of case studies examining historic and contemporary examples relating to food choice and food ethics.

    Review of research methodologies and sources relating to food ethics/choice.

    Overview of the history of concepts relating to values and food choice, with particular attention to the concepts of omnivorousness and how foods come to be considered as ‘edible’.

    History and evolution of various types of individual food choices and their rationales, including vegetarianism, veganism, and locovorism.

    Food avoidance and taboos with religious and secular bases within their cultural and historical contexts.

    Food philosophies associated with the good of the broader community (such as the farmers’ market movement, community-supported agriculture, and fair trade).

    The environmental impacts of food choices.

    The science and ethics of organics and genetically-modified foods The impending crisis of food security locally and globally in the face of globalization.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    • Final essay
    • Mid-course essay
    • Tutorial presentation accompanied by written outline, due on assigned individual dates during the semester
    • Student portfolio, at least one entry per topic/ every two weeks

    All assessment tasks are formative, and all contribute to learning objectives 1-6. This course is not exempt from any requirement of the Assessment for Coursework Programs policy
    Assessment Related Requirements
    All assessment tasks must be successfully completed in order to pass the course.
    Assessment Detail
    • Final essay
    • Mid-course essay
    • Tutorial presentation accompanied by written outline, due on assigned individual dates during the semester
    • Student portfolio, at least one entry per topic/ every two weeks
    All assessment tasks are formative, and all contribute to learning objectives 1-6. This course is not exempt from any requirement of the Assessment for Coursework Programs policy
    Submission
    All assignments will be submitted online through MyUni. For essays and tutorial presentation
    write-ups, the assignment must be submitted via Turnitin on the MyUni site. A dedicated folder will be established on MyUni for submission of portfolio entries.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines

    This section contains links to relevant assessment-related policies and guidelines - all university policies.

    The School of History and Politics is committed to upholding the  University's Policy on Occupational
    Health & Safety (OH&S). All staff and students have a legal responsibility to act in the interests  of themselves and others with respect to OH&S. For information on the School's contingency plan and
    emergency procedures, please see the OH&S section on the school website:

    http://www.hss.adelaide.edu.au/historypolitics/ohs



  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.