COMMERCE 7016OL - Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethics (M)

Online - Quadmester 1 - 2014

This course reflects the major contemporary trends in corporate citizenship, social and environmental responsibility and accountability. Communities and governments now require organisations to be responsible and accountable for their performance in relation to their social and environmental responsibilities, and these responsibilities have increasingly formed part of organisations' ethical values and strategic agendas. This course will include consideration of the enlarged spectrum of corporate stakeholders; corporate social responsibilities, citizenship and reputation; business-government relationships and political environmental management; sustainable development; environmental management and accountability; social investing and corporate philanthropy; community and employee relationships; and public affairs and media management. Accordingly, this course focuses on understanding and implementing enhanced organisational performance that includes social, environmental and ethical performance indicators in addition to the traditional financial performance indicators.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code COMMERCE 7016OL
    Course Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethics (M)
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Quadmester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s Online
    Units 3
    Course Description This course reflects the major contemporary trends in corporate citizenship, social and environmental responsibility and accountability. Communities and governments now require organisations to be responsible and accountable for their performance in relation to their social and environmental responsibilities, and these responsibilities have increasingly formed part of organisations' ethical values and strategic agendas. This course will include consideration of the enlarged spectrum of corporate stakeholders; corporate social responsibilities, citizenship and reputation; business-government relationships and political environmental management; sustainable development; environmental management and accountability; social investing and corporate philanthropy; community and employee relationships; and public affairs and media management. Accordingly, this course focuses on understanding and implementing enhanced organisational performance that includes social, environmental and ethical performance indicators in addition to the traditional financial performance indicators.
    Course Staff
    Dr Jeffrey Keddie
    jeffrey.keddie@monash.edu

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    At the end of this course, you will be able to:
    1. Explore the relationship between ethics and business and the subsequent theories of justice and economics across different cultural traditions.
    2. Explain the relationship between ethics, morals and values in the workplace.
    3. Formulate ethical philosophy to explain how it contributes to current practice.
    4. Analyse some of the competing demands on business when scrutinising the ethics of business activity.
    5. Critically apply understanding of ethics to real-world contexts. Gather and analyse information by way of undertaking a research project on a topic relevant to business ethics. 
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 6
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 3, 5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 6
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 3, 5
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Wicks, A.C., Freeman, R.E., Werhane, P.H. and Martin, K.E. (2010). Business Ethics: A
    Managerial Approach. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ. ISBN 13:978-0-13-142792-1

    List assigned articles and resources by week. This does not include assigned textbook readings.
    W1  Chapter 1: Ethical Reasoning and Marketing Decisions – Murphy et al (2005) Solomon, R. C. (2009) ‘It’s Good Business’, in Shaw, H., Barry, V. & Sansbury, G. Moral Issues in Business (Asia-Pacific edn.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning, pp. 37-46.
    W2 Kohlberg, L. & Hersh, R. (1977) ‘Moral development: A review of the theory’, Theory into Practice, 16, pp. 53-59.
    Gilligan, C. (1982) ‘Woman’s Place in Man’s Life Cycle’, in In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory in Women’s Development. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press, pp. 5-23.
    W3 Norton, T. (1992) ‘The Narcissism and Moral Mazes of Corporate Life: A Commentary on the writings of H. Schwartz and R. Jackall’, Business Ethics Quarterly, 2(1), 75-81.
    W4 Crane, A. & Matten, D. (2010) Business Ethics: Managing Corporate Citizenship and Sustainability in the Age of Globalization. (3rd edn.). Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 91-104.
    Hardin, G. (1974) ‘Lifeboat ethics: The case against helping the poor’, Psychology Today, September, pp. 38 & 40-43.
    W5 Chapter 5: “Corporate Social Responsibility” in Hartman and Des Jardines (eds) Business Ethics: Decision-Making for Personal Integrity MgGraw-Hill_Irwin (2010):
    5-1”Rethinking the Social Responsibility of Business: A Reason Debate Featuring Milton Friedman, Whole Food’s John Mackey and Cypress Semiconductor’s T.J. Rodgers. 5-2 “Does it Pay to Be Good?” A.J. Vogl
    W6 Friedman, M. (1970) “The social responsibility of business is to increase its profits”, New York Times Magazine, 13 September.
    Freeman, R. E. (2009) ‘Managing for Stakeholders’, in Beauchamp, T. L., Bowie, N. E. & Arnold, D. G. (2009) Ethical Theory and Business. (8th edn.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall, pp. 56-68.
    Lawrence, A.T. & Weber, J. (2008) ‘Shell Oil in Nigeria’ in Lawrence, A.T. & Weber, J. Business and Society: Stakeholders, Ethics, Public Policy. (12th edn.). New York: McGraw-Hill Irwin, pp. 520-530.
    W7 Maitland, I. (2005) ‘The Great Non-Debate over International Sweatshops’, in Hartman, L. P. Perspectives in Business Ethics. (3rd edn.). Boston: McGraw-Hill, pp. 476-513.
    Lee, M. & Ruhe, J. (1999) ‘Ethical mindsets of Christianity and Confucianism: A comparative study’, International Journal of Value-Based Management, 12, pp. 13-27
    W8 Rice, G. (1999) ‘Islamic ethics and the implications for business’ Journal of Business Ethics, 18, pp. 345-358.
    Weber, M. (2002) ‘The Protestant ethic and “spirit” of capitalism’ in The Protestant ethic and the ‘spirit’ of capitalism and other writings (eds. Baehr, P. & Wells, G. C.). New York: Penguin Books
    Weber, M. (2002) ‘The Protestant ethic and “spirit” of capitalism’ in The Protestant ethic and the ‘spirit’ of capitalism and other writings (eds. Baehr, P. & Wells, G. C.). New York: Penguin Books.
    Lee, M. & Ruhe, J. (1999) ‘Ethical mindsets of Christianity and Confucianism: A comparative study’, International Journal of Value-Based Management, 12, pp.13-27



    Recommended Resources
    Recommended Journals include:
    • Business Ethics Quarterly
    • Journal of Business Ethics
    • Business and Society
    • Business and Society Review
    • Economics and Philosophy 
    Online Learning
    Each week’s module is accessible via the LEARN site. Each module contains an overview of the week’s content, links to the week’s lecture and cases (on those weeks where cases are included), and tutorial and case discussion forums.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

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    Workload

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    Learning Activities Summary

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  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

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    Assessment Detail

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    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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  • Policies & Guidelines
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