ARTH 5215 - Modern Australian Art

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

This course which focuses on modern Australian art from 1901 to c1970 will be taught around the painting, sculpture, works on paper, decorative arts and photographic works in the collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia. It will include work produced by artists working in Australia; in Britain, France and America as expatriates; and by emigres who came to Australia. It will focus on the moves within modern art to include Indigenous art in our national culture; how work from the AASEAL expedition to Arnhem Land marked the beginnings of Indigenous collections for most Australian galleries; and how women artists were at the forefront of modern art. The course will also explore changes in modern Australia and how there was shift in taste from British-Australian art to engagement with American abstraction. The course will be taught via lectures and 'hands-on' interactive workshops around works of art in the Gallery, and via lectures and tutorials at the university.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ARTH 5215
    Course Modern Australian Art
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Restrictions Available to ProCertArtHist, GradCertArtHist, GradDipArtHist, MA(StArtHist) & MA(Cur&MuseumSt) students only
    Course Description This course which focuses on modern Australian art from 1901 to c1970 will be taught around the painting, sculpture, works on paper, decorative arts and photographic works in the collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia. It will include work produced by artists working in Australia; in Britain, France and America as expatriates; and by emigres who came to Australia. It will focus on the moves within modern art to include Indigenous art in our national culture; how work from the AASEAL expedition to Arnhem Land marked the beginnings of Indigenous collections for most Australian galleries; and how women artists were at the forefront of modern art. The course will also explore changes in modern Australia and how there was shift in taste from British-Australian art to engagement with American abstraction. The course will be taught via lectures and 'hands-on' interactive workshops around works of art in the Gallery, and via lectures and tutorials at the university.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Catherine Speck

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course students should be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of a periods, styles, artists and interpretative contexts relevant to Modern Australian art

    2. synthesise different research approaches and evaluate scholarly perspectives to formulate informed and independent conclusions about art, societies and cultures;

    3. develop a range of approaches to understanding modern Australian art including Indigenous art in that period  

    4. understand specialised art historical terminology and methods and theories

    5. demonstrate competent visual analysis skills

    6. discuss the significance of modern Australian art and art more broadly not only in terms of aesthetics, but also as a useful way to construct arguments, articulate key ideas clearly and communicate intelligibly in written and oral forms of expression

    7. demonstrate effective research sills using library and other information sources in order to define areas of inquiry for the preparation of essays

    8. listen effectively and respectfully to the viewpoints of others; participate actively in a cooperative learning environment in small group tutorial activities and discussions
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1,2,3,4,5,6
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2,4.5,7
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 3,4,6,7,9
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 8,9
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 7,9
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 6,7,8
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 1,8
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 2, 8
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    · Course Handbook – distributed at the first tutorial
    · Course Reader – distributed at the first tutorial
    Recommended Resources
    · Recommended text (available at the Art Gallery of South Australia bookshop or online booksellers)
    · Lecture and tutorial images (on PowerPoint)
    · Barr Smith Library Resource Guide:
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/guide/hum/history/art.html
    Online Learning
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The lectures provide broad discussion of selected topics relevant to the history of contemporary art, which are complemented by focused tutorial case studies centred on oral presentations and group discussion of the prescribed tutorial readings and images. It is essential that students complete the weekly tutorial readings in order to share ideas, interpret subject matter, develop essential analysis skills and work together cooperatively. Material covered in the lectures and tutorials also provides the basic content for the final piece of assessment. 
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The course is composed of eight weeks of university lectures (1 hour, 10 minutes) and tutorials (2 hours) as well as four weeks of gallery sessions (3 hours). Students are required to complete the weekly tutorial readings in advance of the tutorials and complete additional reading for their assessment tasks.
    Learning Activities Summary
    2013 Modern Art Schedule (tentative)
    Schedule
    Week 1 Gallery introduction: Nick Mitzevich and Lisa Slade
    University introduction
    Housekeeping matters - organisation into tutorial groups etc
    Week 2 University: Professor Catherine Speck
    What is Modernism?
    Week 3 University: Professor Catherine Speck
    Fragmented space: cubism, futursim, vorticism
    Week 4 Gallery: Jane Messenger & Julie Robinson
    European Modernism- Jane Messenger The Studio Movement – Robert Reason
    Week 5 University: Professor Catherine Speck
    Dada and surrealism
    Week 6 University: Professor Catherine Speck
    Utopias: Constructivism, suprematism and the Bauhaus
    Mid-Semester Break
    Week 7 Gallery: Robert Reason & Lisa Spade
    European Modernist works on paper – Maria Zagala Modern Decorative Art – Robert Reason
    Week 8 University: Professor Catherine Speck
    Dystopias: expressionism, ‘primitivism’, post World War II abstraction
    Week 9 University: Professor Catherine Speck
    ‘Mechanical ballets: Light, motion and theatre’ kinetic art, op art and happenings
    Week 10 Gallery: Tracey Lock-Weir, Lisa Slade & Nick Mitzevich
    Australian Artists abroad 1880s – 1940s Pop & Conceptualism and broader developments in British and American twentieth century art.
    Week 11 University: Professor Catherine Speck
    British moderns: Hepworth, Moore, Bacon, Nicholson, Epstein, etc.
    Week 12 University: Professor Catherine Speck
    The end of a dream: Minimalism and conceptualism
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
     ASSIGNMENT VALUE LEARNING OBJECTIVES DUE DATE
     Display/Exhibition Review 15% 1,3,4,5
    Slide Test 15% 1,2,3,4,5,6,7
    Tutorial Presentation 10% 1,3,4,5,6,7,8,9
    Tutorial Essay 25% 1,2,3,4,5,6,7
    Research Essay 35% 1,2,3,4,5,6,7
    Assessment Related Requirements
    The due dates for assessment are treated as examination dates. Requests for extension stating the reason for the extension must be sent to your tutor for approval in advance of the due date and supplemented by a hard-copy Extension Request form available on MyUni that must be signed off by both student and tutor.
    Assessment Detail
    Display/Exhibition Review (1000 words)

    Task description:
    Art Gallery display Review
    Date: Friday 29 March 2013
    Select a Gallery in the Melrose Wing (G12-16) that features a least 4 international Modern works. Analyse their display and how the modern works ‘speak’ to those hung nearby.

    Your review should include references to the artists and artworks and any recent critical discussion of the exhibition.

    Weighting: 15%

    Due Date: Friday 29 March 2013.

    Submission: Online Submission of Assignments (e-submission) via MyUni

    All assignments are to be submitted electronically via MyUni – this is a two-step process. The assignment needs to be electronically submitted for marking via the ‘Assignments’ link in the course menu. Marked assignments will be returned to the student in printed form.

    Assignments are due at midday on the due date.

    Slide Test

    Task description: At the end of the course your knowledge of some of the key images covered during the lectures will be examined by a slide test. At each lecture you will be provided with a photocopy listing the salient facts of slides from the lecture. To enable you to familiarise yourself better with these after each lecture, the slides will be on the web at www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au. Prior to the exam you will be given a list of between 25-30 slides and those included in the exam will be drawn from this list.

    The slide test will be held under examination conditions. It consists of four single slides (each of five minutes duration) and two comparisons of two slides each (each of 15 minutes duration). For the former, you are expected to identify the artist, title, medium of each image and date and discuss the images. For the latter, you are also expected to identify the artists, title, medium and date and then to compare the images by discussing their iconography, composition and style.

    Weighting: 15%

    Deadline: Wednesday 12 June 2013, 5.10 – 6.00pm.
    Venue: Napier LG23

    Submission: In class.

    Tutorial (oral) presentation

    Task description: The tutorials are intended as an opportunity to give students to discuss the lecture, the readings for the week and relevant works of art. At the first tutorial you will be asked to choose a tutorial topic and week in which you will present this paper. Relevant works of art are to be included in this 10-minute presentation to the class based on the key points of your written paper. Your tutorial paper is due one week after the presentation.

    Your presentation is primarily a starting point for discussion and it will be more successful if you do not merely repeat the opinion of the authors you have read. Read critically. Do you agree with their ideas? What have others thought of them? Starting points can be found in the readings listed for the weekly topic. Further readings can be found in the bibliography and in database searches conducted in the Barr Smith Library or on-line. Your analysis should also include knowledge of artists and close observation of works of art.

    Weighting: 10%

    Time: 15 minutes (10 minute presentation and 5 minutes for questions and feedback)

    Submission: In class.

    Tutorial Paper (2,500 – 3,000 words)

    Task description: The tutorial essay is focussed on the topic of the tutorial oral presentation.

    Weighting: 25%

    Deadline: The tutorial essay is due one week after the tutorial oral presentation.

    Submission: As above (per Display/Exhibition Review, and below in 5.3).

    Research Essay (3000 – 3,500 words)

    Task description: Research essay topics are based on key themes discussed in the course and are listed in the Course Guide along with a bibliography.

    Weighting: 35%

    Deadline: Wednesday 19 June 2013.

    Submission: As above.
    Submission

    Online Submission of Assignments (e-submission) via MyUni

    All assignments are to be submitted electronically via MyUni. The assignment needs to be electronically submitted for marking via the ‘Assignments’ link in the course menu. Marked assignments will be returned to the student in printed form.

    Assignments are due at midday on the due date.

    Extensions

    The due dates for assessment are treated as examination dates. Requests for extension stating the reason for the extension must be sent to your tutor for approval in advance of the due date and supplemented by a hard-copy Extension Request form available on MyUni that must be signed off by both student and tutor. Extensions will be granted on the grounds of hardship or illness, but you must submit a request for an extension to your tutor in writing via email (with supporting medical or other evidence to be provided) before the due date.

    Students wishing to apply for an extension need to submit the relevant form available at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/mod_arrange.html to the school office at least 5 days prior to the due date for the assignment.

    Exceptions to the Policy
    If one of the following criteria is met, an informal extension can be organised with the course coordinator or tutor:
    · small extension – 2 days or less;
    · assessment item is worth 20% or less;
    · student is registered with the Disability Office (need to attach a Disability Access Plan – DAP).
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

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