GEOG 5004 - Environmental Economics and Policy

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2015

This course introduces various environmental policy instruments in response to contemporary local and global environmental problems and discusses the economic concepts and principles embedded in the policy instruments. The course examines conventional command-and-control strategies and an array of pollution control alternatives that are based on market incentives. The course investigates more decentralised approaches including property rights approach, (e.g.community-based environmental management). The course also discusses ecological approaches including precautionary principle and safe minimum standard.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOG 5004
    Course Environmental Economics and Policy
    Coordinating Unit Geography, Environment and Population
    Term Semester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible GEST 5004
    Course Description This course introduces various environmental policy instruments in response to contemporary local and global environmental problems and discusses the economic concepts and principles embedded in the policy instruments. The course examines conventional command-and-control strategies and an array of pollution control alternatives that are based on market incentives. The course investigates more decentralised approaches including property rights approach, (e.g.community-based environmental management). The course also discusses ecological approaches including precautionary principle and safe minimum standard.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jungho Suh

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Generate an understanding of the environmental economics concepts and principles applied in the interplay between economy and the environment.
    2 Develop an understanding of the role of environmental economics in the design of public policies for environmental quality improvement.
    3 Identify principal criteria for evaluating environmental policies.
    4 Develop a sound understanding of various approaches (e.g. command-and-control approach, market-based approach, property rights approach) to mitigating contemporary global and local environmental problems (e.g. air pollution, water pollution, land degradation).
    5 Develop an understanding of public disputation over the choice of environmental policy instruments.
    6 Develop an ability to critically analyse environmental policies in terms of efficiency and equity amongst different stakeholders, by way of various case studies.
    7 Generate a sound understanding of contested views of and pathways to sustainable development.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2, 3, 4, 7
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 3, 4, 5, 6
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 5, 6, 7
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 5, 6, 7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Field, B.C. and Field, M.K. 2013, Environmental Economics: An Introduction, 6th edn, McGraw-Hill Irwin, New York. (Other editions can also be consulted.)
    Recommended Resources
    TBA
    Online Learning
    The MyUni website for the course will provide you with access to course materials, announcements and many other features to help manage your study. You are advised to regularly visit the MyUni website for the course to receive course announcements and reminders.

    You will need the following to access MyUni:

    · a computer with an Internet connection;
    · a PC running Windows 95 or higher or a Mac running Mac OS 8.6 or higher;
    · a JavaScript enabled web browser (Netscape Navigator 4.7 or higher Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher);
    · the Adobe Reader software
    (download from http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html);
    · your University of Adelaide username and password.

    To reach the MyUni website for the course follow the links from the University of Adelaide's Homepage http://www.adelaide.edu.au/ to Login to MyUni https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/webapps/login. When you open the course website you will find material related to the course. You will need to enter a username and password to enter the MyUni website.

    If you have difficulty accessing MyUni contact the Help Desk at 831 33335 or send an e-mail to myuni.help@adelaide.edu.au.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lecture slides will be posted, in pdf format, to the course webpages progressively after the respective lecture is delivered. That way, you are free from having to reproduce the material in the Powerpoint slides during lectures. However, much detail will be conveyed to the audience verbally. No video or audio recording service will be provided for this course. All material covered in lectures are examinable. Therefore, it is imperative for you attend lectures and take notes.

    Each lecture is followed by a workshop-style seminar. The seminars provide an opportunity to explore the ideas, perspectives and issues central to the course, through discussion, debate and collaboration amongst the students in your discussion group.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Lecture and seminar: 3 hours per week
    Lecture material reading: 8 hours per week
    Assignment preparation: 8 hours per week
    Exam preparation: 5 hours per week
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Introduction
    Week 2 Neoclassical views of environmental problems
    Week 3 Design of environmental policy
    Week 4 Command-and-control approach
    Week 5 Market-based approach
    Week 6 Property rights approach
    Week 7 Cap-and-trade approach
    Week 8 TBA
    Week 9 Ecological views of sustainable development
    Week 10 Ecological economics
    Week 11 Green economy and green society
    Week 12 Course summary / Exam preparation
    * The sequence of lectures is subject to change.
    Specific Course Requirements
    It is compulsory for the students to participate in seminars to be held after every lecture unless otherwise notified. You are expected to play an active role in the seminars. This will include taking part in discussions and making brief oral presentations.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    You are expected to play an active role in a workshop discussion group. This will include working through discussion questions, and making brief presentations and taking part in discussions. The discussions will help you be prepared for the end-of-semester examination as well as the ‘academic essay’ assignment.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Activity Weight (%)
    Seminar participation 10
    Academic essays 50
    End-of-semester exam 40
    Total 100
    Assessment Related Requirements
    TBA
    Assessment Detail
    TBA
    Submission
    TBA
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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