NURSING 7135 - Intensive Care I

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2015

This course will provide foundation knowledge and skills which are fundamental for the development of advanced intensive care nursing practice. Course content will focus on the delivery of patient-centred care which considers the psychological, psychosocial and physiological impact of the critical care environment. Consideration will also be made to the needs of specialised populations in the critical care environment. Content will be presented with a systems approach focussing on respiratory and cardiovascular patient management considering the advanced physiology, pathophysiology, assessment, diagnostics and therapeutics of care. Evidence-based practice will be integral to course delivery. Material will be delivered utilising a variety of methods including lectures, tutorials, practical sessions, case studies and discussions to promote critical thought and ensure theory and practice are integrated.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code NURSING 7135
    Course Intensive Care I
    Coordinating Unit School of Nursing
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Assumed Knowledge Basic anatomy and physiology
    Course Description This course will provide foundation knowledge and skills which are fundamental for the development of advanced intensive care nursing practice. Course content will focus on the delivery of patient-centred care which considers the psychological, psychosocial and physiological impact of the critical care environment. Consideration will also be made to the needs of specialised populations in the critical care environment.
    Content will be presented with a systems approach focussing on respiratory and cardiovascular patient management considering the advanced physiology, pathophysiology, assessment, diagnostics and therapeutics of care. Evidence-based practice will be integral to course delivery. Material will be delivered utilising a variety of methods including lectures, tutorials, practical sessions, case studies and discussions to promote critical thought and ensure theory and practice are integrated.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mrs Sindy Millington

    Course Coordinator: Sindy Millington
    Phone: +61 8 8222 4387
    Email: sindy.millington@adelaide.edu.au

    Student Liason Officer:
    Phone: +61 8 8313 3596
    Email: nursing.studentliaison@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Demonstrate the provision of patient focussed integrated holistic care of the critically ill patient.
    2 Appraise the pathophysiology of disease processes that can result in critical illness in a clinical based scenario.
    3 Formulate an analysis of monitoring and assessment of critically ill patients in intensive care in a clinical based scenario
    4 Integrate aspects of nursing theory and knowledge to actual clinical practice
    5 Evaluate the use of analytical enquiry and critical reflection into nursing practice, through contemporary issues in intensive care nursing.
    6 Integrates current evidence based guidelines, consensus statements, and attitudes astutely to ensure competent clinical practice in clinical based scenario.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 3-5
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 3-5
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 3-5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 4
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 3-6
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 5
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Texts
    The prescribed texts are integral to the course. Students are required to select one of the following critical care nursing texts:

    Bersten, A & Soni, N (eds) 2009, Oh’s intensive care manual, 6th edn, Butterworth Heinemann Elsevier, Philadelphia.
    or
    Elliot, D, Aitken, L & Chaboyer, W (eds) 2011, ACCCN’s critical care nursing, Mosby Elsevier, Sydney.
    or
    Urden, L, Stacy, K & Lough, M 2010, Critical care nursing, diagnosis and management, 6th edn, Mosby Elsevier, St Louis.
    and
    Wesley K 2011 Huszar’s Basic dysrhythmias and acute coronary Syndromes: Interpretation and Management 4th edn, Mosby Elsevier, St Louis

    Each week a chapter (or part thereof - please take note of page numbers) will be identified as essential preparatory reading.

    Reader
    The readings for this course are available electronically via MyUni.
    Please note: it is your responsibility to organise printing should you prefer a hard copy of the reader.
    Recommended Resources
    Texts
    Pharmacology
    Bryant, B & Knights, K 2007, Pharmacology for Health Professionals, 2nd edn Mosby Elsevier, Sydney
    or
    Bullock, S & Manias E & Galbraith A 2011, Fundamentals of Pharmacology 6th edn, Pearson Education Australia, Frenchs Forest

    Ventilation
    Pilbeam, S.P & Cairo, J.M 2006, Mechanical Ventilation; Physiological and Clinical Applications, 4th edn, Mosby Elsevier, St Louis
    or
    Pierce, LNB 2007, Management of the Mechanically Ventilated Patient, 2nd edn, Saunders Elsevier, St Louis.

    Anatomy and Physiology
    Saladin, K.S 2010, Anatomy & Physiology, The unity of form and function 5th edn, McGraw Hill, Boston.
    or
    Martini F. H 2006, Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology 7th edn, Pearson, San Francisco.

    Haemodynamic monitoring
    Darovic, G 2002, Haemodynamic monitoring, invasive and non-invasive clinical application, 3rd edn, WB Saunders Co, Philadelphia
    or 
    Darovic GO 2004 Handbook of hemodynamic monitoring 2nd edn, Saunders, St Louis.

    Note: You are not required to buy recommended texts. However, they provide valuable supplementary reading on various aspects of the material covered within this course

    E-books
    As a student at the University of Adelaide you also have free access to a large variety of quality electronic textbooks. These can be accessed online through the library website by entering the E-Journals A-Z link and selecting-books only.
    Online Learning
    MyUni
    All students enrolled in a postgraduate coursework nursing program have access to the School of Nursing – Postgraduate Coursework Student Centre on MyUni. If you would like the opportunity to network with other students, you can use the Communication features in the site. This site will also feature information about the latest news and events at the School of Nursing.

    Unified
    http://unified.adelaide.edu.au/
    UNIFIED is your one-stop shop for email, calendar, MyUni and Access Adelaide. It even allows you to search the Library.
    UNIFIED is available to all active students; with a single login you can access your student systems and personal information through a central website. Login with your Student ID ("a1234567") and Password.

    For more information, including easy to follow instructions visit https://unified.adelaide.edu.au/web/mycampus/home.

    Library Resources
    Help for Nursing Students
    The University of Adelaide Library has a website to help nursing students use the library and its resource (www.library.adelaide.edu.au/guide/med/nursing).

    Remote student library service
    The University of Adelaide Library provides a document delivery and loans service to non-metropolitan students who do not visit a University of Adelaide campus to attend classes (www.adelaide.edu.au/library/docdel/external.html).
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course employs on campus delivery of material by a variety of teaching methods to promote learning. A mix of lectures including guest speakers, tutorials, practical skill demonstration and case study review will be incorporated into the sessions. Students will be challenged to develop and demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving skills.

    Student participation and discussion will be expected in all sessions.

    Lectures
    Course lectures are on Wednesdays 8.30am to 1pm on the University of Adelaide or Royal Adelaide Hospital Campus, North Terrace. Lecture locations will be made available on the MyUni website.

    Reading
    There are several recommended texts for this course and a reading list has been compiled and made available on MyUni. For each lecture, readings have been carefully chosen. All of these required and recommended readings have been selected to optimise your knowledge on the topic and so that they will continue to be of use to you after you graduate.

    Clinical Practice and Skill Acquisition
    This course supplements theoretical knowledge acquisition with field based learning. Students are required to complete clinical skills and work a minimum of 300 clinical hours in intensive care during this semester.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Lectures
    The student is expected to attend Course lectures every Wednesday morning from 8:30 am to 1 pm on the University of Adelaide or Royal Adelaide Hospital Campus, North Terrace. Lecture locations will be made available on the MyUni website. Student participation and discussion will be expected in all sessions.

    Readings

    A reading list has been compiled for this course and will be made available through MyUni. Lecture and readings have been carefully chosen. All of these are required and recommended readings have been selected to optimise your knowledge on the topic and so that they will continue to be of use after you graduate.

    Clinical Practice and Skills Acquisition
    This course supplements theoretical knowledge with field based learning. Students are required to complete clinical skills and work a minimum of 300 clinical skills in intensive care during this semester.
    Learning Activities Summary

    The course content will include the following:

    Care of the critically ill patient
    Assessment of critical illness – SOFA / APACHE II P
    sychosocial and cultural care
    Concerns of the critically ill
    Communication
    Comfort
    Pain Management and assessment
    Sedation
    Sedation management principles
    Assessment and prevention of delirium
    Nutrition
    Family’s experience

    Care of the patient with respiratory failure
    Respiratory Physiology
    Acute Respiratory failure

    Respiratory Monitoring, Assessment and Diagnostics
    CO2
    FEV
    VQ scans
    CXR revisited
    Acid base disorders
    ABG analysis

    Advanced Respiratory Management
    Oxygen therapy and humidification
    NIV
    Ventilation principles and management

    Common Respiratory Disorders Assessment and therapeutic Management
    Pneumonia
    Asthma
    COPD

    Complex Respiratory Disorders Assessment and Management (1st or Second Semester)
    ARDS
    Management of Pandemic Flu
    Advanced ventilation techniques
    Waveform analysis
    APRV / Bilevel
    ECMO

    Care of the patient with cardiac failure
    Cardiac Physiology and Electrophysiology
    Heart Failure

    Cardiac Monitoring and Assessment
    Arrhythmias
    Cardiac Pharmacology
    Antiarrhythmics
    Inotropes

    Atrioventricular blocks and Pacing

    12 lead ECG interpretation
    BBB
    Axis deviation
    Differentiation of VT/ SVT
    Non-cardiac ECG changes

    Care of the patient with ACS
    Assessment, diagnosis and therapeutic management
    UA
    STEMI
    NSTEMI

    Special populations in intensive care
    Paediatrics/ Paediatric Emergencies
    Obstetrics / Obstetric emergencies
    Gerontological alterations
    Mental Health




    This course considers the pathophysiology, assessment, monitoring and therapeutics associated with the broad discipline of intensive care nursing. Particular focus is given to the respiratory and cardiovascular management of this patient population. This course also addresses some of the clinical skills necessary for practice as a registered nurse in intensive care.

    Specialty Intensive Care
    Care of the critically ill patient
    This session will focus on building the foundation knowledge of specialty intensive care practice. The importance of providing patient focussed individualised care will be emphasised. The characteristics of the intensive care patient population locally, nationally and internationally will be explored. Students will be introduced to clinical instruments used to describe patient acuity and discuss the needs of specific patient populations including bariatric, gerontologic and paediatric patients in adult intensive care units.

    The fundamental aspects of nursing care will also be reviewed including:
    •    Nutrition in the critically ill patient
    •    Sedation and Delirium Management
    •    Psychosocial aspects of care
    •    Principles of Infection control
    •    Pain Management


    Care of the Patient with Respiratory Failure
    Advanced Respiratory Physiology
    The goals of this session are to provide strong foundation knowledge of advanced respiratory physiology.  This will enable the discussion of how these physical factors relate to critical illness and advanced respiratory therapeutics in future weeks. In particular there will be discussion of the control of respiration, the mechanics of breathing, factors influencing diffusion across the alveolar capillary membrane and the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The physical gas laws which influence gas delivery and gas exchange will be reviewed and focus will be given to the concepts of respiration versus ventilation.

    Acute Respiratory Failure
    The clinical features of acute respiratory failure, pathophysiology and the clinical manifestations of hypoxaemia and hypercarbia will be discussed in this session.

    Respiratory monitoring, assessment and diagnostics
    This topic will consider the monitoring, assessment and specialised nursing care of patients with actual or potential respiratory failure. The assessment and analysis of observations and monitored parameters will be investigated. Focus will be given to the use of spirometry, end tidal carbon dioxide monitoring, chest x-rays and the assessment of acid base disorders. This topic will introduce the principles of acid base regulation. Students will be introduced to a systematic approach to arterial blood gas analysis as a component of the session.

    Therapeutics: Advanced Respiratory Management
    This topic will consider therapeutics used for respiratory failure in critically ill patients. The principles of oxygen therapy will be considered, with focus given to the importance of humidification and consideration of issues pertaining to the appropriate use of oxygen therapy. Basic and advanced airway management will be presented from techniques such as positioning of the patient, to the use of advanced airway management techniques such as endotracheal intubation. Comparisons between differences in managing the adult and paediatric airway will also be reviewed.

    Therapeutics: principles of supported / assisted ventilation
    Supported and assisted ventilation will be examined from non-invasive supportive techniques such as Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) to therapies such as invasive, controlled ventilation. The issue of nursing management of patients receiving these therapies will be discussed, as well as physiological effects and possible complications.

    Common Respiratory Disorders: Assessment and therapeutic management
    Common causes of respiratory failure in critically ill patients such as pulmonary oedema, pneumonia, asthma, chronic obstructive airways disease, pulmonary embolus and pleural effusions will be considered. The specialised nursing care of such patients will also be discussed. Links to the evidence based practice guidelines pertaining to the management of these disorders will be made. This topic will also consider common disorders associated with the presentation of paediatric patients to the acute care setting.

    Complex Respiratory Disorders: Assessment and therapeutic management
    In this session students will have the opportunity to discuss clinical cases which demonstrate the pathophysiology, diagnosis, medical and nursing management of patients in the intensive care environment with advanced respiratory disorders. This session will focus on patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, the management of patients with pandemic influenza and advanced ventilation and therapeutic techniques including Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) or Bi-level ventilation and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO)


    Care of the Patient with Cardiac Failure
    Cardiac Physiology and Electrophysiology
    This topic will consider the principles of advanced cardiac physiology and how these relate to critical illness and intensive care therapeutics. In particular the physiological control of blood pressure and factors influencing cardiac output and tissue perfusion will be discussed.In this session the electrochemical basis of cardiac function will be presented. The basic principles of electrocardiography (ECG) such as the specific properties of cardiac tissue, cardiac action potential and the events of the cardiac cycle will be discussed. In addition the fundamental laws of electrocardiography and how these laws relate to the 12 lead ECG and cardiac monitoring will be will be presented with particular emphasis on the application of Einthoven's Triangle, the Triaxial and Hexaxial Reference Systems.

    Heart Failure
    Acute heart failure in critically ill patients adds a complexity to patient management. Acute Decompensated Heart failure (ADHF) is the leading cause of hospitalisations for patients > 65 years. Accordingly this lecture will focus on the diagnosis and management of ADHF in the context of the critical care environment.

    Cardiac monitoring, Assessment and Pharmacology
    The possible causes of arrhythmias, and the treatment and nursing care of patients with particular arrhythmias will be discussed. Principles of pharmacological management including the use of anti-arrhythmics and inotropic therapies in critical illness will be reviewed. This topic will be presented in two sessions and provide an introduction to the use of positive inotropic agents and antiarrhythmics in critical illness.

    Atrioventricular Blocks and Pacing
    This session will describe the mechanism of formation, assessment and management of atrioventricular blocks. Students will gain an understanding of the different methods of providing cardiac pacing. They will be challenged to apply their knowledge of symptomatic bradycardia and AV blocks to the delivery of this treatment modality. Focus will be on initiation and assessment of the effectiveness of this treatment and the nursing responsibilities required for patient management.

    12 Lead ECG Interpretation
    The process for 12 Lead ECG interpretation will be reviewed.
    Specific focus in the session will be given to:
    •    Recognition of conduction delays on the ECG.
    •    The definition and causes of bundle branch block will be considered.  In addition bi and trifascicular block will be considered. The clinical implications of these abnormalities will also be identified.
    •    Determination of the mean QRS axis on ECG
    •    In this session students will learn how to calculate the mean QRS axis on a 12 lead ECG. The causes of axis deviation and the clinical significance will also be discussed.
    •    Differentiation of broad complex tachycardia
    •    In this session students will learn some principles, which assist in the differentiation of broad complex supra-ventricular tachycardia (SVT) from ventricular tachycardia (VT).  
    •    Non cardiac ECG changes
    •    The effect major electrolyte imbalances, drugs, hypothermia and Central nervous system injury have on the electrocardiograph will be outlined.

    Care of the patient with acute coronary syndromes
    This session will consider the pathophysiology of unstable angina, non ST elevation myocardial infarction and ST elevation myocardial infarction. The clinical features manifested by patients suffering from these disorders will be presented and the diagnosis and differential diagnosis will be discussed. Students will learn how to recognise ECG changes associated with ischaemia and infarction. The Australian guidelines for the management of acute coronary syndromes will be discussed.


    Special Populations in Intensive care
    The final session for this semester will focus on the special needs of patient subgroups within the intensive care population. Specifically the management of paediatric patients in the adult intensive care environment, obstetric patients and patients with mental health or drug dependency concerns will be reviewed.




    Clinical Skills – Semester 1 2014

    Airway
    Endotracheal Tube Repositioning and Security
    Performing an Endotracheal/Tracheostomy Tube Cuff Check
    Performing Tracheal Suction via an Endotracheal / Tracheostomy Tube
    Care of a patient with an Endotracheal tube or Tracheostomy Tube insitu
    Breathing
    Caring for a Patient with a Pleural Drain insitu
    Arterial Blood Gas Sampling and Analysis
    Chest X ray Interpretation
    Commencing IPPV
    Care of a Ventilator Dependent Patient
    Care of a Patient following Extubation
    Circulation
    Care of a Patient on an Inotropic/Vasoactive Infusion
    Recording and analysing a 12 Lead ECG
    Caring for a patient with Temporary Pacing*
    Equipment
    Setting the Modes of the Unit Ventilator *
    Changing Oxygen and Ventilator Circuits *
    Assembly of Ventilators and Oxygen Circuits *
    Reflective Practice Semester 1
    Teamwork
    Leadership
    Intubation
    ETT Security
    Extubation






  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Synopsis Paper



    Presentation
    Formative



    Summative
    0%
    (Non-Graded Pass)

    30%
    5-6
    Essay Summative 30% 1-3, 6
    Exam Summative 40% 1-4
    Clinical Skills and Reflective Practice Diaries Pass/Fail 1, 3, 6
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Clinical Skills and Reflective Practice Diaries Pass/ Fail
    The assessment of skills will occur throughout the semester. Students will be assessed by the critical care registered nurses and clinical titleholders, with whom they work. Please refer to the information provided in the Clinical skills and Reflective Practice Diaries regarding skills assessment criteria.

    It is essential that students, who do not have exposure to a particular skill, may be discussed with the coordinator within enough time to arrange for clinical experience/demonstration to occur. The Semester 1 component of the skills and reflective diaries must be completed by end of semester and presented for assessment. The diaries will be graded Pass or Fail.
    Assessment Detail
    Development of a teaching package (50%) of total course grade
    This assessment will consist of 3 components a synopsis, background paper and presentation (15 minutes with 5 minute discussion)

    Students will be required to choose a topic of interest from the course content and prepare a teaching package to present to junior nursing staff (GNP and nursing students) within their clinical area.

    Synopsis Paper: The formative assessment will be the submission of a synopsis paper (1000 words) which outlines the intended content, key points for discussion, expected outcomes and strategies for presenting the material. Students will be required to identify appropriate preliminary resources on which further research and reading will be based. Students will receive written feedback on their proposed topic.
    Due Date: Week 5.

    Background Paper: The second component of the assessment will consist of a background (2000 words − 20%) paper in which the students will identify the topic, justify the relevance of the topic to clinical practice and provide a detailed review and critique of the topic and the principles for promoting adult learning. This piece will provide the foundation on which the presentation will be structured. This strategy enables students to receive written feedback on their understanding and review of the topic prior to presenting.
    Due Date: Week 9.

    Presentation: The third component of the assessment will be a 15 minute (with 5 minute for questions/discussion – 20%) presentation (2000 word equivalent)
    The students will be required to develop and present a presentation which demonstrates an understanding of the topic and an ability to convey it succinctly which incorporating skills in information delivery and an understanding of adult learning principles.
    Students will receive feedback on presentation style and understanding of the information
    Due Date: Week 13.

    Written Examination 2 hours (50%) of total course grade
    This assessment will be given to review and address the course content of the semester. It will include multiple choice and short answer questions designed to ensure summative knowledge of the course material has been achieved
    Due Date: Exam Week -to be advised on the MyUni website

    Clinical Skills and Reflective Practice Diaries Pass/ Fail
    Students will be required to achieve a level of “competent to practice independently” on a list of clinical skills integral to the course content and management of the intensive care patient. Students will be assessed by preceptors and Clinical titleholders within their institution for clinical competence. They will also receive a performance appraisal from this clinical support network at the completion of the semester. Due Date: Week 13

    The skills checklist complies with the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses (ACCCN) competency standards for critical care nurses.


    Assessment 1
    Synopsis Paper : Formative assessment
    Students are required to choose a topic of interest from the course content and prepare a teaching package aimed to the level of junior nursing staff (nursing graduates and nursing students) within their clinical area. Students will be required to present this topic in a 15 minute seminar to their fellow students for assessment, prior to presenting in the work environment.

    Students will be required to identify appropriate preliminary resources on which further research and reading will be based. Students will receive written feedback on their proposed topic.

    A list of potential topics and an example of a synopsis paper will be made available on myUni.
    Due Date: Week 5.

    Presentation
    The students will be required to develop and present a presentation which demonstrates an understanding of the topic and an ability to convey it succinctly which incorporates skills in information delivery and an understanding of adult learning principles. Due Date: Week 13 to be advised on the MyUni website

    Assessment 2
    Essay
    The essay must relate to the role of the nurse in current practice and identify how the topic being investigated improves patient care. Select one of the essay topics from the list outlined in the Study Guide. Due Date: Week 9.

    Assessment 3
    Examination
    The examination will consist of a combination of multiple choice questions and short answer questions. Students will be expected to be able to analyse patient situations. The examination will be two hours in duration and will examine the theory taught in Intensive Care I.
    Due Date: Exam Week -to be advised on the MyUni website.

    Assessment 4
    Clinical Skills and Reflective Practice Diaries
    The assessment of skills will occur throughout the semester. Students will be assessed by the critical care registered nurses and clinical titleholders, with whom they work. Please refer to the information provided in the Clinical skills and Reflective Practice Diaries regarding skills assessment criteria. Due Date: Week 13
    Submission
    Assessments, unless otherwise stated in your Study guide, are to be submitted electronically via Assignments in MyUni on the due date identified in this Study guide. Instructions for assignment submission are available for all students under Tutorials at www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/.

    An assessment submitted via MyUni must be submitted as a .doc, .docx or .rtf file. If submitting a PowerPoint presentation for marking, the .ppt or .pptx must be submitted as .pdf file. It is also important to submit your file under your name, such as surname.firstname. MyUni stamps all the other details against your filename once you submit your assessment.

    An Assignment Coversheet must be submitted with each assessment. The coversheet should be the first page of your assessment. A word version of the Assignment Coversheet is available to download at www.health.adelaide.edu.au/nursing/students/resources. The Plagiarism Statement must be signed and dated for your assessment to be marked (please note the details stated on the Assignment Coversheet). More information on avoiding Plagiarism is available at www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/plagiarism/.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Late Submission of Work
    All assessments should be submitted by the specified due date.
    Late submission without an approved extension will be penalised at the rate of 10% of available marks for each day after the due date. Work submitted more than ten days after the due date may be returned unmarked. This action will be taken to prevent students who do get their work in on time being disadvantaged.

    Word Limit
    You are advised to comply with word limits. You are, of course, not expected to achieve exactly the required length and a 10% leeway on either side is acceptable. However, a penalty of 5% of available marks will apply for word limit in excess of the 10% leeway.

    Presentation
    Your written work must comply with the formatting and referencing indicated in the School Academic Manual. Marks will be lost for failing to do so.

    Return of Assessments
    Marked assignments and feedback will be returned via MyUni. For further information relating to assessment refer to the Assessment for Coursework Programs Policy.

    Requesting a re-mark
    Any student who, after discussion of the result with the course coordinator, is still dissatisfied with the final grade awarded for a course, and who has specific grounds for objecting to the grade, may lodge a written request for a review of the result or an independent second assessment with the Head of School within 10 University business days from the date of notification of the result. Such a written request must contain details of the grounds on which the objection is based. Requests must include a summary of the reasons the student believes his or her assessment work deserves a higher grade. These reasons must be directly related to the academic quality of the work. Re-marks, for example, will not be granted where the grounds are that the student has paid tuition fees or incurred liability under HECS-HELP or FEE-HELP, or needs one or two additional marks to get a higher overall grade for the course. The Head of Learning and Teaching may seek the advice of the Postgraduate Learning and Teaching Sub-Committee, and will make a determination on review or second assessment, and inform the student of his or her decision in writing.
    Further guidelines and policies regarding examinations may be found on the examinations website www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/rules_policies.html.

    Resubmitting failed assignments
    In accordance with University Policy, the guidelines and conditions regarding resubmission are stated below. It should be noted that these guidelines concern work that has been assessed as ‘FAIL’.
    Course coordinators, in consultation with Head of Learning & Teaching and/or the Pre-Registration or Postgraduate Learning and Teaching Sub-Committee Chairperson, are responsible for determining the circumstances in which students may resubmit assessment tasks. In determining these circumstances, the following are considered.

    Students may only resubmit their work when:
    It will allow them to demonstrate that they have understood feedback on their work; and/or
    They might otherwise be at risk of failing the course; and/or
    When they have received a Fail grade with an underlying mark of 45-49%; or
    The final assessment task in the course is weighted at 20% or more of the total course assessment.

    In granting a resubmission, the deadline will be negotiated.

    The resubmitted work will be awarded no more than the minimum pass mark (i.e. 50%).
    If the resubmitted work does not achieve a pass, it cannot be submitted a third time, and a fail will be recorded.

    Students who accept an offer of resubmission must take into account the possible implications, such as eligibility for graduation should the reassessment not be able to be completed in time for their preferred ceremony.

    Unsatisfactory Academic Progress
    Students whose academic progress is considered to be unsatisfactory may be precluded from taking further studies in the program for which they are enrolled; or further enrolment in that program may not be permitted for one academic year; or they may be permitted to re-enrol, but with a restricted program of study. More information is available at www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/1803/.

    Plagiarism

    Students are reminded that plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty constitute a serious offence and can result in disciplinary procedures. Students are advised to read the policy Academic Honesty and Assessment Obligations for Coursework Students Policy & Coursework Students: Academic Dishonesty Procedures policy, available at www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/230/. The following definitions should be noted.

    Referencing: providing a full bibliographic reference to the source of the citation (in a style as determined by the School).
    Quotation: placing an excerpt from an original source into a paper using either quotation marks or indentation, with the source cited, using an approved referencing system in order to give credit to the original author.
    Paraphrasing: repeating a section of text using different words which retain the original meaning.
    Please note: changing just a few words does not constitute paraphrasing.


    Marking Guides
    Synopsis Formative Assignment
    Structure and Writing Style
    Structure
    • Introduces the topic of the presentation.

    • Clearly describes the way in which the presentation will proceed.

    • The synopsis is structured in a logical sequence so that the content flows (headings may be used to develop the structure).

    • The synopsis ends with a brief cogent, defendable conclusion that summarises the discussion within the body.

    Writing Style

    • The synopsis is written with clear sentence structure and the spelling and grammar are correct.
    Content
    • The synopsis paper summarises the topic/issue adequately.

    • The synopsis content has clear links to contemporary nursing theory and clinical practice.
    Referencing
    • The referencing style used throughout the summary paper is congruent with the department’s Student handbook and style guide.

    • The reference list is accurate (i.e. no missing page numbers, volumes, correct title etc), complete (i.e. no references in the body of the paper are missing from the reference list) and consistent with the department’s Student handbook and style guide.

    • The references cited are contemporary (i.e. less than 10 years old unless seminal papers).

    • Primary references are used predominantly (i.e. the original reference has been cited rather than a secondary source).

    • There is evidence in the summary paper that the student has searched widely for information related to the topic/issue.

    • The student has acknowledged all sources of information.

    • Direct quotations are only used to make crucial points or to support the discussion/argument.


    Presentation
    Structure 25%
    Introduces the topic and states aims of the presentation.

    Clearly describes the way in which the presentation will proceed.

    The presentation is structured in a logical sequence so that the content flows.

    The presentation ends with a brief cogent, defendable conclusion that summarises the discussion within the presentation.

    The time for the presentation is managed well, allowing adequate time for questions/debate at the conclusion of the presentation.
    Content and Critical Analysis 60%
    Content (30%)
    The presentation has covered the topic sufficiently.

    The presentation content has clear links to contemporary nursing theory and clinical practice.

    The student's presentation demonstrates a depth of understanding of the topic and associated significant issues.

    Critical analysis (30%)
    The presentation demonstrates a high degree of critical thought and insight by:
         o providing justification/rationale for the discussion
         o demonstrating they have reflected on the complex issues surrounding the topic
         o discussing the topic from differing perspectives, thereby providing a balanced discussion
    Discussion and Presentation Style 15%
    Material is presented in an interesting manner.

    The student uses learning resources appropriately.

    The group's interest is maintained by the student.

    The student:
         o is audible
         o faces the audience
         o responds to questions in an appropriate fashion
         o leads an interactive discussion that challenges the group to issues related to their nursing practice


    Essay
    Structure and Writing Style 25%
    Structure (15%)
    Introduces/outlines/situates the topic of the essay

    Clearly describes the way in which the essay will proceed

    The essay is structured in a logical sequence so that the content flows (headings may be used to develop the structure of the paper)

    The essay ends with a cogent, defendable conclusion that summarises the discussion within the body of the paper

    Writing Style (10%)
    The essay is written with clear sentence structure, clarity of argument and precision of expression and the spelling and grammar are correct
    Content and Critical Analysis 60%
    Content (30%)
    The essay question has been answered or the topic/issue has been discussed

    The essay content has clear links to contemporary nursing practice

    The student’s paper demonstrates a depth of understanding of the topic and significant issues

    Critical Analysis (30%)
    The essay demonstrates a high degree of critical thought and insight by:
         o providing a justification/rationale for the argument/discussion
         o demonstrating they have reflected on the complex issues surrounding the topic/question
         o discussing the topic from differing perspectives, thereby providing a balanced argument/discussion.
    Referencing 15%
    The referencing style used throughout the summary paper is congruent with the School Academic Manual

    The reference list is accurate (i.e. no missing page numbers, volumes, correct title etc.), complete (i.e. no references in the body of the paper are missing from the reference list) and consistent with the School Academic Manual

    The references cited are contemporary (i.e. less than 10 years old unless seminal papers)

    Primary references are used predominantly (i.e. the original reference has been cited rather than a secondary source

    There is evidence in the summary paper that the student has searched widely for information related to the topic/issue

    The student has acknowledged all sources of information

    Direct quotations are only used to make crucial points or to support the discussion/argument.


    Examination Marking Guide
    Topic
    The examination will consist of a combination of multiple choice questions and short answer questions. Students will be expected to be able to analyse patient situations. The examination will be two hours in duration and will examine the theory taught in Intensive Care I

    Multiple choice questions
    There is only one correct answer for each item. If more than one answer is indicated, no marks will be awarded.
    Generally you will have one minute for each multiple-choice question.

    Short answer questions

    Generally you will have one and a half minutes in which to answer each written question.
    You should ensure that you comply with the directions for each question. For example, if the question asks you to discuss an issue and you list your answer, then marks will be deducted.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.