GEOG 2138 - Population and Health

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2019

This course is aimed at introducing students to geographical and demographic perspectives in the study of health. It is concerned with providing students with the empirical knowledge, theoretical background and analytical studies to understand the linkages between the distribution and determinants of health related states and environment in populations. Such analyses involve both the examination of variations between different types of groups, socio-economic, ethnic, etc., and between different spatial areas with differing environmental characteristics and problems. There will be a particular focus on migration and health. While there is a focus on the Australian situation in the course students will also be introduced to some of the major population and health issues in Asia. There will not only be an emphasis on examination of health and disease patterns in populations but also on planning the interventions needed to address health problems.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOG 2138
    Course Population and Health
    Coordinating Unit Geography, Environment and Population
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of Level I undergraduate study
    Incompatible GEST 2038, GEST 2016 or GEST 3016
    Course Description This course is aimed at introducing students to geographical and demographic perspectives in the study of health. It is concerned with providing students with the empirical knowledge, theoretical background and analytical studies to understand the linkages between the distribution and determinants of health related states and environment in populations. Such analyses involve both the examination of variations between different types of groups, socio-economic, ethnic, etc., and between different spatial areas with differing environmental characteristics and problems. There will be a particular focus on migration and health. While there is a focus on the Australian situation in the course students will also be introduced to some of the major population and health issues in Asia. There will not only be an emphasis on examination of health and disease patterns in populations but also on planning the interventions needed to address health problems.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Yan Tan

    Dr Dianne Rudd (course coordinator)
    Ground Level Napier Building, Room G34, Phone 831 34109
    Email: dianne.rudd@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Two-hour lecture
    One-hour tutorial

     
    Lectures

    Wednesdays 12noon – 2pm, Benham G10, Benham Lecture Theatre

    NOTE: Tutorials start in Week 2.

     
    Consultation Time: Thursdays 9:00–11:00am. I will be available in my office during
    this time.

    Any other times are by appointment only. Please feel free to arrange a meeting after class or by phone or email.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to establish:

    1.     An understanding of the demographic and geographical perspectives in the study of population health;

    2.     An understanding of the theoretical background and empirical knowledge to examine the linkages between the distribution and determinants of health, fertility and mortality in the world populations;

    3.     An understanding of health and healthcare variations between different sub-groups of the population in Australia and also in other parts of the world.

    4.     An ability to employ analytical tools to examine the patterns of disease and health and the allocation of health resources and the location of health services.

    5.     An ability to assess health policy in Australia at national, state and regional levels which can impinge upon the health and well-being of sub-groups of the population.

    6.     An ability to address the issues relating to migration, climate change and health and develop critical thinking and high quality written skills.

    7.     An ability to interpret health and disease patterns and suggest effective policy and interventions to address health problems for future planning – problem-solving skills.

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    ·      There is no prescribed text for this course as there is no one textbook that deals withboth the demographic and geographical aspects in the study of population health.  

    ·      There are bodies of research on population health and numerous data sources widely available.

    ·      All the required readings, which include a suite of articles on the subject, will be made available through MyUni/Canvas for students’ easy access.

    ·      All other required material (e.g. lecture slides, assessment information, web links) is also provided on MyUni/Canvas.

    Recommended Resources
    Access to computer and ability to obtain data and publications through a range of useful websites including the following useful websites.
     
    Useful websites

    1.    The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). https://www.aihw.gov.au

    2.    The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS): providing data and publications relating to the content of the Australian population census and other information relating to surveys and data sources. http://www.abs.gov.au

    3.    The Population Reference Bureau (PRB): gathering and supplying statistics necessary for studies that address the environment, and health and structure of populations. It covers a range of health domains including Environment, HIV/AIDS, Population Trends, Fertility, Mortality, and Reproductive Health. https://www.prb.org

    4.    World Health Organisation (WHO): WHO is a specialised agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health. It collates  enormous data on communicable diseases, in particular HIV/AIDS, Ebola, malaria and tuberculosis, and data on non-communicable diseases including sexual and reproductive health, development, and aging. Its publications also include topics on nutrition, food security and healthy eating, occupational health, and substance abuse. http://www.who.int/en


    Online Learning
    MyUni/Canvas

    MyUni/Canvas is a critical learning tool and means of communication and knowledge exchange in this course. Learning materials are available for each week in preparation for our lectures and tutorials. Other course material (e.g. readings, assessment information) and
    many features of MyUni/Canvas (e.g. announcements and the discussion board) will help students to organise and manage their study. Announcements will be used regularly, as will group emails to inform students of what is happening.

    Students need to regularly check the MyUni/Canvas website, and use MyUni/Canvas for the different assignments (for information and submission).

    To reach the MyUni website for the course follow the links from the University of Adelaide's Homepage http://www.adelaide.edu.au
    or go straight to https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/. You will need to enter your username and password to enter the MyUni website. If you have difficulty accessing MyUni contact the Help Desk at 830 33335 or send an e-mail to myuni.help@adelaide.edu.au (See http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni; http://www.adelaide.edu.au/its/help/contact_details/).

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The teaching in this course is based on student-centred learning principles and strategies. Students are seen as partners in the learning trajectory. The course employs a blended approach to teaching and learning: face-to-face interactions in class are supplemented by effective use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the online teaching and learning environment of MyUni/Canvas.

    This course will use a mixed method approach consisting of lectures and tutorials. The course lectures will provide fundamental factual information and concepts about population and health issues, introducing demographic analysis, measurement and health resources and access to them. Lectures will be recorded and uploaded to MyUni/ for students to access online.

    Tutorials will encompass discussion, debate, critical thinking and problem solving of complex population health issues, in Australia and globally. Students will have tutorial questions or topics and suggested readings on MyUni/Canvas which need to be read before the tutorials so that the tutorials can be very active and participatory. The tutorials will provide opportunities for students to lead tutorial discussion for a selected topic, present a written list of key points on that set topic, and raise further questions or points of interest for discussions.

    The interactive and collaborative teaching and learning thus takes place inside and outside the classroom. Students learn critical thinking and problem-solving skills and work collaboratively in lectures and tutorials.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The times suggested here are guidelines for students to achieve the course requirements and to successfully complete the course. You will need to allocate appropriate time for your study (structured and self-directed time). University policies suggest for a 3-unit course that there should be a minimum workload of 156 hours of learning activities in the semester.

    ·      Lectures:  2-hour per week

    ·      Tutorials:  1-hour per week

    ·      Reading and preparation:  6 hours per week

    ·      Research and access to MyUni:  2.5 hours per week

    ·      Preparation for assignments:  2 hours per week

    Learning Activities Summary
    Week Lectures Tutorials
    1 Demographic and Epidemiological Transitions: Concepts and Causes;
    Data and Methods for Studying Population and Health

    No Tutorial
    2 Global Health Trends and Challenges;
    An Overview of Australia's Population and Health

    Global health challenges
    3 Reproductive Health;
    Fertility, Mortality and Life Expectancy: Variation in the Australian Population

    Indigenous health in Australia
    4 Ageing Healthily in Australia;
    Future Older South Australians and Demand for Healthcare

    Australian fertility and motility issues
    5 Healthcare Provision in Australia;
    Health Workforce

    Ageing population and health issues
    6 Disability and Aged Care Issues in Australia;
    Social Inequality and Health

    Inequality and health interventions

    7 Applications of GIS in Health;
    Public Health Interventions

    Urban versus rural health outcomes

    8 Family Planning, Ageing and Health in China;
    Internal Migration and Unequal Access to Healthcare in China

    Urban-rural divide, health, and inequality
    9 Migration and Health [I]
    Migration and Health [II]

    Migration and AIDS
    10 Climate Change and Health;
    Climate Extremes: Adaptation in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Communities

    Health and adaptation to climate change
    11 Addressisng the Three-way Nexus Between Migration, Climate Change and Human
    health;
    Tackling the Science-Policy Interface: Paths Forward

    Interactions between
    population, health and the environment;
    Future health policy

    12 Course Review and Exam

    No Tutorial
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    This course is designed to encourage discussion around a number of issues pertaining to population and health in Australia and in other developed and developing countries. The tutorials (including student presentations) will enable students to undertake small group discovery work. The topics set for discussion are tailored to their specific interests. Students can build their skills and lead discussion on a topic of their choice and of policy relevance and importance.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Due Date Learning Objectives
    1. Tutorial attendance & participation      
     
    Formative, summative  10% ongoing 1-7
    2. Tutorial paper (800 word)

    Formative, summative  20% 29 Mar. 2019 1,2,3,5
    3. Research essay: one of 4 set topics (3000 word)          
           
    Summative 30% 17 May 2019 1-7
    4. Final Exam: a 2-hour exam during Semester 1 exam period

    Formative, summative  40% 1-3, 5-7
    Assessment Related Requirements
    To be able to pass the course you need to attend tutorials, complete and submit all assessment requirements described in the course profile for assessment, and sit the exam.

    The Harvard (author-date) referencing system must be used for the written assignments. Your work needs to include references.

    Assessment Detail
    1.    Tutorial Attendance and Participation (10%)

    Tutorials are the forum in which discuss the subject matter and have group work exercises to consolidate the knowledge. Tutorial
    attendance is a compulsory component of the course, and is monitored during the course. You are required to notify the course Coordinator as soon as possible if you have to miss a tutorial. You need written evidence (e.g. medical certificate; note from employer; counsellor’s letter) if you have to miss more than one.  You are assessed on your participation in the class discussions and the small group exercises. Students are expected to be well prepared for each tutorial and to actively participate.

    Students are highly encouraged to attend the course lectures. During the lectures, students have opportunities to undertake a range of learning activities which will be designed to assess ongoing learning of what are the key concepts, data/information sources, methods, and issues addressed throughout the course. Development of oral and aural skills will be an important part of this assessment.


    2. Assignment 1:  Tutorial Paper on one of 4 set topics. Due on Friday, 29 March 2018. 20% of total assessment.


    3. Assignment 2:  Research Essay: One of 4 set topics. Due on Friday, 17 May 2019. 30% of total assessment.

    Students are required to complete a Research Essay on one of 4 set topics. The essay involves includes a literature review section. To do a sound literature review you are expected to reference at least 10 literature sources (journal articles, books). The suggested readings for each week can be used as a starting point but you need to go beyond these. Marking will place an emphasis on quality of argument more than quantity. The preferred referencing system is Harvard (the author-date in text matched with bibliography).

    In assessing the essay credit will be given to students who have read widely, are able to critically assess the reading in terms of the set topic and who are able to support arguments with case studies and, where appropriate as evidence, such as graphs, tables and frameworks. 

     
    4.  Final Exam: A 2-hour exam during Semester 2 exam period. 40% of total assessment.

    Submission
    Submission of all assignments must be lodged by the given DUE date to avoid penalty. To check for plagiarism we use TURNITIN. Last possible time for submission is always midnight on the due date.

    Students will receive feedback on or grades for their work within 2 weeks after the due date of each submission.

    NOTE: Students should retain a copy of their assignments; and keep the receipt for their TURNITIN submissions.

     
    Extensions

    Extensions can only be sought under the provisions of the Modified Arrangements for Coursework Assessment Policy or the Reasonable Adjustments for Teaching and Assessment for Students with a Disability Policy.


    Faculty of Arts Late Assignment Policy

    Assignments submitted after the given due date without reasonable cause (evidence) could be subject to penalties. For work that is late without formal extension, 2 percentage points will be deducted from the mark for every day the work is late to a maximum of 7 days (including weekends and public holidays).

    For example, an assignment that is 5 days late: raw score of 80% - 10 marks lateness deduction = 70% final mark.

    For work with a formal extension, these penalties will apply from the extended due date.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.