GEOG 2147 - Cities in the Developing World

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

Cities in `developing' countries face a range of issues often distinct in nature and scale from cities in `developed' countries. This course provides a focused exploration of cities in the developing world and equips students with the theoretical tools necessary to analyse these issues and the processes which underpin them. This course will examine cities from across the developing world but it will pay particular attention to rapidly urbanising countries such as India and China. The issues discussed will vary from year to year but will include at least four of the following: population growth and urbanisation; housing; urban restructuring and global economic networks; environmental sustainability; transport, access and mobility; location and supply of infrastructure and services.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOG 2147
    Course Cities in the Developing World
    Coordinating Unit Geography, Environment and Population
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Prerequisites 12 units of Level I Humanities/Social Sciences courses
    Incompatible GEST 2047
    Course Description Cities in `developing' countries face a range of issues often distinct in nature and scale from cities in `developed' countries. This course provides a focused exploration of cities in the developing world and equips students with the theoretical tools necessary to analyse these issues and the processes which underpin them. This course will examine cities from across the developing world but it will pay particular attention to rapidly urbanising countries such as India and China. The issues discussed will vary from year to year but will include at least four of the following: population growth and urbanisation; housing; urban restructuring and global economic networks; environmental sustainability; transport, access and mobility; location and supply of infrastructure and services.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Bonham

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    Knowledge

    1. Processes of urbanisation in selected ‘developing’ countries.

    2. Key issues facing cities in the ‘developing’ world.

    3. Current debates on addressing urban issues.

    4. The place of cities in ‘development’.

    5. Theoretical frameworks and key concepts used in studying urbanisation.
     

    Skills

    6. Locate, synthesise and critically engage with urban research.

    7. Ability to identify, locate and analyse primary data sources.

    8. High level written and verbal communication skills including ability to construct and communicate logical and appropriately supported arguments.

    9. Ability to work in a team.



    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 6, 7
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 8, 9
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 3, 4, 5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There are no required text books for this course. All required reading will be uploaded or linked into MyUni.
    Recommended Resources

    Beall, J and S Fox (2009) Cities and Development. London, UK: Routledge.
    Gregory, D (2009) Dictionary of Human Geography Malden, US: Blackwell
    Pacione, M (2009) Urban Geography: A Global Perspective (3rd edition) Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
    Online Learning
    See course homepage on MyUni: https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/ for all course material, announcements, discussion board topics and additional resources.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Primary modes of learning in this course will be interactive lectures, case-study reading (tutorials), facilitated tutorial discussion, assignment research and preparation, on-line discussion board, and peer engagement. Students will be allocated one article/book chapter to read each week and will be required to contribute to discussion on the basis of that reading.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.


     
    Course activities (lectures, tutorials, reading, assignments and on-line tasks) have been created in line with the University of Adelaide policy that students enrolled in 3 Unit courses will spend an average of 12 hours/week or 144 hours per semester engaged in learning related to that course.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Lectures and Tutorials (Scheduling of topics is subject to change)
    Weeks 1 - 2: Overview. Exploring concepts. Examining the relationship between urbanisation and
                        development.
    Weeks 3 - 4: Cities in context - pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial settlement patterns for selected 
                        developing countries.
    Weeks 5 - 12: Key issues. Topics will be selected from the following: urban networks, urbanisation and
                         population change, economic change and globalisation, social and community networks, 
                         urban policies, housing, pollution and waste management, environmental issues,
                         infrastructure, disaster planning and management, mobility, health.
    Specific Course Requirements
    Nil
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Each student will select a city to research in-depth. Throughout the semester they will upload their research findings to relevant Discussion Board Topics. At the end of the semester, the entire class will have the Discussion Board to use as a comparative resource in their final resaerch essay.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    Assignment   No. and Task
    (assignments 1 and 3 are subject to negotiation with students)

    Word Count (equivalent)

    Assessment   type

    Learning   Objectives

    Due   Date
    (To be confirmed)

    Value   %

    Assignment 1. Particaption and
    critical summary.

    1000   (equivalent)

    Summative

    1, 2, 3,   5, 8, 9

    Weekly

    15%

    Assignment 2. Group presentation

    1000   (equivalent)

    Summative

    1, 2, 3,   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

    Student   nominated tutorial

    15%

    Assignment 3. Discussion Board

    2000

    (equivalent)

    Summative

    1, 2, 3,   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

    Contribution   1. 7 April

    Contribution   2. 12 May

    30%

    Assignment 4. Essay

    2500

    Summative

    1, 2, 3,   4, 5, 6, 7, 8

    2 June

    40%

    Assessment Related Requirements

    Students must complete and submit all components of assessment. Students who do not submit and complete all components of assessment will be given a fail grade for the course.


    Students must attend all tutorials. Students will only be excused from attending tutorials on medical or compassionate grounds. Students unable to attend a tutorial must notify the tutor by email prior to the session and provide a medical certificate/statement for compassionate grounds when they return to class. Students who do not attend all tutorials and do not provide reasonable grounds (medical/ compassionate) for non attendance will automatically fail the course.
    Assessment Detail
    Assignment 1.  Participation and critical overview
    Students will be allocated one reading per week and will be required to use that reading as a basis for their contribution to the class discussion. Students will also be required to engage with weekly presentations - asking questions of presenters, providing feedback or elaborating discussion.  

    Criteria for participation
    Attendance at tutorials
    Demonstrated completion of, and engagement with reading
    Demonstrated active listening
    Relevant feedback and questions to presenters, relevant contribution to discussion

    Critical Overview (500 words)
    In the first tutorial, each student will nominate a week to submit a critical overview of the discussion topic. Students will be required to read at least Four (4) articles and synthesise the contribution of each article to the discussion topic.

    Assignment 2. Group presentation
    In the first tutorial, students will nominate a presentation topic (from weekly tutorials) and will work as a team to make the presentation. Students must read all the articles on the reading list for the given topic and are welcome to present additional material based on research into their selected city (see Discussion Board).  

    A presentation is more than simply delivering information. Group members will have a very limited time for their presentation and must identify the key ideas they want to convey to the class and the best way to deliver that information so that it can be easily comprehended by the audience. Students will be marked on the basis of their research, presentation and ability to work in a team. Marks for the presentation will be determined through peer assessment, self-assessment and lecturer assessment. A peer and self-assessment pro-forma will be posted on My Uni.


    Assignment 3. Discussion Board (1000 words per contribution - 2 contributions)
    In the first tutorial, each student will nominate a city that they will research throughout the semester. Students will make two Discussion Board posts about their city - the first in April and the second in May. These posts must be related to the designated Discussion Board themes. For example, students may choose Ambon, Indonesia as their research city and they can choose to upload Discussion Board posts to the Themes of 1) Housing and 2) Waste Management. It is anticipated that by the end of semester the class will have a vast resource on cities around the globe. Importantly, this resource will provide students with insights into how particular issues are being examined and addressed in different parts of the world. This resource can be used by students in their final essay to contrast their own city with other cities.


    Assignment 4. Essay (2500)
    The essay will have a research focus and will extend work undertaken for the Discussion Board. Students will make an argument for what they believe is the 'priority' issue in their chosen city. They should then make a case for how this 'priority' issue is being and should be addressed. Students should use the Discussion Board posts of classmates to contrast 'solutions' implemented in their own and other cities. 

    Marking criteria (a rubric will be posted on MyUni).
    1. Argument and evidence
    2. Literature and critical engagement
    3. Structure
    4. Presentation and style
    Submission
    Submission of Essays
    Essays must be submitted via MyUni - first through Turnitin and then through ICC printed assigments.


    Extensions
    Extensions may be granted on genuine medical or compassionate grounds (supported by appropriate documentation). Students must apply to the course coordinator for an extension in writing (e.g. via email) before the due date.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    No feedback is available. This course is being offered for the first time in 2014.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.