DENT 2005AHO - Dental Science and Practice II Part 1

Teaching Hospitals - Semester 1 - 2018

This stream has a patient care focus and builds on the knowledge acquired in first year. The aim is to develop an understanding of the changes that occur to the oral cavity when an imbalance develops in the oral ecosystem. The emphasis will be to maintain a healthy balance through prevention and minimal restoration where necessary. By working through a series of interactive learning activities, students will develop and integrate knowledge relating to evidence-based patient care including clinical skills and professional behaviours. These integrated learning activities will be supported by class meetings, laboratory, tutorial and clinical sessions. Learning will also be supported by independent study and discussion of findings in class. Students will work in a collaborative environment to learn to critically evaluate themselves, and plan and implement strategies for improvement. The stream emphasises the scientific basis of dentistry by integrating knowledge of the structure and function of the body, especially of the head and neck region, and also aspects of microbiology, immunology and pathology, with an emphasis on developing the skills to examine, assess risk and systematically manage healthy patients with minor oral conditions. There is a strong emphasis on the acquisition of manual dexterity skills relating to operative dentistry while building on knowledge relating to a preventive approach to oral health. Students will further their experience in behavioural science by examining and managing patients.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code DENT 2005AHO
    Course Dental Science and Practice II Part 1
    Coordinating Unit Dental
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Teaching Hospitals
    Contact Up to 28 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Prerequisites DENT 1005AHO/BHO
    Restrictions Available to BDS students only
    Course Description This stream has a patient care focus and builds on the knowledge acquired in first year. The aim is to develop an understanding of the changes that occur to the oral cavity when an imbalance develops in the oral ecosystem. The emphasis will be to maintain a healthy balance through prevention and minimal restoration where necessary.

    By working through a series of interactive learning activities, students will develop and integrate knowledge relating to evidence-based patient care including clinical skills and professional behaviours. These integrated learning activities will be supported by class meetings, laboratory, tutorial and clinical sessions. Learning will also be supported by independent study and discussion of findings in class. Students will work in a collaborative environment to learn to critically evaluate themselves, and plan and implement strategies for improvement. The stream emphasises the scientific basis of dentistry by integrating knowledge of the structure and function of the body, especially of the head and neck region, and also aspects of microbiology, immunology and pathology, with an emphasis on developing the skills to examine, assess risk and systematically manage healthy patients with minor oral conditions.
    There is a strong emphasis on the acquisition of manual dexterity skills relating to operative dentistry while building on knowledge relating to a preventive approach to oral health. Students will further their experience in behavioural science by examining and managing patients.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Toby Hughes


    Course Coordinator Contact Details

    Name Phone Email Location
    A/Prof John Kaidonis +61 8313 3297 john.kaidonis@adelaide.edu.au Level 10 Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences Building
    Dr Robin Yong +61 8313 6788 robin.yong@adelaide.edu.au as above
    Dr Poppy Anastassiadis    +61 8313 2911 poppy.anastassiadis@adelaide.edu.a as above
    A/Prof Dimitra Lekkas +61 8313 4229 dimitra.lekkas@adelaide.edu.au as above
    A/Prof Toby Hughes +61 8313 3295 toby.hughes@adelaide.edu.au as above






    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

     

    Professional Behaviours

    1.    complies with Uni and SADS policies by displaying appropriate professional and ethical behaviour through respecting colleagues and patients, maintaining patient confidentiality and obtaining informed consent in all learning environments

     

    2.    complies with Australian Dental Board requirements for student registration and professional conduct in all learning environments

     

    3.    applies an evidence-based approach to inform decisions at all levels of interaction with healthy adult patients by applying the hierarchy of evidence and basic statistical concepts when critically evaluating relevant literature

     

    4.    applies an evidence-based approach by critically evaluating studies of diagnostic tests, disease frequency and risk, prevention and treatment, and applying principles of risk assessment, treatment evaluation and decision making in clinical dental practice

     

    5.    describes the complimentary functions and roles of all involved in patient care eg, dental assistant, dental therapist and dental hygienist

     

    6.    critically evaluates own performance, seeking feedback and implementing appropriate strategies for improvement

     

    7.    describes different approaches to respond to common occupational stressors and seeks assistance in developing effective management strategies for self and patients

     

    8.    identifies limits of clinical skills and recommends referral where appropriate

     

    9.    establishes a safe working environment in laboratory and clinical settings and identify and rectify unsafe practices

     

    10.  demonstrates a patient centred approach by reviewing their patient’s reason for visit, information and other needs and context  

     

    11.  produces and maintains an accurate, complete and confidential record of the care of medically healthy adult patients

     

    12.  demonstrates an understanding of patients’ problem(s), and agreed management that emphasises prevention and health promotion and supports an ongoing patient dentist relationship

     

    13.  obtains informed consent for relevant investigations and treatments related to the preventive management of gingivitis, non-cavitated carious lesions and, toothwear as well as the management of cavitated lesions in medically healthy adults

     

    14.  describes the distribution of oral health and

    disease/illness/disability at a population level in Australia and relates this to contributory factors and their importance

    Interpersonal Skills

    15.  communicates effectively to competently manage the oral care of healthy adult patients of diverse backgrounds through active listening, clarity in explanations and ability to seek feedback

     

    16.  works and communicates effectively and respectfully with other members of the oral health care team in simulated and clinical settings

     

    17.  effectively uses stress management strategies for self

     

    18.  communicates effectively to support patients to understand their oral health care needs

     

    19.  communicates effectively to assist management of pain and stress in patients

     

    20.  prepares patient by explaining the steps of their treatment plan and at each appointment provides an accurate explanation of the procedures, including what the patient should expect to experience (informing the patient of what to expect)

    Clinical Examination,

    Diagnostic and Management Skills

    21.  discusses the factors eg, behavioural and social, that contribute to the maintenance of a balance within the oral ecosystem, including the normal oral microflora and their relation to the host under normal healthy conditions, and can apply this to the management of healthy adult patients

     

    22. describes characteristics/ factors that are associated with good general and oral health at a population level

     

    23. applies your integrated knowledge of the structure and function of selected body systems and key functions of a healthy body such as nutrient supply and waste removal, respiration, transport and movement, as a basis for analysis of patients' oral health

     

    24.  safely and accurately takes a medical, dental and social history, examines extraoral, intraoral soft, periodontal and hard tissues, performs a simple occlusal analysis including the collection and interpretation of additional clinical information, appropriately recognises the range of normality and records normal findings and clinical signs of common oral diseases for selected healthy adult patients

     

    25.  explains the principles of identification of risk factors in relation to the development of common oral diseases in selected healthy adult patients

     

     

    26.  applies understanding of  the oral ecosystem, patient education, behaviour change and remineralisation materials to develop preventive recommendations to restore and maintain oral health for selected healthy adult patients

     

    27.  applies knowledge of how various factors contribute to the imbalance in the oral ecosystem, that increase the risk of disease in healthy adults and relates these to the different levels of effective health promotion and prevention for patients and populations

     

    28.  interprets histories and examinations and selects appropriate further investigations to formulate diagnoses of common oral diseases/conditions eg, gingivitis, caries and toothwear, for selected medically healthy adult patients

     

    29.  applies knowledge of  the aetiology and pathogenesis of gingivitis, including microbiology and histopathology, and relates these to clinical examination results, diagnosis and management for healthy adult patients

     

    30.  applies knowledge of the aetiology and pathogenesis of caries, including microbiology and histopathology, and relates these to clinical examination results, diagnosis and management following principles of minimal intervention for healthy adult patients

     

    31.  able to identify toothwear during a clinical examination and recognise the need for management if required, following principles of minimal intervention for healthy adult patients

    Practical/

    Technical Skills

    32.  discusses and implements appropriate infection control and occupational health and safety procedures required when working within a clinical environment and laboratory environment

     

    33.  maintains patient comfort and privacy throughout all aspects of patient care

     

    34.  safely and effectively manipulates dental instruments (dental mirror, explorer, periodontal probe, and the slow speed handpiece) whilst working on a patient colleague

     

    35.  explains to patients the rationale and risks associated with dental radiographic procedures: accurately exposes, processes, critiques and interprets bitewing and periapical radiographs, and uses the results to inform patients and develop their management plans

     

    36.  applies knowledge of risks associated with dental radiographs to safely and accurately take bitewing and periapical radiographs in simulated settings; examines and critiques bitewing and periapical radiographs and recognises the appearance of normal imaged structures and associated basic pathology (eg., restorations, caries, calculus) in bitewing, periapical and panoramic radiographs

     

     

    37.  safely and effectively explains and performs simple preventive treatments, including remineralisation techniques eg, professional or home fluorides, fissure sealants (under rubber dam), oral hygiene instructions, dietary advice in simulated and/or clinical situations 

     

    38.  describes the composition, setting reactions and technical handling procedures for preventive materials used to restore and maintain balance in the oral ecosystem, including fluorides, remineralising agents, fissure sealants and chemical plaque control

     

    39.  applies knowledge of the composition, setting reactions and technical handling procedures of dental materials in the selection and manipulation of appropriate materials in the management of caries in simulated settings, including remineralising agents, amalgam, composite resin, glass ionomer cements, liners/bases and local anaesthetics

     

    40.  in accordance with Minimal Intervention (MI) principles, explains the principles of tooth conservation and relates these to the rationale for selection of different procedures required for the management of dental caries, from minimal to large lesions

     

    41.  develops the manual dexterity skills required to follow basic operative procedures in the laboratory

     

    42.  satisfactorily restores plastic or natural teeth with adhesive and amalgam restorations in simulated settings

     

    43.  safely and effectively manipulates dental instruments (dental mirror, explorer, periodontal probe, periodontal scalers and curettes and handpiece) whilst working in the laboratory or on a patient in the clinic

     

    44.  safely and effectively performs supragingival and subgingival scaling & cleaning, management of dentine hypersensitivity, and can select an apply appropriately remineralisation techniques as part of preventive management plans for colleagues and medically healthy adult patients

     

    45.  safely and effectively performs common pain control procedures on colleagues

     

    46.  applies integrated knowledge of the structure and function of selected body systems and key functions of a healthy body such as immunity and endocrine control, as a basis for analysis of patients' oral health

     

    47.  applies knowledge of the topographical anatomy of the head and neck region, including the oral cavity and provides local anaesthesia for patients

     

    48.  applies knowledge of microbiology, pathology and immunology in the management of patients  

     

    49.  selects appropriate tests to identify specific risk factors leading to an imbalance in the oral ecosystem and uses these results to devise tailored preventive management plans in relation to common oral diseases in medically healthy adult patients

     

    50.  is able to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the physiological principles underlying cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR), can recognise the signs and symptoms of associated with emergency situations in the clinic an collapse of a patient, and can perform the recommended emergency CPR procedures.

     

    51.  able to write an appropriate referral letter to a dentist or another health professional

     

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1 to 50
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    3,4, 21 to 31
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    10, 15-18
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1 to 50
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    10,11,12,13,15
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    6,7,8,17
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    Dental Science and Practice I & II Resources (2013). School of Dentistry, University of Adelaide (on MyUni)

    Fuss J, Ghabriel M & Townsend G (2012) Cranial Nerves. School of Dentistry, University of Adelaide.

    Townsend G (2017) Local Anaesthesia in Dentistry. School of Dentistry, University of Adelaide (on MyUni)

    Townsend G (2013) Learning anatomy applied to dentistry: an enjoyable journey. School of Dentistry, University of Adelaide

    Richards LC (2012) Biology of Occlusion. School of Dentistry, University of Adelaide (on MyUni)

    Townsend G, Innes P, Fuss J & Ghabriel M (2013) Anatomy for Dental Students Learning Laboratories and MCQs. School of Dentistry, University of Adelaide


    Further information in Second yr handbook/MyUni
    Recommended Resources

    Updated information is available in BDS 2 Handbook on MyUni.

    Baker EW (ed), Schuenke M, Schulte E, Schumacher U (2010) Head and neck anatomy for dental medicine. Thieme Medical Publishers Inc. New York

    Campbell NA, Reece JB and Meyers N (2009) Biology. 8th edition, Pearson Education Australia

    Ramseier C, Suvan J (2010) Health Behaviour change in the dental practice, Wiley-Blackwell, Ames, Iowa Silverman J, Kurtz S, Draper J (2005) Skills for communicating with Patients 2nd edn., Radcliffe Publishing, Oxford

    Silverman J, Kurtz S, Draper J (2005). Skills for Communicating with Patients 2nd edn. Radcliffe Publishing, Oxford, UK.

    Ten Cate AR and Nanci A (2008) Ten Cate’s oral histology: development, structure and function. 7th ed. Mosby Elsevier

    Whaites E and Drage N (2007) Essentials of Dental Radiography and Radiology, 4th Edition. Edinburgh ; Sydney : Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier. (There is now a 5th edition, 2013 which I bought as an eBook but it’s not in the BSL).

    Highly recommended DVDs
    Acland’s DVD Atlas of Human Anatomy. The Head and Neck, Parts 1&2. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

    Reference Books
    Champe, P..M. and Harvey, R.A. (1994) Lippincott’s illustrated reviews: Biochemistry. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Lippincott Co.

    Humphris G, Ling M (2000) Behavioural Sciences for Dentistry. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh Lloyd M, Bor R (2004) Communication Skills for Medicine 2nd edition, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh

    Kidd EAM (2005) Essentials of Dental Caries: The Disease and its management. 3rd edition Oxford, New York, Oxford University Press

    Kidd and Smith (2003) Pickard’s Manual of Operative Dentistry.8thedition Oxford Medical Publications

    Mount GJ and Hume WR (2005).Preservation and Restoration of Tooth Structure.2nd Edition. Knowledge Books and Software

    A 3rd Edition of Preservation and Restoration of Tooth Structure is likely to be available in the middle of 2014. Exact details on release date and the cost of this text book are not able to be confirmed at this stage.

    Powers JM and Sakaguchi RL (2006) Craig’s Restorative Dental Materials. 12th ed. Mosby Elsevier

    Tortora GJ, Principles of anatomy and physiology. 10th or 11th ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

    Yip K and Smales R (2012). A clinical guide to oral diagnosis and treatment planning. London: British Dental Association

    Yip K, Smales RJ, Kaidonis (2006). Tooth Erosion: Prevention and Treatment. Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers Ltd, New Delhi
    Online Learning

    Acland's Video Atlas of Human Anatomy
    http://proxy.library.adelaide.edu.au/login?url=http://aclandanatomy.com/

    Microbiology
    http://pathmicro.med.sc.edu/book/bact-sta.htm

    http://www.textbookofbacteriology.net/kt_toc.html

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK7627/

    Radiology
    This online resources from the US may also be helpful for 2nd semester (http://www.lsusd.lsuhsc.edu/DentalRadiographicDiagnosis.html)
    Dental Radiographic Diagnosis by Dr. Kavas H. Thunthy LSU Health New Orleans School of Dentistry


    Updated information is available in BDS 2 Handbook on MyUni.


    Communications about the course will be via the Announcements section on MyUni and/or by email. Please read the Announcements section and your email regularly to keep up to date.
    Additional course-related material, such as the detailed lecture and tutorial schedule, assessment schedules plus topics for oral presentation will be available through MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    A variety of learning modes will be used in this stream including:

    •    a number of dentally-related situations/experiences focussing particularly on the stated learning outcomes (Integrated Learning Activities - ILAs)
    •    Class Meetings
    •    Clinic sessions
    •    Simulated Clinic sessions
    •    Learning Laboratories
    •    Clinical Communication Tutorials with Volunteer Patients
    •    Tutorials & library research and assignments
    •    Formative quizzes


    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    To successfully complete courses, students will need to allocate an appropriate time commitment to their study.  In addition to the formal contact the time required for each course [eg, ILAs, class meetings, tutorials, practicals, clinics] students will need to allocate non-contact time.  Non-contact time will be required for a range of activities which may include, but are not limited to, assessment tasks, reading, researching, note-taking, preparing for clinic/simulated clinic sessions, revision, and writing, consultation with staff and informal discussions with other students.

    While the relative proportion of contact and non-contact time may vary from course to course, as a guide, a full-time student would expect to spend, on average, a total of 48 hrs/wk on their studies during teaching periods to achieve a satisfactory level of performance. The teaching periods for BDS 2 are:

    •    19 weeks for Semester 1 (ie week 1 to the end of the examination period); and
    •    17 weeks for semester 2 (ie week 1 to the end of the examination period).

    The workload for undergraduate/postgraduate programs is 24 units per year (full-time).    

    Total workload (hrs/week) 48

    Contact hours (hrs/week) up to 28:
    Comprising ILAs, Class Meetings, LearningLaboratories, Simulated Clinic sessions, Clinic sessions, Clinical Communication Tutorials with Volunteer Patients, Tutorials, Radiography simulation sessions, Titanium training sessions

    Non-Contact hours (hrs/week) up to 20:
    Comprising Group and Individual Learning andPreparation for class meetings, learning laboratories, simulated clinic sessions, clinical communication tutorials with volunteer patients tutorials, clinics and assignments.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Below is a list of DSP 2 topics.
    Refer to MyUni for the full program of classes/learning activities

    Social context of dentistry
    Social determinants of indigenous health
    Evidence-based Dentistry
    Genetics
    Physiology – Endocrine system
    Diabetes
    Collapsing patient
    Tooth development – process, timing and sequence of tooth development/tooth emergence
    Tooth development – genetic and environmental causes of enamel defects; management
    Embryology of the head, face and oral cavity including developmental disturbances
    Oral mucosa, salivary glands and masticatory system including the TMJ
    Immunology
    Oral Immunology
    Oral Pathology
    Head and neck anatomy
    Neuroanatomy
    Rheumatic heart disease/rheumatic fever
    Clinical Communication Skills
    Minimal Intervention Dentistry
    Preventive dentistry
    Patient centred comprehensive examination and management plannning
    Cariology
    Dental materials
    Saliva and role in oral health
    Radiography and radiology (periapical, occlusal, panoramic)
    Periodontology – chronic gingivitis and introduction to periodontitis
    Anxiety and management of acute pain
    Dental local anaesthesia and pain control
    CPR
    Specific Course Requirements
    There are numerous Clinical Placement requirements that are mandated. Students are required to be up to date with all clinical placement requirements.
    Refer to information at following location:


    Equipment Required


    Dissection kit:
    This kit is required for learning laboratories in Anatomy in semester 2. Details will be provided during semester 1.

    Extracted natural teeth:
    You will need to have your natural tooth manikins that were constructed in first year during semester 2 for second year operative technique sessions. Please ensure you keep the manikins moist in water. Please remove your magnets from the models prior to storage to avoid rust. Do not let the teeth dry out as they will become brittle and unusable.

    Laboratory coat:
    You need to wear a coat in all learning laboratories in Dental Science and Practice II. You are required to wear this during your laboratory sessions, to conform with HW&S regulations.

    Clinic coat:
    You need to wear a clean and ironed clinic coat during clinic in Dental Science and Practice II.

    Protective glasses:
    You are required to wear protective glasses during your learning laboratories and in the clinic sessions, that conform with Australian HW&S regulations. The eyewear should be close fitting and not have gaps at the side of the eyes or above the brow. Students who wear prescription glasses need to purchase an overshield.

    Dental Loupes:
    Dental loupes play a vital role in the delivery of a high standard of dental care by improving vision for greater accuracy in diagnoses and in providing greater precision in operative dental procedures in general and specialist areas of dentistry. Correctly fitted dental loupes allow improved posture with less eye strain facilitating healthy musculo-skeletal functioning. It is highly recommended that students purchase dental loupes during second year of the BDS program. Dental loupes must conform to the Australian Standards in terms of HW&S.

    Instrument Kit:
    The dental instruments purchased for Dental Science and Practice I are also required for use in 2nd, 3rd and 4thyr for operative technique exercises. 

    Plastic tooth Models:
    Plastic teeth, gums and bases are required. During 2nd yr additional plastic teeth will also be required for additional procedures. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they have adequate teeth prior to all operative technique laboratory sessions (as outlined in the simulated clinic program).

    Practice Blocks and Wax Carving Teeth:
    Practice blocks and wax carving teeth will be required as outlined in the simulation clinic program and advised by coordinator.
    Small Group Discovery Experience

    Student learning from the SGDE activities involves the following processes as part of participating in the ILAs:
    • learning the systematic scientific approach to patient investigation, ie, consistent with students current and future professional practice;
    • identifying, critiquing and referencing relevant evidence derived from the literature and interactions with School researchers;
    • researching answers to questions they identify using this evidence related to clinical, population health, behavioural and biodental sciences.

    As a result of their research, students develop, structure and apply their knowledge so they can understand their patient’s situation and recommend appropriate care.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Clinical and simulated clinical performance Summative 30% of whole years’ work. 1-14; 15-20; 21-31; 32-39; 43-51
     Semester 1 and 2 written examination Summative 70% of the whole years’ work. All learning outcomes
    ILA participation;  Test of Understanding EBD; Social Context of Dentistry Assignment; Participation in Radiography and Tianium training rosters; Participation in Biology of occlusion learning lab sessions; NGP Must achieve a pass standard All learning outcomes
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Assessment details are found in the BDS 2 Handbook (on MyUni)


    Attendance at all classes eg clinic, sim clinic, ILA sessions, tutorials/workshops student learner activities, subrosters (ie, radiography, Common Ground, private practice visits) are compulsory.

    All students in the BDS program are required to notify the School of absences. Students are reminded that the BDS programme is a professional degree, requiring the highest standards of professional behavior. Notification of any absence is also good professional conduct. International students need to be compliant and attend classes as a requirement of the visa obligations and responsibilities under the Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS) Act 2000.

    If you are unable to attend your scheduled session the following 3-step protocol must be followed:

    1. Contact the clinic asap to inform them of your absence.

    2. Email the BDS Yr level/clinic/sim clinic coordinator and inform them of your absence ASAP

    3. Complete and lodge a “Clinic Non-Attendance” form. This step is mandatory. This form is located in SONIA.

    Further information is on MyUni.
    Assessment Detail
    Formative Assessment (Feedback)
    A range of formative assessment activities will be provided in several sessions in each semester. These have been designed to help you learn key concepts in DSP II as well as give you feedback on your progress and to gain experience in the question formats used in DSP II. These activities will be in the form of questions in class meetings, learning laboratories, tutorials and online.  In addition during each session in the simulation clinic and clinic, students are required to reflect on their performance, in verbal and written format, using criteria as per the DSP 2 Assessment Criteria and Standards. Tutors then provide written feedback in the students’ self-assessment booklet. There are also a range of other activities where students are provided formative feedback – refer to Section 5.2. 


    Summative Assessment
    This table provides a summary of the summative assessment tasks  
    Semester 1 Semester 2
    Clinic performance
    Test of Understanding EBD;
    Social context of Dentistry assignment.
    ILA small group tutorial performance
    Clinic performance
    Simulated clinic session performance
    ILA small group tutorial performance
    Volunteer patient program participation
    End of Semester 1 End of Semester 2
    2 X 2 Hour Written Examinations 2 X 2 Hour Written Examinations (Whole Year)
    Progressive Integrated Assessment (PIA)
    Submission
    Details on submission processes/requirements will be provided in the documentation for any work that is to be submitted. These will be posted on MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    NOG (No Grade Associated)
    Grade Description
    CN Continuing

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    The School follows the University’s SELT policy regarding the use of SELTs to evaluate its programmes, courses and teachers. The results are reviewed with by Year and Course Coordinators and actions taken as appropriate. A summary of changes that have been made are circulated to staff and students after the review process.

    The year co-ordinators will meet with students on a regular basis to discuss the delivery of the course, content, clinical and other matters.

    Student representative across the BDS program also meet periodically with the Head of School.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.