NURSING 7136 - Intensive Care II

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2017

This course will develop the skills and knowledge obtained in Intensive Care I. This course considers the pathophysiology of complex patient conditions requiring intensive care, as well as assessment, monitoring and advanced therapeutics. The content builds on the foundation knowledge from Intensive Care I by continuing a systems approach to the development of advanced intensive care nursing knowledge and practice. Content will focus on care of the patient with neurological, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, haematological and multisystem disorders. Promotion of evidence based practice will be integral to course delivery and clinical case review The focus will be on the collaborative multidisciplinary management of the complex intensive care patient and the critical care nurse's role within this team. Leadership skills will be developed through a workshop to prepare students to take on advance practice roles in the intensive care unit.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code NURSING 7136
    Course Intensive Care II
    Coordinating Unit School of Nursing
    Term Semester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Prerequisites NURSING 7135
    Corequisites NURSING7118
    Assumed Knowledge Systems Anatomy and Physiology
    Restrictions Available to M.NursSc students only
    Course Description This course will develop the skills and knowledge obtained in Intensive Care I. This course considers the pathophysiology of complex patient conditions requiring intensive care, as well as assessment, monitoring and advanced therapeutics. The content builds on the foundation knowledge from Intensive Care I by continuing a systems approach to the development of advanced intensive care nursing knowledge and practice. Content will focus on care of the patient with neurological, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, haematological and multisystem disorders. Promotion of evidence based practice will be integral to course delivery and clinical case review The focus will be on the collaborative multidisciplinary management of the complex intensive care patient and the critical care nurse's role within this team.
    Leadership skills will be developed through a workshop to prepare students to take on advance practice roles in the intensive care unit.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mrs Sindy Millington

    Course Coordinator: Sindy Millington
    Phone: +61 8 8222 4387
    Email: sindy.millington@adelaide.edu.au

    Student Liason Officer:
    Phone: +61 8 8313 3596
    Email: nursing.studentliaison@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Demonstrate knowledge of the pathophysiological nature of disorders resulting in critical illness in a clinical based scenario.
    2 Integrate advanced and integrated theoretical and clinical knowledge required for the, assessment and management of the complex critically ill patient
    3 Demonstrate a systems approach to the assessment, monitoring and support of physiological function in the critically ill patient
    4 Integrates care which is patient centred and embraces cultural diversity, individuality and experience
    5 Demonstrate the ability to work as leaders in advanced practice roles within a collaborative multidisciplinary team
    6 Evaluate and integrates the use of analytical enquiry and critical reflection into nursing practice, through contemporary issues, i.e. current evidence based guidelines, and consensus statements, in intensive care nursing.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,3-5
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2-4, 6
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1,3, 5, 6.
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    3, 4, 5-6
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    5-6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    5-6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    In this course you should use the texts prescribed for Intensive Care I.

    Choose one of the following:

    Bersten, A & Soni, N (eds) 2013, Oh’s intensive care manual, 6th edn, Butterworth Heinemann Elsevier, Philadelphia.

    Elliott, D, Aitken, L & Chaboyer, W (eds) 2015, ACCCN’s critical care nursing, Mosby Elsevier, Sydney.

    Urden, L, Stacy, K & Lough, M (eds) 2013, Critical care nursing, diagnosis and management, 6th edn, Mosby Elsevier, St Louis (available as an electronic book from the University of Adelaide Library)

    Reader
    The readings for this course are available electronically via MyUni.
    Please note: it is your responsibility to organise printing should you prefer a hard copy of the reader.
    Recommended Resources
    Anatomy and Physiology
    Saladin, KS 2010, Anatomy & physiology; the unity of form and function, 5th Edn, McGraw Hill, Boston.
    OR
    Martini, FH 2006, Fundamentals of anatomy & physiology, 7th edn, Pearson, San-Francisco.

    Pharmacology

    Bryant, B & Knight, K 2010, Pharmacology for health professionals, 2nd edn, Elsevier- health science Division.
    OR
    Bullock, S, Galbraith, A, Hunt, B, Manias,Richards, A.  E 2015, Fundamentals of Pharmacology, E-book , Routledge, Chapman  & hall , Incoroprated.

    Haemodynamic Monitoring

    Lough M 2015, Haemodynamic Monitoring e-book, Butterworth HeinemannElsevier , Philidelphia 
    OR
    Pinksy MR (ed) 2004 Functional Haemodynamic Monitoring, Springer-Verlag, Berlin (available as an electronic book from the University of Adelaide Library)

    Note: You are not required to buy the recommended texts. However, they provide valuable supplementary reading on various aspects of the material covered within this course and you are encouraged to have a look at them.

    As a student at the University of Adelaide you also have free access to a large variety of quality electronic textbooks. These can be accessed online through the library website by entering the E-Journals A-Z link and selecting-books only.

    This course will require the following resources:
    1. Library
    2. Clinical Skills Laboratory
    3. Lecture / tutorial facilities
    4. Pod casting facilities
    5. Clinical equipment
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course employs on campus delivery of material by a variety of teaching methods to promote learning. A mix of lectures including guest speakers, tutorials, practical skill demonstration and case study review will be incorporated into the sessions. Students will be challenged to develop and demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving skills.

    Student participation and discussion will be expected in all sessions.

    Lectures
    Course lectures are on Wednesdays 8.30am to 1pm on the University of Adelaide or Royal Adelaide Hospital Campus, North Terrace. Lecture locations will be made available on the MyUni website.

    Reading
    There are several recommended texts for this course and a reading list has been compiled and made available on MyUni. For each lecture, readings have been carefully chosen. All of these required and recommended readings have been selected to optimise your knowledge on the topic and so that they will continue to be of use to you after you graduate.

    Clinical Practice and Skill Acquisition
    This course supplements theoretical knowledge acquisition with field based learning. Students are required to complete clinical skills and work a minimum of 300 clinical hours in intensive care during this semester.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Lectures
    The student is expected to attend Course lectures every Wednesday morning from 8:30 am to 1 pm on the University of Adelaide or Royal Adelaide Hospital Campus, North Terrace. Lecture locations will be made available on the MyUni website. Student participation and discussion will be expected in all sessions.

    Readings

    A reading list has been compiled for this course and will be made available through MyUni. Lecture and readings have been carefully chosen. All of these are required and recommended readings have been selected to optimise your knowledge on the topic and so that they will continue to be of use after you graduate.

    Clinical Practice and Skills Acquisition
    This course supplements theoretical knowledge with field based learning. Students are required to complete clinical skills and work a minimum of 300 clinical skills in intensive care during this semester.
    Learning Activities Summary
    The course content will include the following:
    Advanced haemodynamic monitoring and management
    Advanced Haemodynamic monitoring
    PAC
    PiCCO
    Management of Haemodynamic instability
    Hypertensive crises
    Hypotension
    Pharmacological management

    Advanced management
    Transportation of the complex ICU patient

    Care of the patient with neurologic alterations
    Physiological Principles
    Neurological clinical assessment of raised ICP, diagnosis and monitoring
    1. Angiography
    2. CT
    3. LP
    4. ICP and EVD
    Neurosurgical and Neurologic Disorders and Therapeutic Management
    Management of ICH
    5. Pharmacological management
    Neuro surgical
    6. TBI
    7. Aneurysms
    Neurological
    GBS
    Myasthenia Gravis

    Care of the patient with renal failure
    Physiological Principles
    Renal Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis
    Renal Disorders and therapeutic Management
    Acute Renal Failure
    ATN
    Chronic Renal Failure
    Renal Replacement Therapy
    Dialysis

    Care of the patient with cardiovascular surgical disorders
    Cardiothoracic Surgery
    IABP
    Therapeutic Management
    Vascular Surgery
    Thoracic and abdominal aneurysms
    Carotid endartectomy
    Postoperative care

    Care of the patient with gastrointestinal disorders
    Physiological Principles
    Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis
    Gastrointestinal Disorders and Therapeutic Management
    Acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage
    Acute Pancreatitis
    Fulminant Hepatic Failure
    Pharmacological Management

    Care of the patient with endocrine disorders
    Physiological Principles
    Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis
    Endocrine Disorders and therapeutic Management
    Neuroendocrinology of Stress and Critical Illness
    Adrenal Gland Dysfunction
    Adrenal crisis
    8. Phaeochromocytoma
    Antidiuretic Hormone Dysfunction
    SIADH
    DI
    Emergencies for patients with Diabetes mellitus
    Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar state
    Thyroid Emergencies

    Care of patients with haematological and oncological emergencies
    Physiologic Principles of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis
    Management of Massive Blood transfusion and Critical Bleeding
    Haematological disorders and therapeutic management
    DIC
    Thrombocytopenia
    Tumour Lysis Syndrome

    Care of the patient with multisystem alterations
    Shock
    Hypovolaemic
    Cardiogenic
    Anaphylactic
    Neurogenic
    Severe Sepsis and septic shock
    SIRS and MODS
    Collaborative and therapeutic management
    Pharmacology and haemodynamic profiles

    Trauma
    Mechanisms of Injury
    Principles of Assessment and Management
    Thoracic Trauma
    Abdominal Trauma
    Musculoskeletal injuries
    Orthopaedic
    Spinal
    Complications of Multi trauma

    Thermal injuries and disorders
    Burns
    Pathophysiology and aetiology
    Classification and assessment
    Therapeutic Management
    Thermal disorders
    Hypothermia
    Hyperthermia

    Brain death, organ donation and transplantation and End of life care
    Physiology of Brain death
    Assessment and diagnosis of brain death
    Organ Donation Care of the Donor and Family
    Organ Transplantation
    End of Life care
    Withdrawal of Life support
    Caring for bereaved families

    Poisoning and envenomation

    Leadership
    Workshop week 13
    Specific Course Requirements

    This course considers the pathophysiology of patient conditions requiring intensive care, as well as assessment, monitoring and therapeutics. Specifically topics considered will be:

    Advanced Intensive Care

    This session will cover some of the fundamental aspects of advanced care in the intensive care unit. One of the challenges for newly accredited intensive care nurses is the consideration of the legal, moral and ethical aspects of end of life decision making and end of life care. Students will be encouraged to discuss and review these issues and their role as a member of the multidisciplinary team.

    The advanced practice skills of advanced airway and tracheostomy management will be discussed and demonstrated, highlighting the importance of planning, assessment and advanced skill acquisition in the areas of tracheostomy change, management and decannulation

    Intrahospital patient transportation is another advanced skill in which the critical care nurse practices with minimal supervision or support. Familiarity with the patient, the equipment and the environment is essential to ensure safe patient management.

    Haemodynamic Monitoring

    This topic will consider the principles of haemodynamic monitoring as well as the details of specific cardiac output measurement modalities. The terminology relating to haemodynamic monitoring as well as indications for nursing management and possible complications will be considered. The accuracy and analysis of monitored parameters will also be examined. This session will build on knowledge gained in the introduction to haemodynamic monitoring in Critical Care Essentials

    Critical Bleeding and Massive Blood Transfusion

    The issues pertaining to the management of incidence of critical bleeding will be reviewed. Massive blood transfusion (MBT) will be discussed and the storage lesion of blood presented. The possible complications and the nursing care of patients following a critical bleeding event and MBT will be examined.

    Intensive Care Management of the Trauma Management

    This module describes the general principles of trauma management and then considers thoracic, abdominal, skeletal and spinal injuries management in an intensive care context.

    Intensive Care of Patients with Multi system alterations – Shocked States

    This topic will consider the factors resulting in cardiovascular instability. The pathophysiology of shock will be discussed in detail. The specialised nursing care and treatment of different forms of shock will also be presented.

    Intensive Care Management of Patients post cardiovascular surgery

    Vascular Surgery

    Common types of vascular surgery that necessitate patient admission to intensive care and the particular nursing care required will be presented.

    Cardiac Surgery/Intra-Aortic Balloon Counter pulsation

    This topic will consider the common types of cardiac surgery and the post-operative nursing and medical management of such patients. The recognition and management of possible complications will also be considered. The intra-aortic balloon counter pulsation device, its indications, the nursing management and possible complications will be addressed.

    Intensive Care Management of patients with neurosurgical / neurological disorders

    This topic will consider the mechanisms of head injury as well as the assessment and management of patients during the acute phase. Non traumatic Neurosurgical presentations will also be discussed. Neurological monitoring, in particular neurological assessment, intracranial pressure monitoring, and the specialised nursing care of these patients will be addressed.

    Brain Death, Organ Donation and caring for bereaved families

    Brain death, its recognition, and the management of the brain dead patient will be considered. The nursing actions that may help support friends and relatives of the brain dead patient will also be discussed.

    In this session the process of organ donation will be discussed. In particular, donor characteristics, evaluation of the recipient, and ICU management of a donor will be discussed. Review of the differences between a brain dead donor and a non-heart beating donor will be identified and the management critiqued

    Ways in which the family and loved ones of the donor may be supported at this time will be explored.

    Intensive Care of Patients in Renal Failure

    This topic will consider the causes and pathophysiology of acute renal failure. The common treatment modalities will be compared and contrasted. The indications for, principles and the management of continuous renal replacement therapy will also be addressed. The specialised nursing care of patients with acute renal failure requiring continuous renal replacement therapy will be examined.

    Care of patients with Haematological and Oncological emergencies

    Haemostatic failures including coagulopathies are reviewed in this session. Normal coagulation, and the recognition and management of common disorders of coagulation such as Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy (DIC) will be considered. The specialised nursing care of patients with coagulation disorders will be presented

    The complexities of caring for patients admitted to the intensive care unit with oncologic emergencies and the complex care required will be reviewed

    Intensive Care of Patient’s with Endocrine Disorders

    Endocrine derangements and disorders prevalent in the critically ill will be described including abnormalities in the functioning of the thyroid, parathyroid and adrenal glands. The nursing management and the resulting disorders and the impact on critical illness will be explored

    Intensive Care of patients suffering toxicology / toxinology disorders

    In this session the clinical features and possible treatment of common drug overdoses and poisoning will be presented.

    In this session the general management of a patient who has suffered envenomation will be discussed. In particular, the first aid, initial in hospital care and ICU management. The physiological effects of envenomation by common Australian snakes and spiders will also be discussed.

    Intensive Care of Patients with Thermal injuries and Disorders


    Burns Trauma
    This topic will consider the management of patients who have suffered burns trauma, in particular, the resuscitation of patients with burns and recognition of possible complications of burns. The specialised nursing care of patients with severe burns will also be discussed.

    Hypo/Hyperthermia

    This topic will consider the causes, clinical features, treatment and specialised nursing care in ICU of a patient with hyper or hypothermia.

    Intensive Care of Patient’s with Gastrointestinal Disorders

    In this session the pathophysiology of acute hepatic failure will be discussed. In particular the causes, clinical features, possible treatment and nursing care will be presented. Other significant gastrointestinal presentations to intensive care will also be reviewed including Severe Acute Pancreatitis and Gastrointestinal bleeding


    CLINICAL SKILLS – Semester 2 ,2016

    CLINICAL SKILLS
    Airway
    Assisting with a Percutaneous Tracheostomy
    Changing a Tracheostomy Tube
    Decannulation
    Breathing
    Commencing non-invasive ventilation*
    Care of a Patient requiring Non-Invasive Ventilation*
    Setup and management of a Ventilator Scavenging System
    Circulation
    Preparation and assisting in insertion of a Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC)
    Care of a patient with a Pulmonary Artery Catheter
    Measuring pulmonary artery wedge pressure
    Measuring cardiac output by the Thermodilution Technique via a PAC
    Removal of a Pulmonary Artery Catheter
    Alternate Cardiac Output Monitoring Techniques
    Management of a patient with an Intra-aortic Balloon Pump
    Neurological
    Caring for a patient with Intracranial Pressure Monitoring
    Coordinating the turning of a patient with an Acute Spinal Injury
    Renal
    Measurement of intra-bladder pressure
    Setting up continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration/dialysis
    Caring for a patient requiring continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration
    Transport
    Transport of a critically ill patient within the hospital
    Infection Control
    Management of a patient with an infectious disease requiring isolation
    Reflective Practice
    Decannulation
    Medical emergency
    Infection control
    Professional practice
    Professional practice – Coroner






     

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Part IA - Outline
    Part IB– Case Study
    Formative
    Summative
    0%
    25%
    1-3, 6
    Pre-sighted Written Examination Summative 20% 1-4
    Structured Clinical Assessment Summative 55% 1-4
    Clinical Skills and Reflective Practice Diaries Summative Pass/Fail 1, 3, 6
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Clinical Skills and Reflective Practice Diaries Pass/ Fail
    The assessment of skills will occur throughout the semester. Students will be assessed by the critical care registered nurses and clinical titleholders, with whom they work. Please refer to the information provided in the Clinical skills and Reflective Practice Diaries regarding skills assessment criteria.

    It is essential that students, who do not have exposure to a particular skill, may be discussed with the coordinator within enough time to arrange for clinical experience/demonstration to occur. The Semester 2 component of the skills and reflective diaries must be completed by end of semester and presented for assessment. The diaries will be graded Pass or Fail. Due Date: Week 13
    Assessment Detail
    Formative Assessment 1A - Case Study Plan and Search Strategy:
    Due Date: Week 5
    Weighting: 0% NGA
    Length: 500 words
    This assessment is scheduled early in the semester to assist in the planning and development of your case study, so that you can receive feedback on your work before handing in your final assignment.

    Topic
    The case chosen must be relevant to the course content for Intensive Care II
    Once you have selected a topic:
    • Identify the topic and provide a brief paragraph which situates the topic, providing background, identifying the significance to critical care nursing and any limitations or boundaries of your intended work.
    (This is designed to assist in the development of the introduction for your final case study).
    • Provide a rough plan (in dot point form) of your case study identifying headings that demonstrate a logical sequence and structure for your proposed paper.
    • Outline the key points to be discussed using the headings identified above and the issues to be critiqued.
    (This is designed to assist in the development of the content of the paper ensuring the topic and significant issues are covered appropriately, and from a variety of perspectives).
    • Describe the search strategy undertaken to identify preliminary references including key words and databases used.
    (This is to ensure contemporary and reliable resources support your work).
    • Provide a reference list containing 5 preliminary references on the topic which complies with the School of Nursing Student Handbook and Style Guide.
    (This list will need to be expanded for your final case study).

    A high academic writing standard is required with key points in text referenced appropriately.
    Please ensure the patient's anonymity and confidentiality is maintained. The use and identification of a pseudonym is required. Work not complying with this guideline will be returned unmarked to the student.


    Summative Assessment 1B – Case study:
    Due Date: Week 9
    Weighting: 25%
    Length: 2000 words

    Topic

    Preamble
    Case studies allow clinical episodes and practices to be articulated and explored. The case study should be about a patient you have cared for, relating actual events in which you were involved and critiquing the clinical events based upon the literature.
    When writing the final case study the following points should be considered:
    • the patient's diagnosis
    • relevant past history
    • nursing care
    • treatment
    • psychosocial aspects of care
    • clinical progress and outcome
    • discharge planning
    • a critique of the care given.
    The case study should summarise the nursing and medical treatment the patient received and then critique this in the light of current practice and knowledge.

    The case study should be structured as an academic paper with the following sections:
    • Introduction outlining the case study’s structure
    • Body of text that covers the following areas:
         • presents the patient’s story—includes clinical presentation, diagnosis, any relevant history and pathophysiology of the patient’s condition
         • nursing assessment and discharge planning undertaken during the clinical admission to the relevant area
         • outlines the clinical progress of the patient, including interdisciplinary interventions (with an emphasis on nursing)
         • critiques the nursing management of the patient and interprets the outcomes of interventions, supported with relevant (and appropriate) literature
    • Conclusion that summarises the patient case study.


    Assessment 2 – Structured Clinical Assessment:
    Due Date: Exam week TBC with clinical institution
    Weighting: 55%
    Length: 30 minutes

    Topic

    This practically based examination will test the student's ability to apply knowledge to practice. The examination will cover all skills and knowledge taught in Intensive Care II and will be approximately 30 minutes long. The Structured Clinical Assessment examination will be held during the first University Exam Week.

    Procedure Guide

    Time – 30 minutes for a 55% course weighting (6 unit course).
    Course coordinators must be present at all assessments. The assessment team will consist of the course coordinator and a clinical titleholder from the student’s clinical workplace.
    Structured Clinical Assessments should be conducted within student’s workplace.
    A marking guide for the assessment will be developed that clearly identifies allocated points for specific answers.

    Course coordinators need to clearly identify points within each question that constitute clinical safety. If the student fails to identify/demonstrate these points they will not have successfully completed this question.
    Students who demonstrate unsafe practice during the structured clinical assessment will not have successfully completed the examination regardless of their overall mark. This is a hurdle assessment and students will be reassessed at the discretion of the course coordinator in the supplementary examination period.

    Assessment 3 – Presighted Written Examination:
    Due Date: Exam week TBC
    Weighting: 20%
    Length: 2 hours

    Topic

    The examination will consist of three long answer questions.
    Students will be given five exam questions three weeks prior to the exam to use in revision. The exam will consist of three of these five questions. Students will be expected to be able to analyse patient situations. The examination will be two hours in duration and will examine the theory taught in Intensive Care II.

    Marking Guide – Examination
    You should ensure that you comply with the directions for each question and that your writing is legible. For clarity, try to write your answers in a systematic and logical fashion


    List of terms
    Please make yourself familiar with the following terms.
    Analyse Examine critically, so as to bring out the essential elements or give the essence of.
    Compare Look for qualities or characteristics that resemble each other. Emphasise similarities.
    Contrast Stress the dissimilarities, differences, or unlikeliness of things, qualities, events or problems.
    Criticise Express your judgment about the merit or truth of the factors or views mentioned. Give the results of your analysis of these factors, discussing their limitations and good points.
    Define Give concise, clear and authoritative meanings. Don't give details, but make sure to give the limits of the definition. Show how the thing you are defining differs from things in other cases.
    Describe Recount, characterise, sketch or relate is sequence or story form.
    Discuss Examine, analyse carefully and give reasons pro and con. Be complete and give details.
    Enumerate Write a list or outline form, giving points concisely one by one.
    Evaluate
    Explain
    Illustrate Use a figure, picture, diagram or concrete example to explain or clarify a problem.
    Interpret Translate, give example of, solve, or comment on, a subject - usually giving your judgment on it.
    Justify Prove and give reasons for decisions or conclusions, taking pains to be convincing.
    List As in enumerate, write an itemised series of concise statements.
    Outline Organise a description under main points and subordinate points, omitting minor details and stressing the arrangements or classification of things.
    Relate Show how things are related to, or connected with, each other or how one causes another correlated with another or is like another.
    Review Examine a subject critically, analysing and commenting on the important statements to be made about it.
    State Present the main points in brief, clear sequence, usually omitting details and illustrations or examples.
    Summarise Give the main points or facts in condensed form, like the summary of a chapter, omitting details, and illustrations.
    Trace In a narrative form describe progress, development, or historical events from some point or origin.
    (Adapted from Bird, C & Bird D 1945, Learning more by effective study, Appleton Century Crofts, New York).

    Assessment 4: Clinical Skills and Reflective Practice Diaries
    Due Date: Week 12
    Weighting: Pass / Fail

    Topic

    The assessment of skills will occur throughout the semester. Students will be assessed by the critical care registered nurses and clinical titleholders, with whom they work. Please refer to the information provided in the Clinical skills and Reflective Practice Diaries regarding skills assessment criteria. It is essential that students, who do not have exposure to a particular skill, negotiate with the coordinator within enough time to arrange for clinical experience to occur. The Semester 1 component of the skills and reflective diaries must be completed by end of course and presented for assessment. The diaries will be graded pass or fail.
    Submission
    Assessments, unless otherwise stated in your Study guide, are to be submitted electronically via Assignments in MyUni on the due date identified in this Study guide. Instructions for assignment submission are available for all students under Tutorials at www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/.

    An assessment submitted via MyUni must be submitted as a .doc, .docx or .rtf file. If submitting a PowerPoint presentation for marking, the .ppt or .pptx must be submitted as .pdf file. It is also important to submit your file under your name, such as surname.firstname. MyUni stamps all the other details against your filename once you submit your assessment.

    An Assignment Coversheet must be submitted with each assessment. The coversheet should be the first page of your assessment. A word version of the Assignment Coversheet is available to download at www.health.adelaide.edu.au/nursing/students/resources. The Plagiarism Statement must be signed and dated for your assessment to be marked (please note the details stated on the Assignment Coversheet).

    More information on avoiding Plagiarism is available at www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/plagiarism/.
    If you have difficulty submitting your assignment, you can call the MyUni helpdesk from 8am to 6pm 08 8303 3335.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Marking Guide – Case Study Plan and Search Strategy Formative Assessment
    Structure and Writing Style
    Structure
    • introduces/outlines/situates the topic of the case study

    • provides a clear justification for the case choice and its significance

    • The case study plan is structured in a logical sequence so that the content flows

    Writing style

    • the case study plan is written with clear sentence structure, clarity of argument and precision of expression and the spelling and grammar are correct.
    Content/Critique
    • the key points for the topic/issue have been identified

    • the proposed content has clear links to contemporary nursing practice

    • the student’s case study plan demonstrates an understanding of the significant issues surrounding the case.

    • the key points identified demonstrates the student has considered the topic from alternative perspectives
    Search Strategy
    • relevant databases and sources of evidence clearly identified in search strategy

    • key words / phrases clearly identified that are appropriate and relative to the search strategy and question

    • evidence of conduct of search with appropriate application of Boolean logic (‘and’, ‘or’, ‘not’) and search limiters
    Referencing
    • the referencing style used throughout the paper is congruent with the School’s Student Handbook and Style Guide

    • the reference list is accurate (i.e. no missing page numbers, volumes, correct title etc), complete (i.e. no references in the body of the paper are missing from the reference list) and consistent with the Student Handbook and Style Guide

    • the references cited are contemporary (i.e. less than 10 years old unless seminal papers)


    Marking Guide - Case Study
    Structure and Writing Style 25%
    Structure (15%)
    • Introduces the patient structure of the study.

    • Clearly describes the way in which the case study will proceed (follows the suggested outline within the Study Guide).

    • The case study is structured according to the suggested outline with headings used to indicate the sections.

    • The case study summaries the case details and recommendations are made for enhancement of care.

    Writing Style (10%)

    • The case study is written with clear sentence structure, clarity of argument, precision of expression and the spelling and grammar are correct. Confidentiality is maintained
    Content and Critical Analysis 60%
    Content (30%)
    • The case study has been presented logically;

    • The case study’s content has clear links to contemporary nursing practice;

    • The student’s paper demonstrates a depth of understanding of the topic and related nursing issues.

    Critical analysis (30%)

    • The case study demonstrates a high degree of critical thought and insight into the patient's condition and nursing care provided by:

         • providing a justification/rationale for the argument/discussion (or analysis) pertaining to nursing care;

         • demonstrating they have reflected on the complex issues surrounding the nursing care;

         • discussing the nursing care from differing perspectives, thereby providing a balanced argument/discussion.
    Referencing 15%
    • The referencing style used throughout the summary paper is congruent with the Student Handbook and Style Guide.

    • The reference list is accurate (i.e. no missing page numbers, volumes, correct title etc), complete (i.e. no references in the body of the paper are missing from the reference list) and consistent with the Student Handbook and Style Guide.

    • The references cited are contemporary (i.e. less than 10 years old unless seminal papers).

    • Primary references are used predominantly (i.e. the original reference has been cited rather than a secondary source).

    • There is evidence in the summary paper that the student has searched widely for information related to the topic/issue.

    • The student has acknowledged all sources of information.

    • Direct quotations are only used to make crucial points or to support the discussion/argument.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

    Extension of time for assessment items
    Up to one week
    It is expected that all assessments will be submitted on or by the specified due date.

    However, students may apply for an extension of time to submit an assessment, if they are experiencing difficulty. Applications for extension must be made to the Student Liaison Officer, in writing (e.g. email) prior to the due date lodgement of the assignment. Students must anticipate that it may take a few days to receive a reply. The grounds for granting an extension include health problems, compassionate reasons and other extenuating circumstances. Extensions will usually only be granted for a maximum of one week, but can be longer at the discretion of the Chairperson of the Postgraduate Learning and Teaching Sub-Committee if substantiated with evidence such as a medical certificate. Only original documents or certified copies of originals will be accepted.

    You will be notified by email to your University of Adelaide student email account of the outcome of your application. If your extension is granted then it is your responsibility to keep in contact with the course coordinator and to hand in the assessment with a copy of the email (or other document) approving the extension.

    Failure to submit an assessment item on time without an approved extension will incur a penalty as detailed under Late Submission of Work.

    Longer than one week
    The form for requesting an extension longer than one week can be downloaded from the School of Nursing web site www.health.adelaide.edu.au/nursing/students/resources/ or obtained from the administrative office in the School. Students should complete the form and submit it to the Student Liaison Officer, attaching any supporting documents. Only original documents or certified copies of the originals will be accepted. When an extension is granted, the extension request approved must be attached to the assessment item when it is submitted.

    You will be notified by email to your University of Adelaide student email account of the outcome of your application. If your extension is granted then it is your responsibility to keep in contact with the course coordinator and to hand in the assignment with a copy of the email (or other document) approving the extension.

    Failure to submit an assessment item on time without an approved extension will incur a penalty as detailed under Late Submission of Work.
  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.