EDUC 6553 - Assessment and Evaluation in Education

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

Assessment and evaluation are key directors of education, and are pivotal to learning and teaching. Assessment is the process of making a judgement or measurement of worth of an entity, example person or process. Evaluation in education involves gathering and evaluating data evolving from planned learning activities, delivery of instructions and/or programs. This course examines the purposes, paradigms and types of assessment and evaluation used in education, and in particular the innovations associated with them. Their roles in directing learning, provision of feedback to students, feedback strategies to enhance the delivery of instructions and curriculum evaluation, and ensuring standards are achieved are explored. Emerging alternative assessment and reporting processes and the underlying philosophies of selected curricula models/frameworks are highlighted. Specifically, the roles of learners/students, teachers/educators, curriculum designers and administrators/policy makers in assessment and evaluation are discussed.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code EDUC 6553
    Course Assessment and Evaluation in Education
    Coordinating Unit School of Education
    Term Semester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact 2 hr Lecture, 1 hr Tutorial
    Course Description Assessment and evaluation are key directors of education, and are pivotal to learning and teaching. Assessment is the process of making a judgement or measurement of worth of an entity, example person or process. Evaluation in education involves gathering and evaluating data evolving from planned learning activities, delivery of instructions and/or programs.
    This course examines the purposes, paradigms and types of assessment and evaluation used in education, and in particular the innovations associated with them. Their roles in directing learning, provision of feedback to students, feedback strategies to enhance the delivery of instructions and curriculum evaluation, and ensuring standards are achieved are explored. Emerging alternative assessment and reporting processes and the underlying philosophies of selected curricula models/frameworks are highlighted. Specifically, the roles of learners/students, teachers/educators, curriculum designers and administrators/policy makers in assessment and evaluation are discussed.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Edward Palmer

    Edward Palmer
    Email edward.palmer@adelaide.edu.au
    Work Phone 83136036
    Office Location Room 6.23 Nexus 10
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Week 1: Introductions and discussion about assessment tasks
    Week 2: Types of Assessment. A brief history of Assessment
    Week 3: Reliability and Validity. Rubric design. Class feedback
    Week 4: Blooms taxonomy and other frameworks to assist design
    Week 5: Assessment Design: Multiple Choice Questions and other selected response types
    Week 6: Assessment Design: Short answer, essays and other constructed response types
    Week 7: Assessment Design: Reflection type assessments
    Week 8: Assessment Design: Assignment feedback and discussion. Authentic Assessment
    Week 9: Evaluation: Evaluation methodologies
    Week 10: Peer Assessment
    Week 11: Standardised Assessments
    Week 12: Peer Assessment 2
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    The course introduces broad concepts, theories and practices in assessment and evaluation in education (and human sciences). The course provides theoretical, collaborative-dialogue and hands-on sessions, and to achieve the following objectives and outcomes:

    1. Be able to understand and appreciate the roles of (and terminologies in) assessment and evaluation in education (and human sciences);

    2. Evaluate and critique the types of assessment and its importance in learning;

    3. Design assessment appropriate to a variety of learning contexts, and the pertinence of utility issues (validity, reliability, bias, bandwidth and fidelity);

    4. Utilise the various forms of assessment in learning contexts, and evaluate the appropriateness of rubrics, standards, benchmarks and cut-off scores;

    5. Understand and apply the forms of feedback, diagnostics, remediation, extension and reporting;

    6. Understand and evaluate current international literature and reports on assessment and evaluation, and its applications for unit/school/institution/organisation;

    7. Develop and propose evaluation (and associated research) for enhancing learning, teaching, curriculum, performance and support;

    8. Report on emerging assessment and evaluation processes for/in/of learning and through the use of information and communication technologies; and

    9. Understand the developments in adaptive learning and assessment systems, and fundamentals of test-theories and psychometrics.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2, 3, 4, 7, 8
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 2, 3, 6, 8, 9
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 2, 4, 7, 8
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 3, 8, 9
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1, 3, 5, 6, 9
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 2, 4, 5, 6, 9
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 4, 6, 8
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Class based and online activities
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The workload for this course is for a complete 3 point course. 156 hours for the semester. There will be 2 hr classes each week. 
    Learning Activities Summary
    Classroom activities
    Presentations
    Discussion Board tasks
    Assessment tasks

    Specific Course Requirements
    None
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Research into assessment types. Forms part of in class activities and assignment 1
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    1. A group work activity where you will each choose one assessment type and research it using at least 3 references (20%).
    You will then combine all of your individual work and come to some conclusions about the places of each of the assessments in the context of your own teaching and present it in class (20%)


    2. An assessment design appropriate to the teaching contexts within which you will be working. The outcome should be a series of assessments that will be of practical use to you. Accompanied by a report and supported by the literature (at least 10 references) this would form a major component of the assessment. (35%)
    An integral part of this assignemnt is a peer assessment exercise where you would critically evaluate the assessment of 2 fellow students.  (50%)


    3. Contribution to discussion boards (10%)
    Assessment Detail
    Potential Assessment 1 Rubric

    Criteria

    points

    unsatisfactory

    satisfactory

    good

    excellent

     

    Individual content

    /12 points

    Assessment type adequately described

    Assessment type clearly defined and described (7-8)

     

     

    Clear description of assessment type and its effectiveness (9-10)

     

    Clear description of assessment type with analysis of why it is effective in a particular context (11-12)

    Find & Generate 

    Find and generate needed information/data using appropriate methodology

    Evaluate & Reflect 

    Determine and critique the degree of credibility of selected sources, information and of data generated, and reflect on the research processes used

    /8 points

    Less than 3 correctly cited references for each assessment type

     

    References not from credible sources

    3 references for each assessment type

     

     

    References are from credible and appropriate sources

     

    3 or more correctly cited references for each assessment type

     

     

    References from credible and appropriate sources that are relevant to content

     

    3 or more highly relevant and correctly cited references for each assessment type. There are clear links as to how they support content

     

     

    All references are from credible and appropriate sources and are highly relevant to the content

     

    Embark and Clarify

     

    /12 points

    Introductory paragraph does not provide a clear sense of purpose for the document

     

    Little to no use of data from references

     

    Insufficient link between assessment and teaching contexts

     

    Conclusions not drawn or not based on evidence

    Introductory paragraph provides some sense of purpose for the document

     

    Report largely restates original data with minimal integration across sources

     

    Examples are cited where assessment types could be used

     

    Conclusions have some links to evidence

    Introductory paragraph provides clear sense of purpose for the document

     

    Report presents integrated ideas/ data but the overall theme closely resembles that of original sources

     

    Personal examples given that compare and justify appropriate teaching contexts for assessment types

     

    Interprets experiential and research evidence to draw conclusions

    Introductory paragraph provides clear sense of purpose for the document and this is supported by the rest of the document

     

    Report incorporates paraphrasing of data/ideas and presents “new” interpretations/ context from that of original source(s)

     

    Assessment types draw clearly on evidence to compare and contrast in terms of purpose and appropriateness against personal teaching contexts

     

    Experiential and research evidence

    are expertly used to draw conclusions

    Organise & Manage 

    Organise information and data to reveal patterns and themes, and manage teams and research processes

    /8 points

    Hard to follow, incoherent

    Poor organization and transitions

     

    Frequent language errors which impede understanding.

    Identifiable structure, clear introduction, body, and conclusion but weak transitions

     

    Occasional language errors which impede understanding.

    Well organized, with clear connections made to smoothly transition introduction, body, and conclusion

     

    Only minor language errors.

    Well organised and developed and logical, sophisticated and coherent development of clearly connected ideas

     

    Effective and accurate use of grammatical structures and spelling.



    For assignment 2 the first criteria will be replaced by the following

    Assessment Design

    /12 points

    Context of assessment inadequately described

     

    Assessment is poorly designed with grammatical and structural errors. No solutions or feedback supplied nor any supporting material such as rubrics

     

    The assessment is not appropriate for the stated context

     

    Context of assessment adequately described

     

    Assessment is adequately designed but may have grammatical and structural errors. Solutions or feedback supplied may be inadequate or unsuitable as may supporting material such as rubrics

     

    The assessment is appropriate for the stated context

     

    Context of assessment described clearly

     

    Assessment is well designed with few grammatical and structural errors. Solutions or feedback supplied are both appropriate and mostly complete. Supporting material such as rubrics is well designed/sourced and appropriate with few errors

     

    The assessment is appropriate for the stated context and it’s use is supported by examples

     

    Context of assessment described clearly

     

     

    Assessment is well designed with few grammatical and no structural errors. Solutions or feedback supplied are both appropriate and complete. Supporting material such as rubrics is well designed/sourced and highly relevant

     

    The assessment is appropriate for the stated context and it’s use is supported by examples and research literature

     

     






     Discussion Board Rubric (red indicates double points for this section)

    criteria 

    Unsatisfactory 

    Satsifactory 

    Highly Satisfactory 

    Frequency 

    Minimal contributions with less than one post per fortnight 

    Consistent contribution to the discussion board with at least one timely post per week 

    Regular postings  with more than one post per week occurring in a timely fashion  

    Quality 

    Posts typically repeat previous points or are of the “me too” variety 

     

    Little or no evidence of positive contribution towards discussion progression or development

     

    Little support for or iterative interaction with other class members 

    Posts typically add new meaning or information to the discussion 

     

    Posts typically add positive direction to the development of the discussion 

     

    Posts are supportive and offer assistance or direct responses to questions posed by class members 

    Posts typically add additional dimensions to discussion points 

     

    Posts are reflective in nature and provide stimulus to the discussion with occasional use of research literature 

     Posts are always supportive of the discussion and provide leadership on key points

     

    Submission
    All submissions are to be online
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.