INTBUS 7015 - Cross-Cultural Management and Negotiation (M)

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

This course explores the effect of cultural differences on organisational behaviour and negotiation in the global context. It exposes students to issues and problems that inevitably arise in international business when managers have to deal with culturally determined differences in values, attitudes and behaviours. The course assists students in developing cross-cultural communication competence and management and negotiation skills to successfully solve problems and capitalise on opportunities in a multicultural environment. Specific topics include understanding the foundations of culture and cultural frameworks; cross-cultural verbal and non-verbal communication and communication styles; motivation, leadership and decision making across cultures; negotiation and conflict resolution in global business settings; understanding organisational culture; managing multicultural teams and culturally diverse organisations. Students will have an opportunity to study concepts and theories from cross-cultural psychology and management and apply the acquired knowledge in hands-on activities such as scenario-based discussions, case studies and simulations in order to gain relevant skills.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code INTBUS 7015
    Course Cross-Cultural Management and Negotiation (M)
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Incompatible COMMGMT 7015
    Course Description This course explores the effect of cultural differences on organisational behaviour and negotiation in the global context. It exposes students to issues and problems that inevitably arise in international business when managers have to deal with culturally determined differences in values, attitudes and behaviours. The course assists students in developing cross-cultural communication competence and management and negotiation skills to successfully solve problems and capitalise on opportunities in a multicultural environment. Specific topics include understanding the foundations of culture and cultural frameworks; cross-cultural verbal and non-verbal communication and communication styles; motivation, leadership and decision making across cultures; negotiation and conflict resolution in global business settings; understanding organisational culture; managing multicultural teams and culturally diverse organisations. Students will have an opportunity to study concepts and theories from cross-cultural psychology and management and apply the acquired knowledge in hands-on activities such as scenario-based discussions, case studies and simulations in order to gain relevant skills.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Olga Muzychenko

    Dr. Olga Muzychenko is a lecturer at the University of Adelaide Business School. Prior to joining the Business School Olga worked for other Australian and French universities. Olga’s expertise in the field of Cross-cultural Management is based on her research and experience of working and living in different countries. Olga’s research interests include management of cultural diversity in Australia and cross-cultural competence in different professional fields. She authored and co-authored a number of refereed publications in international academic journals. Her expertise in the subject area is complemented by experience of working and living in different countries such as United Kingdom, Australia, France, China, Singapore, Hong-Kong, Italy, Russia, and Armenia.

    Olga is also a consultant for the International Labor Organisation. In this capacity her assignments included training government officials and professionals from many countries at the International Training Centre of International Labor Organisation in Turin, Italy.

    Olga holds a PhD from the University of Adelaide (Australia), M. Sc. from the University of Stirling (UK) and BA (Hons) from Moscow State University (Russia). Her PhD research explored the influence of cultural differences on the process of international entrepreneurship and studied the notion of cross-cultural competence among Australian entrepreneurs.

    Dr. Muzychenko is available for consultation after each class and by appointment at any other time. The best way to reach the lecturer is via e-mail.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Date/time Topic Assignment due date
    Part 1: Understanding cultural differences and developing self-awareness
    Session 1
    10 am – 5 pm
    Venue: 10 Pulteney Street,    Level 13 Seminar room 01
    Topic 1: Understanding culture: Values, world views and socio-cultural systems.
    Topic 2: Cultural dimensions theories: The practical applicability and limitations.
    Session 2
    10 am – 5 pm
    Venue: as above
    Topic 3: The impact of cultural differences on individuals. Verbal and non-verbal communication across cultures.
    Part 2: Cultural differences in various organisational contexts and developing interpersonal managerial responses and strategies
    Session 2 continued
    10 am – 5 pm
    Venue: as above
    Topic 4: Conflict and ethics across cultures.
    Session 3
    10 am – 5 pm
    Venue: as above


    Topic 5: Cross-cultural negotiation: The process and strategies

    Topic 6: Cultural aspects of international business negotiations.
    Individual assignment due
    Session 4
    10 am – 5 pm
    Venue: as above
    Topic 7: Decision making and leadership across cultures.
    Topic 8: Motivating across cultures.
    Part 3: Cultural differences at the organisational level
    Session 5
    10 am – 5 pm
    Venue: as above
    Topic 9: Organisational culture and national culture. Cultural aspects of mergers and acquisitions.
    Topic 10: Management of Cultural Diversity. Managing multicultural teams.
    Part 4: Integrating what you learned in this course
    Session 6
    10 am – 5 pm
    Venue: as above 
    Topic 11: Cross-cultural intelligence and managerial competence.
    Group presentations Power point slides for presentations must be submitted via e-mail to the lecturer by 9 am on Wednesday 6 May.
    7 May: Presentations
    Wednesday 14 May: Group assignment (report) due.
    Date to be confirmed Final exam

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from the Course Planner at
    https://access.adelaide.edu.au/courses/details.asp?year=2014&course=106358+1+3410+1
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    This course has the following objectives:
    1. to provide you with a sufficient knowledge and understanding of the socio-cultural dimensions and its implications for communication and management differences across cultures;
    2. to enable you to understand differing approaches to management issues that exist around the world;
    3. to enable you to gain sound perspectives on competent practice in communicating and managing within a culturally diverse context;
    4. to help you develop cultural sensitivity needed to succeed in any kind of cross-cultural interactions;
    5. to assist you with developing capability to competently apply course concepts in cross- cultural situations that require responses at the individual, managerial and organisational levels.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1,5
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 3,5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 2,3,4
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1,2
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Text book: Saee, J. 2007. Managing organisations in a global economy: An intercultural perspective. 2nd edition. Cengage Learning, United States.
    Course materials posted on MyUni: Case studies, exercises, and library links to readings.
    Recommended Resources
    Adler, N. (2003). International Dimensions of organisational behavior (3rd Edition) South-Western College Publishing, Ohio, USA

    Axtel, (1998). Gestures: the dos and taboos of body language around the world.

    Bartlett, C.A. & Ghoshal, S. (1989). Managing Across Borders. Harvard Business School Press.

    Brislin, R. (1993). Understanding culture’s influence on behavior. Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace.

    Cope, B. & Kalantzis, (1997). Productive diversity: A new Australian model for work and management. Sydney: Pluto Press.

    Furnham, A. & Bochner, S. (1989). Culture shock: Psychological reactions to unfamiliar environments. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

    Gudykunst, W. & Ting-Toomey, S. (1988). Culture and interpersonal communication. NewburyPark: Sage.

    Hall, E. (1977) The silent language. NY: Fawsett.

    Hall, E. T. (1976). Beyond culture. New York: Anchor Press.

    Hofstede, G., Hofstede, G.I., and Minkov, M. (2010). Cultures and organisations: Software of the mind. London: McGraw Hill.

    Irwin, H. (1996). Communicating with Asia. Understanding people and customs. Australia: Allen & Unwin.

    Kluckhohn, F. & Strodtbeck, F. (1961). Variations in value orientation. New York: Harper & Row.

    Lewis, R. (1999). When cultures collide: Managing successfully across cultures. Nicolas Brealey Publishing, London

    Littlejohn, S. (1996). Theories of Human Communication. Wadsworth Publishing Company, California, USA

    Lustig, M. & Koester, I. (1993). Intercultural competence: Interpersonal communication across cultures. New York: Harper Collins.

    Martin, J.N. & Nakayama, T.K. (1997). Intercultural communication in context. USA: Mayfield Publication Company.

    Morris, D. (1994). The human animal. London, BBC books.

    Trompenaars, F., and Hampden-Turner, C. (1997). Riding the Waves of Culture, Nicholas Brealey, London.

    Trompenaars, F., and Hampden-Turner, C. (2001). Building Cross-cultural competence: How to create wealth from conflicting values . New York: John Wiley and Sons.

    Trompenaars, F., and Hampden-Turner, C. (2004). Managing people across cultures. Chichester: Capstone.

    Wiseman, R. & Koester, I. (1993). Intercultural communication competence. Newbury Park: Sage.

    Journals
    International Journal of Intercultural Relations
    Journal of International Business Studies
    Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
    International Sociological Journal
    Harvard Business Review
    International Journal of Cross-cultural Management
    Online Learning
    In preparation for each lecture please visit MyUni course site www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au to access course materials. The lecturer’s PowerPoint files, case studies and exercises for each session will be posted on MyUni weekly. Power point lecture notes offer both a summary of important material and some supplementary information. My Uni will also be used be the lecturer to post important messages.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course uses a mixture of readings, experiential exercises, cases and guest speakers (to be confirmed).
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The University expects full-time students (i.e. those taking 12 units per semester) to devote a total of 48 hours per week to their studies. This means that you are expected to commit approximately 9 hours per week of private study outside of your regular classes. This includes preparation for classes and working on assignments.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Topic 1: Understanding culture: Values, world views and socio-cultural systems.
    Reference material: Saee, Chapter 3; Course Materials folder on MyUni Activities: Self-awareness exercise
     Session 1
    Topic 2: Cultural dimensions theories: The practical applicability and limitations. Reference material: Saee, Chapter 2; Course Materials folder on MyUni
    Topic 3: The impact of cultural differences on individuals. Verbal and non-verbal communication across cultures.
    Reference material: Saee, Chapters 4 - 6; Course Materials folder on MyUni Activities: Case study, self-awareness exercises
     Session 2
    Topic 4: Conflict and ethics across cultures.
    Reference material: Saee, Chapters 11 and 12; Course Materials folder on MyUni Activities: Case studies and mini scenarios
    Topic 5: Cross-cultural negotiation: The process and strategies
    Reference material: Saee, Chapter 10 ; Course Materials folder on MyUni Activities: Case study, role play
    Session 3
    Topic 6: Cultural aspects of international business negotiations.
    Reference material: Course Materials folder on MyUni.
    Activities: role play
    Topic 7: Decision making and leadership across cultures.
    Reference material: Saee, Chapter 8; Course Materials folder on MyUni Activities: Case study
    Session 4
    Topic 8: Motivating across cultures.
    Reference material: Saee, Chapter 9; Course Materials folder on MyUni Activities: Role play
    Topic 9: Organisational culture and national culture. Cultural aspects of mergers and acquisitions.
    Reference material: Saee, Chapter 7, pp. 139-151; Course Materials folder on MyUni Activities: Case study
    Session 5
    Topic 10: Management of Cultural Diversity. Managing multicultural teams.
    Reference material: Saee, Chapter 7, pp. 151-153; Course Materials folder on MyUni Activities: Case study
    Topic 11 (Integrative): Cross-cultural intelligence and managerial competence. Reference material: Saee, Chapter 15; Course Materials folder on MyUni Session 6
    Group presentations
    Final exam TBA
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    Assessment item Percentage of total mark Relevant learning objective(s) Due or scheduled date
    Individual assignment (Reflective report: Culture visit or Critical incident) 20% Learning objectives 1, 3-5 2 April 2014
    Group assignment (presentation) 10% Learning objectives 1-3 7 May 2014
    Group assignment (report) 15 % Learning objectives 1-3 14 May 2014
    Class participation 10% Learning objectives 1-5 Ongoing
    Final examination 45% Learning objectives 1-5 Date to be confirmed
    Group assessment tasks have a maximum 30% weighting. A minimum of seventy percent (70%) of the total value of a course’s assessment will be devoted to individually submitted work, which may be in the form of assignments, examinations or presentations.

    To gain a pass for this course, a mark of at least 45% must be obtained on the examination as well as a total of at least 50% for individual work and a mark of 50% overall. Students not achieving this requirement will receive an F grade as their final grade.
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students in this course are expected to attend all seminars throughout the semester.
    Assessment Detail
    Individual Assignment: 20%

    Option 1: Culture visit and reflective report

    You are asked to visit a national culture that is unfamiliar to you, interact with members of that culture and write a report about your experiences. The objective is to simulate, as closely as possible, what it would be like for you to go and work in a culture new to you.

    The emphasis of this fieldwork assignment is on experiential learning. The task is to experience entry into and dealing with another culture directly (as opposed to studying or speculating about it). When choosing a culture, keep in mind that culture is a group phenomenon. Therefore, spending some time with just one member of the culture may not enable you to see any more than one person’s views.

    The specific national culture you visit is completely up to you and is only limited by the number of cultures present in Adelaide. The way you find and contact your culture of choice is also up to you. However, below are contact details of some multicultural groups in Adelaide. You could ask to be allowed entrance to one of their social evenings, go to their social clubs or restaurants, spend an evening with a family or talk to individual members of a culture. Use your creativity!

    The report on your fieldwork experiences should include the following items:
    • Description of the national culture you chose and why you chose it.
    • Preparation for entering the culture – reading, thinking about it, contacting people, collecting information, etc. This should include your expectations about the culture based on your preparation.
    • Gaining entry – how you did it. Contact person, how contacted, permission, etc.
    • Description of the experience and the main cultural differences you experienced.
    • Description of what “culture shock” if any, you experienced, your reactions to it, and how you adapted.
    • Reflection – what you learned from the experience (including what you learned about yourself, if appropriate): feelings, insights; links with international business, the course material and other readings and/or experiences; expectations confirmed, disconfirmed; surprises – both positive and negative. Try to draw generalizations from the visit experience, your previous experiences and the course. Try to integrate your learning from these different sources.
    • Recommendations – how would you enhance your cross-cultural entry next time?

    The last two items (reflection and recommendations) are the most important parts of the report. Please give them due attention. In the report, try to relate your experience as much as possible to the theories and models discussed in the first three topics

    Multicultural groups in Adelaide
    Organisations Telephone number
    Adelaide Lithuanian Society Inc 8362 4931
    Australia-Brunei Darussalam Business Council 8221 5722
    Australia-China Friendship Society 8272 9763
    Bulgarian Educational & Friendly Soc. Inc. 8356 3254
    Cambodian Australian Association Inc. 8281 9811
    Chinese Association of SA 8297 0098
    Chinese Language & Cultural Advice 8352 6128
    Chinese Welfare Services of SA 8212 2988
    Croatian Community Council SA 8346 4099, 8235 0511
    Dom Polski (Polish) Centre 8223 3884
    Dutch Community (Dutch Social & Welfare Club) Inc. 8281 1441
    Ethnic Schools Assoc. of SA Inc. 8301 4814
    German Association Inc. 8232 2082
    German Language School 0412 233 041
    Greek Orthodox Community of SA Inc. 8231 4307
    Indian Australian Association of SA Inc 8364 1414
    Irish Australian Association Inc. 8212 3767
    Italian Centre 8223 2417
    Jewish Community Services Inc. 8212 0077
    Laos Association of SA Inc 8283 0378
    Macedonian Community - Cultural Centre 8347 1401
    Overseas Chinese Association 8445 7355
    Spanish Latino Americana Association 8250 7755
    Royal Caledonian Society of SA Inc 8379 2515
    Ukrainian Community 0417 889 274
    Vietnamese Community in SA 8447 8821
    United Vietnamese Buddhist Congregation of SA 8447 8477
    Additional information about multicultural groups in Adelaide is available on http://www.bcl.com.au/adelaide/intgroup/multicultural.htm

    Option 2: Critical incident report

    If you are unable to conduct a culture visit, you are allowed to write a critical incident as an alternative assignment. However, please do not choose this alternative lightly. You will learn much more from conducting the culture visit.

    Critical incidents are brief descriptions in which there is a misunderstanding, problem or conflict arising from cultural differences between interacting parties or where there is a problem of cross-cultural adaptation. Your critical incident should be based on personal experience. It can deal with any subject as long as it discusses a situation in which you interacted with members of another culture and in which misunderstandings were caused by cultural differences or you had to use your cross-cultural skills to prevent misunderstandings from arising. To write this critical incident you should follow the following five steps (based on Fowler & Mumford, 1995):
    1. Identify the event or situation as clearly as possible, the problem to be solved, the issue involved, etc.
    2. Describe the relevant details and circumstances surrounding the event, so that the readers will understand what happened. (What? When? How? Why? Where?)
    3. List the people involved: describe them and their relationships to you and to one another (Who?)
    4. Describe your own role in the situation (that is, what you did and how you acted) and identify the particular cultural differences and/or cross-cultural skill or skills involved. How well or badly did you understand the situation? How well or badly did you use the skill involved? What would you do differently next time? Describe your interpretation of the events.
    5. Write an analysis of the incident, telling what you learned from the experience.
    In writing the critical incident report, try to relate your experience as much as possible to the theories and models discussed in the first three topics.

    Word limit: 2000 words.
    Exceeding a word limit will attract a 5% reduction in your mark. The word count excludes the executive summary, and appendixes.

    Due date: 2 April 2014


    Assessment criteria:
    • Logic and flow of argument;
    • Ability to present your findings clearly and succinctly;
    • Application of key relevant theories and concepts;
    • Research skills and use of data to support the analysis;
    • Recommendations and tradeoffs identified in analysis;
    • Relevance to the topic;
    • Effective overall strategy, adequate introduction, body, and conclusion;
    • Presentation: word limit; layout; referencing and bibliography.
    Group assignment : 25 % (report 15 %, presentation 10%)

    In a group of 3-4 students analyse (a) socio-cultural system and its impacts on management and business practices in a country of your choice and (b) research and describe cultural aspects of the negotiating style in that country.

    Your report must include a brief analysis that compares/contrasts cultural values, management practices and negotiating style n the country selected for the report and in the home country(ies) of group members.

    You are invited to selects a country from the following list: China, Malaysia, India, Indonesia, South Korea, Japan, Brazil, Thailand, Columbia, Mexico, Vietnam, Turkey, Russia, France, and Germany. Your choice of a country must be approved by the by the lecturer.

    You are encouraged to use creative approach to the presentation. Please highlight those elements of your project that you found to be particularly interesting or contentious and enable the class to learn from your research. You are expected to use scholarly journal articles and books as a source of reference.

    Word limit (report): 3000 words
    . Exceeding a word limit will attract a 5% reduction in your mark. The word count excludes the executive summary, and appendixes.

    Due date: 14 May 2014


    Assessment criteria (report):
    • Logic and flow of argument;
    • Ability to present your findings clearly and succinctly;
    • Application of key relevant theories and concepts;
    • Research skills and use of data to support the analysis;
    • Recommendations and tradeoffs identified in analysis;
    • Relevance to the topic;
    • Effective overall strategy, adequate introduction, body, and conclusion;
    • Presentation: word limit; layout; referencing and bibliography.
    Presentation length: 15-20 minutes plus questions and answers time.

    Due date: 7 May 2014. Power point slides must be submitted to the lecturer by 9 am on 6 May 2014.

    Assessment criteria (presentation):
    • Research quality;
    • Application of CCM concepts in analysing research;
    • Creativity in presentation style;
    • Stimulating interest for the audience;
    • Highlighting key points;
    • Handling questions.
    Class Participation 10 %

    Assessment criteria:
    • Participation in class discussions such as for example putting forward one’s point of view with a brief supporting argument; summarising and evaluating ideas/issues that arise from course readings; asking questions directly related to issues/problems discussed in class;
    • Participation in in-class group activities.

    Final Exam: 45%
    There will be a 3 hour exam. It is likely to include essay type questions and a case study.
    Submission
    You are required to submit a soft copy of your assignments as Word.doc(x) file directly to the lecturer at olga.muzychenko@adelaide.edu.au . PDF files and assignments not complying with formatting requirements will not be accepted
    A hard copy with a signed assignment cover sheet must be submitted to the lecturer in class unless an alternative arrangement was made.

    Presentation of Assignments
    • Please must retain a copy of all assignments submitted.
    • Please attach an ‘Assignment Cover Sheet’, which is signed and dated by you before submission.
    • All group assignments must be attached to a ‘Group Assignment Cover Sheet’, which must be signed and dated by all group members before submission. All team members are expected to contribute approximately equally to a group assignment.
    • Your assignment must include a title page that indicates your name, student number, email address, course name, course coordinator, assignment topic and word count (excluding executive summary, attachments and appendices). Please note that word limits will be strictly enforced. The word count excludes the executive summary, and appendixes.
    Formatting requirements:
    • Double spacing with 2.5 cm margins
    • Page numbers on each page
    • Tables and figures correctly labelled and include titles (note difference between tables and figures!)
    • Relevant diagrams should be in the main body of the report only supplementary material in the appendix
    • Appendixes (for additional information) attached and labelled.
    Lecturers can refuse to accept assignments, which do not have a signed acknowledgement of the University’s policy on plagiarism.

    Assignment Guidelines including Referencing Details
    A copy of the Postgraduate Programs: Communication Skills Guide will have been given to you at the beginning of your program. This guide will assist you structure your assignments. A copy of the guide can also be downloaded from
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/professions/hub/downloads/MBA-Communication-Skills-Guide.pdf

    This publication also provides guidelines on a range of other important communication skills including writing essays and management reports, making oral presentations etc.
    In preparing any written piece of assessment for your postgraduate studies it is important to draw on the relevant ‘literature’ to support critical analysis. Also essential is to reference the literature used. Correct referencing is important because it identifies the source of the ideas and arguments that you present, and sometimes the source of the actual words you use, and helps to avoid the problem of plagiarism. (Further information on plagiarism is provided later in this course outline.)
    The Harvard system is widely used in the Business School. Guidelines for the use of this style of referencing can be found in the Communication Skills Guide.

    Further assistance with referencing is available from the Faculty’s Learning Support Advisors. The contact details are provided on page 6 of the Communication Skills Guide.

    Late Assignment Submission and Extensions to Due Dates
    Students are expected to submit their work by the due date to maintain a fair and equitable system. Extensions will generally only be given for medical or other serious reasons. All requests for extensions must be emailed to the lecturer in charge of the course before the due date. Each request will be assessed on its merits. A late assignment (without prior arrangement) will be penalised by a 5% mark reduction for each day that it is late.

    Return of Assignments
    Lecturer’s aim to mark and return assignments to students within two (2) weeks of the due date with written feedback. Students are responsible for collecting their marked assignments from either their tutorials or lectures. If assignments aren’t collected after two (2) weeks, the assignments will be available at the Student Hub for two (2) weeks. The remaining assignments will only be posted out to the students, if the correct mailing addresses are on the assignments.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.