INTBUS 7503 - International Entrepreneurship and Innovation (M)

North Terrace Campus - Trimester 3 - 2018

This course analyses how international opportunity identification and exploitation are often critical to the firm's long term growth and survival and often results in the firm seeking to exploit those opportunities by entering overseas markets. The course focuses on the development of skills to identify and evaluate international business opportunities by ventures that aspire to become international or extend the scope of existing international operations. Specific topics include understanding entrepreneurship and innovation as a process; opportunity identification competencies; cross-border expansion opportunities and challenges that entrepreneurs' face such as, for example, market entry, resourcing international operations (e.g. exporting), forming alliances, managing growth, and cross-border financing in different regions of the world. The course thereby provides students with the opportunity to focus on specific issues facing small to medium sized enterprises, some of which are also family run firms. Students develop an understanding of the constraints and advantages in developing a new venture and managing the additional burden of internationalization, which for some new ventures is rapid or accelerated.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code INTBUS 7503
    Course International Entrepreneurship and Innovation (M)
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Trimester 3
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 36 hours per trimester
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites COMMGMT 7104, ECON 7200, ACCTNG 7025, INTBUS 7500, COMMERCE 7039, COMMGMT 7006
    Course Description This course analyses how international opportunity identification and exploitation are often critical to the firm's long term growth and survival and often results in the firm seeking to exploit those opportunities by entering overseas markets. The course focuses on the development of skills to identify and evaluate international business opportunities by ventures that aspire to become international or extend the scope of existing international operations. Specific topics include understanding entrepreneurship and innovation as a process; opportunity identification competencies; cross-border expansion opportunities and challenges that entrepreneurs' face such as, for example, market entry, resourcing international operations (e.g. exporting), forming alliances, managing growth, and cross-border financing in different regions of the world. The course thereby provides students with the opportunity to focus on specific issues facing small to medium sized enterprises, some of which are also family run firms. Students develop an understanding of the constraints and advantages in developing a new venture and managing the additional burden of internationalization, which for some new ventures is rapid or accelerated.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Glen Wheatley

    Course Coordinator and Facilitator: Glen B. Wheatley

    Glen runs the boutique strategy advisory firm Best Solutions International. He co-founded an angel-financed start-up in Germany and has been involved in various start-ups as advisor, board member and angel investor.

    His career has taken him on project and long-term assignments in Europe, Australasia, and the Americas, including Greater China, Germany and Mexico.

    Glen has experience in both manufacturing and services. He worked with various types of organisations: from sole traders to some of the largest global companies.

    Glen is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and holds a BA (University of Michigan); MBA (Thunderbird School of Global Management); Graduate Certificate in Science and Technology Commercialisation, and a Master of Applied Innovation and Entrepreneurship (University of Adelaide). He has also completed coursework at Harvard Business School, namely “Disruptive Strategy”, “Leading with Finance” and “Negotiation Mastery”.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    1 Describe the economic importance and concepts of international entrepreneurship in theory and practice, and how entrepreneurship relates to innovation in a globalised environment.
    2 Identify the attitudes, values, characteristics, behaviours, and processes associated with successful international entrepreneurship and describe the role of the entrepreneur in creating value with international activity.
    3 Describe and analyse the ways in which entrepreneurs identify opportunity internationally, communicate value, manage risk and access funding.
    4 Evaluate challenges in application of international entrepreneurial activities arising from domestic and international legal, social, political, economic, ethical, and cultural issues and design appropriate responses to these challenges for entrepreneurial value creation.
    5 Identify new international business opportunities for value creation.
    6 Design ways to acquire knowledge, partnerships, and networks and build alliances for creating value internationally.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,2,3,4,5,6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1,2,3,4,5,6
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    3,6
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1,2,3,4,5,6
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    4,6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    2
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    The majority of course content (text, video and discussions) is delivered via Canvas (MyUni), the learning management system. All students are required to work through Modules 1 to 9, completing quizzes and answering dialogue questions.

    In-depth readings will supplement the course content (text, video and discussions) delivered online via Canvas and a linked reading list will be made available via Module 0 in Canvas shortly after course commencement. Optional readings are a good resource for students seeking additional information. 

    Although no text book is required, the following text is highly recommended: Read, S, Sarasvathy, S, Dew, N & Wiltbank, R, 2017, Effectual Entrepreneurship, second edition, London, Routledge.

    Recommended Resources
    Tentative Reading List

    Amabile, TM 1998, 'How to kill creativity', Harvard Business Review, vol. 76, no. 5, September-October 1998, p. 11.

    Amabile, TMK, Mukti 2008, 'Creativity and the role of the leader', Harvard Business Review, vol. 86, no. 10, October 2008, p. 10.

    Anonymous 1997, 'Risk management at the heart of good corporate governance', Management Accounting (British), vol. 75, no. 1, p. 24.

    Chandler, GN, Detienne, DR, McKelvie, A & Mumford, TV 2011, 'Causation and effectuation processes: A validation study', Journal of Business Venturing, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 375-390.

    Chesbrough, H 2010, 'Business Model Innovation: Opportunities and Barriers', Long Range Planning, vol. 43, no. 2/3, pp. 354-363.

    Chowdhury, S 2005, 'Demographic diversity for building an effective entrepreneurial team: is it important?', Journal of Business Venturing, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 727-746.

    Churchill, NC & Lewis, VL 1983, 'The five stages of small business growth', Harvard Business Review, vol. 61, p. 30.

    Dimitratos, P, Johnson, J, Slow, J & Young, S 2003, 'Micromultinationals:: New Types of Firms for the Global Competitive Landscape', European Management Journal, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 164-174.

    Frederick, HHa 2016, Entrepreneurship : theory, process, practice, Edition 4 / Howard Frederick, Allan O' Connor & Donald F. Kuratko. edn, eds Aa Connor & DFa Kuratko, South Melbourne, Victoria : Cengage Learning.

    Harper, DA 2008, 'Towards a theory of entrepreneurial teams', Journal of Business Venturing, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 613-626.

    Levitt, T 1963, 'Creativity is Not Enough', Harvard Business Review, vol. 41, no. 3, p. 72.

    Liesch, P, Welch, L & Buckley, P 2011, 'Risk and Uncertainty in Internationalisation and International Entrepreneurship Studies', Manag Int Rev, vol. 51, no. 6, pp. 851-873.

    Ma, H 1999, 'Creation and preemption for competitive advantage', Management Decision, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 259-267.

    Martin, R 2007, 'How successful leaders think', Harvard Business Review, vol. 85, no. 6, p. 60.

    Martin, RL 2010, 'The execution trap. Drawing a line between strategy and execution almost guarantees failure', Harvard Business Review, vol. 88, no. 7-8, p. 64.

    Mauzy, JH 2006, 'Managing Personal Creativity', Design Management Review, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 64-72.

    McDougall, P, Oviatt, B & Shrader, R 2003, 'A Comparison of International and Domestic New Ventures', Journal of International Entrepreneurship, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 59-82.

    Muzychenko, O & Liesch, PW 2015, 'International opportunity identification in the internationalisation of the firm', Journal of World Business, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 704-717.

    Norbäck, PJ & Persson, L 2014, 'Born to be Global and the Globalisation Process', World Economy, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 672-689.

    O'Connor, AY, Shahid 2011, 'Innovation and entrepreneurship: managing the paradox of purpose in business model innovation', Int. J. of Learning and Intellectual Capital, vol. 8, no. 3.

    Read, S, Sarasvathy, S, Dew, N & Wiltbank, R, 2017, Effectual Entrepreneurship, second edition, London, Routledge.

    Reed, R, Storrud-Barnes, S & Jessup, L 2012, 'How open innovation affects the drivers of competitive advantage; Trading the benefits of IP creation and ownership for free invention', Management Decision, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 58-73.

    Riccò, R & Guerci, M 2014, 'Diversity challenge: An integrated process to bridge the ‘implementation gap’', Business Horizons, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 235-245.

    Sarasvathy, SD 2005, 'What makes entrepreneurs entrepreneurial?', University of Virginia Darden School Foundation, Charlottesville, Virginia.

    Slater, SF, Weigand, RA & Zwirlein, TJ 2008, 'The business case for commitment to diversity', Business Horizons, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 201-209.

    Sosna, M, Trevinyo-Rodríguez, RN & Velamuri, SR 2010, 'Business Model Innovation through Trial-and- Error Learning: The Naturhouse Case', Long Range Planning, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 383-407.

    Stanford-Design-School 2013, 'Bootcamp Bootleg', Stanford Design School, <https://dschool.stanford.edu/resources/the-bootcamp-bootleg >.

    Taplin, R & Nowak, AZ 2010, Intellectual property, innovation and management in emerging economies / edited by Ruth Taplin and Alojzy Z. Nowak, London ; New York : Routledge, London ; New York.

    Teece, DJ 2010, 'Business Models, Business Strategy and Innovation', Long Range Planning, vol. 43, no. 2/3, pp. 172-194.
    Online Learning
    Canvas, the Learning Management System, is the center of online learning for this course. The course content (text, video and discussions) includes links to relevant online resources outside of Canvas.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is offered in a blended learning mode with face to face lectures as intensives and additional resources and activities available online.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The University expects full-time students (i.e. those taking 12 units per semester) to devote a total of 48 hours per week to their studies. This means that you are expected to commit approximately 9 hours for a three-unit course or 13 hours for a four-unit course, of private study outside of your regular classes.
    Learning Activities Summary
    The learning activities in this course are outlined at the beginning of each module in Canvas, the learning management system.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    No information currently available.

    Assessment Related Requirements
    Assessment Task   Weighting
    Individual Project Individual 24%
    Topic Dialogues Canvas 18%
    Group In-Class Exercises Intensives 18%
    Module Quizzes Canvas 18%
    Group In-Class Case Studies Intensives 12%
    Individual Participation 10%
    Total 100%
    Due Dates : Please refer to MyUni

    Students must complete all course assessment requirements and attend all intensives to be eligible to pass the course.
    Assessment Detail
    The assessment components are as follows:
    (Please refer to MyUni for specific topic information)

    Individual Project: “Effectuation in Hand”
    Weighting: 24%
    Due Date:
    Submission Details:
    Each student will submit their work via Canvas. Do not email.
    Create a file name that identifies you as the author ie Assignment1_student_name_studentnumber.docx.

    Task:
    Formulate an idea for a start-up in any industry which you would like to create. Using your results of the exercises from intensives and the other course content (Modules 1 to 9, including design thinking and lean start-up methodology), prepare an integrated document with the following components:

    • Executive Summary
    • A business model canvas (BMC)
    • A list of the major hypotheses, describing their relevance
    • A list of key experiments to test the hypotheses
    • Description of other customer development activities
    • Any relevant appendices and/or attachments to document market size, opportunity background, etc.

    Scope:
    M-02 - The Entrepreneur
    M-03 - Risk, Uncertainty and the Entrepreneur
    M-04 - Finding and Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities
    M-05 - Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship
    M-06 - Globalisation and International Entrepreneurship

    Length and Presentation:
    A summarising text document in MS Word format (to allow commenting) and any other relevant attachments such as spreadsheets, presentation slides, images, audio or video files. The core document (not including attachments or appendices) is not to exceed 2,000 words.

    Marking Criteria:
    Applying critical thinking and being insightful, concise and complete is more important than the word count.

    Learning objectives:
    2 - 6

    Topic Dialogues
    Weighting: The total weighting of Topic Dialogues is 18%.
    Due Date:
    Each full module must be completed to move on to the next module, which cannot be accessed until their set opening dates. In preparation for engaging intensive sessions in which all students share a minimum level of knowledge, the due dates for modules are set in advance of the corresponding intensive session.

    Submission Details:
    Student responses to discussion questions will be captured by Canvas, the Learning Management System and will be made available to other students in the cohort. As such, care is to be taken to not include sensitive, disrespectful or otherwise damaging content.

    Task: Students are to complete all readings and view all videos presented in each Canvas module. This content is the basis for discussion questions in which students are required to give a short response of usually several sentences. Upon submission of their response to the discussion question, students are expected to review the responses of others in the cohort and where relevant, make constructive comments, pose additional questions or otherwise engage in respectful further discussion.

    Scope: All modules of the course will be included in the Topic Dialogues score.

    Length and Presentation:
    Most discussion question responses will be short (several sentences).

    Marking Criteria:
    The quality, insightfulness and synthesis of course content with personal and professional experience will enrich the learning experience for all students.

    Learning objectives:
    1 to 6

    Group In-Class Exercises (6 Intensives)
    Weighting: With each session of Group Exercises contributing 3%, the total of all group exercises will be 18%
    Due Date: Each group exercise will be due at midnight the same day as the intensive.

    Submission Details:
    Each group will submit their work via Canvas during the intensive session.

    Task: Each group exercise will be unique and introduced during the intensive session. Groups will be given a specific task to complete for submission via Canvas.

    Scope:
    Effectuation: Heuristics of Expert Entrepreneurs (M2)
    Risk, Uncertainty & Decision Making (M3)
    Lean Startup Methodology, Business Model Canvas (M4)
    Creativity & Innovation (M5); International Entrepreneurship (M6)
    Venture Scaling & Transitioning (M8)
    Social Entrepreneurship (M9)

    Length and Presentation:
    A short text document in MS Word format (to allow commenting) of a specific length (related to the nature of the Group Exercise).

    Marking Criteria:
    Demonstration of relevant learning objectives and graduate attributes.

    Learning objectives
    1 to 6


    Module Quizzes
    Weighting: With each Quiz contributing 2%, the total of all Quizzes will be 18%
    Due Date: Each Module Quiz is made available to the student via Canvas upon completion of the respective module.
    Submission Details:
    Student responses to quiz questions will be automatically captured and scored by Canvas, the Learning Management System.

    Task: Completion of specific multiple choice and/or true/false questions on the content of each module.

    Scope: Each Quiz will only cover the content of the specific module.
    M-01 - Understanding Entrepreneurship
    M-02 - The Entrepreneur
    M-03 - Risk, Uncertainty and the Entrepreneur
    M-04 - Finding and Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities
    M-05 - Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship
    M-06 - Globalisation and International Entrepreneurship
    M-07 - Entrepreneurship and Teams
    M-08 - Structures for Venture Control & Transitioning
    M-09 - Social Entrepreneurship

    Length and Presentation
    Five to 10 questions per Quiz.

    Marking Criteria:
    Correct or incorrect answers.

    Learning objectives
    1 to 6


    Case Studies
    Weighting: With each Case Study contributing 2%, the total of all Case Studies
    will be 12%

    Due Date: Each group exercise will be due at midnight the same day as the intensive.

    Submission Details:
    Each group will submit their work via Canvas during the intensive session.

    Task: Each Case Study will be unique and introduced during the intensive session. Groups will be given a specific task to complete for submission via Canvas.

    Scope: Each of the Case Studies will focus on a specific course module, namely:
    Effectuation: Heuristics of Expert Entrepreneurs (M2)
    Risk, Uncertainty & Decision Making (M3)
    Lean Startup Methodology, Business Model Canvas (M4)
    Creativity & Innovation (M5); International Entrepreneurship (M6)
    Venture Scaling & Transitioning (M8)
    Social Entrepreneurship (M9)

    Length and Presentation:
    A short text document in MS Word format (to allow commenting) of a specific length (related to the nature of the Case Study).

    Marking Criteria:
    Demonstration of relevant learning objectives and graduate attributes.

    Learning objectives:
    1 to 6


    Individual Participation
    Weighting: The total weighting of Individual Participation is 10%.
    Due Date: Ongoing

    Task: Students are expected to fully participate in all individual and group activities throughout the duration of the course. Participation will be evaluated based on students’ preparedness, engagement and interaction.

    Scope: This assessment will assess understanding of the course content presented and effort applied.

    Marking Criteria:
    The quality, insightfulness and synthesis of course content with personal and professional experience will enrich the learning experience for all students.

    Learning objectives
    1 to 6
    Submission
    All text based assignments must be submitted via the online course site. Please submit documents in a PDF format.
    All text based assignments must be submitted via MyUni. Please refer to step by step instructions:
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/tutorials/

    Presentation of Assignments
    • Please must retain a copy of all assignments submitted.
    • Please include as your first page an ‘Assignment Cover Sheet’, which is signed and dated by you before submission.
    • All group assignments must be attached to a ‘Group Assignment Cover Sheet’, which must be signed and dated by all group members before submission. All team members are expected to contribute approximately equally to a group assignment.

    Lecturers can refuse to accept assignments, which do not have a signed acknowledgement of the University’s policy on plagiarism.

    Assignment Guidelines including Referencing Details
    A copy of the Postgraduate Programs: Communication Skills Guide will have been given to you at the beginning of your program. This guide will assist you structure your assignments. A copy of the guide can also be downloaded fromhttp://www.business.adelaide.edu.au/current/mba/download/2009MBACommSkillsGuide.pdf

    This publication also provides guidelines on a range of other important communication skills including writing essays and management reports, making oral presentations etc.
    In preparing any written piece of assessment for your postgraduate studies it is important to draw on the relevant ‘literature’ to support critical analysis. Also essential is to reference the literature used. Correct referencing is important because it identifies the source of the ideas and arguments that you present, and sometimes the source of the actual words you use, and helps to avoid the problem of plagiarism. (Further information on plagiarism is provided later in this course outline.)
    The Harvard system is widely used in the Business School. Guidelines for the use of this style of referencing can be found in the Communication Skills Guide.

    Further assistance with referencing is available from the Faculty’s Learning Support Advisors. The contact details are provided on page 6 of the Communication Skills Guide.

    Late Assignment Submission
    Students are expected to submit their work by the due date to maintain a fair and equitable system. Extensions will generally only be given for medical or other serious reasons. All requests for extensions must be emailed to the lecturer in charge of the course before the due date. Each request will be assessed on its merits. A late assignment (without prior arrangement) will be penalised by a 5% mark reduction for each day that it is late. Assignments handed in after 14 days from the due submission date will fail even if a 100% mark is granted for the work.

    Return of Assignments
    Lecturer’s aim to mark and return assignments to students within two (2) weeks of the due date with written feedback. Students are responsible for collecting their marked assignments from either their tutorials or lectures. If assignments aren’t collected after two (2) weeks, the assignments will be available at the Student Hub for two (2) weeks. The remaining assignments will only be posted out to the students, if the correct mailing addresses are on the assignments.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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