GEOG 2134 - Resource Scarcity and Allocation

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2017

The course examines how society makes decisions about the allocation of scarce and uncertain resources when human desires for the use of the resources are limitless. The course first discusses resource allocation criteria that can be considered when natural resource (re)allocation policies, projects or plans are evaluated. The course then introduces some basic economic concepts and principles (eg opportunity cost, marginal analysis and property rights) that serve as a tool to analyse and evaluate resource allocation options. The primary concern of the course is over the interpersonally, intertemporally efficient allocation of non-renewable and renewable natural resources, including water resources, minerals, energy resources and forests, in an Australian context. The course also considers social justice and ecological sustainability in the exploitation of natural resources.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOG 2134
    Course Resource Scarcity and Allocation
    Coordinating Unit Geography, Environment and Population
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of level 1 undergraduate study
    Incompatible GEST 2034, GEST 2021 or GEST 3021
    Course Description The course examines how society makes decisions about the allocation of scarce and uncertain resources when human desires for the use of the resources are limitless. The course first discusses resource allocation criteria that can be considered when natural resource (re)allocation policies, projects or plans are evaluated. The course then introduces some basic economic concepts and principles (eg opportunity cost, marginal analysis and property rights) that serve as a tool to analyse and evaluate resource allocation options. The primary concern of the course is over the interpersonally, intertemporally efficient allocation of non-renewable and renewable natural resources, including water resources, minerals, energy resources and forests, in an Australian context. The course also considers social justice and ecological sustainability in the exploitation of natural resources.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jungho Suh

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Demonstrate a sound understanding of the economically adopted paradigms about the efficient and sustainable use of natural resources.
    2 Identify principal criteria for designing and evaluating natural resource management schemes.
    3 Evaluate the competing uses of natural resources (e.g. forests, fresh water, fisheries, non-renewable resources).
    4 Critically analyse natural resource management policies, by way of various case studies.
    5 Present logical and coherent written arguments based on evidence.
    6 Communicate ideas through class participation.
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Field, B.C. 2016, Natural Resource Economics: An Introduction, 3rd edn, Waveland, Long Grove, Illinois.
    Recommended Resources
    To be advised
    Online Learning
    MyUni will provide you with access to course materials, announcements and many other features to help manage your study. You are advised to regularly visit the MyUni website for the course to receive course announcements and reminders.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Although the lectures are intended to help you understand the key concepts discussed in the textbook, the lectures aim to add value and not just to regurgitate the text. Some material presented in lectures may come from diverse other sources. The lecture PowerPoint slides will be posted, in pdf format, to the course MyUni webpage progressively after lectures. That way, you are free from having to reproduce the material in the Powerpoint slides during lectures. However, much detail will be conveyed to the audience verbally. All material covered in lectures are examinable. Therefore, it is imperative that you attend lectures and take notes.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 2-hour lecture (or equivalent) per week 24 hours per semester
    1 x 1-hour tutorial (or equivalent) per week 12 hours per semester
    3 hours reading per week 36 hours per semester
    4 hours assignment preparation per week 48 hours per semester
    3 hours exam preparation per week 36 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Resource scarcity and allocation criteria
    Week 2 Property rights and resource allocation
    Week 3 Marine fisheries
    Week 4 Forests
    Week 5 Water allocation, pricing and trading
    Week 6 Water allocation, pricing and trading
    Week 7 Agriculture
    Week 8 Biodiversity and wildlife
    Week 9 Minerals / Waste recycling / Energy resources
    Week 10 Community-based natural resource management
    Week 11 Multi-objective decision-support systems
    Week 12 Course summary / Exam preparation
    * The sequence of lectures is subject to change.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    The assessment for the course is based on four components. Your grade will be determined by the aggregate mark that comprises of these components. The following table shows the percentage weightings of the graded work required by the course, and how the assessment activities are linked to the course learning outcomes.
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting (%) Course learning Outcomes
    Tutorial participation Formative and Summative 10 1,2,3,4,5,6
    Academic essay Formative and Summative 40 1,2,3,4,5
    Mid-semester test Summative 10 1,2,3,4,5
    Exam Summative 40 1,2,3,4,5
    Assessment Detail
    Tutorial participation (10%): students are expected to attend and participate in all tutorials.

    2500 word essay (40%): students submit an essay on a chosen topic.

    Mid-semester test (10%): a closed-book written test is held in a tutorial class. Students are required to answer one short essay question for 30 minutes in writing.

    Exam (40%): closed-book exam covering all aspects of the course.
    Submission
    Information available on enrolment.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

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