GEOG 2154 - Applied Population Analysis

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

This course explores the way in which the detailed analysis of population data in the context of demographic theory and methods, can contribute to decision making in government and the private sector. Lectures and guided readings will be interspersed with workshops focussed on problems such as ageing of the population, changing household and family structures, population size and the environment, the planning of health, welfare and education services, and identifying changing consumer demand for products and services. Students will prepare a set of population projections in the workshops, undertaking an analysis of fertility, mortality and migration (the components of population growth), to establish the likely growth of future regional and local populations. Selected applications will be examined in relation to current and future population trends and how demography and its social applications can contribute to solving a problem, assembling the requisite data, arguments and insights in the form of a report.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOG 2154
    Course Applied Population Analysis
    Coordinating Unit Geography, Environment and Population
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of undergraduate study
    Course Description This course explores the way in which the detailed analysis of population data in the context of demographic theory and methods, can contribute to decision making in government and the private sector. Lectures and guided readings will be interspersed with workshops focussed on problems such as ageing of the population, changing household and family structures, population size and the environment, the planning of health, welfare and education services, and identifying changing consumer demand for products and services. Students will prepare a set of population projections in the workshops, undertaking an analysis of fertility, mortality and migration (the components of population growth), to establish the likely growth of future regional and local populations. Selected applications will be examined in relation to current and future population trends and how demography and its social applications can contribute to solving a problem, assembling the requisite data, arguments and insights in the form of a report.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Dianne Rudd

    Dr Dianne Rudd (course coordinator)
    Ground Level Napier Building, Room G34, Phone 831 34109
    Email: dianne.rudd@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. An understanding of demographic methods and concepts
    2. An ability to analyse and interpret population data and have a working knowledge of appropriate population data sources and contemporary technologies for analysis and presentation
    3. An understanding of changing consumer demands and the service needs of Australia’s ageing population
    4. An understanding of the role of population projections and knowledge of how they are made and used.
    5. An understanding of how mortality, fertility and migration analysis is vital in the production of assumptions for population projections and to forecast age structure change
    6. To assess population policy at national, state and local levels which can impinge upon the population–environment relationship and the need for achieving sustainable populations and communities.
    7. An ability to present population analysis with high quality written and verbal skills
    8. To interpret demographic trends for future planning–solving skills
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1-5
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 6,7,8
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 6,7
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 8
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1-5
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 7,8
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1-7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Although there is no prescribed text for this course as there is no one book that deals with the methods taught which has tended to be a relatively neglected area of research. Methods, Data sources and literature have been compiled and are available on MyUni for easy student access. The Australian Bureau of Statistics provides important census data on Australia’s population and it distribution in the form of publications and online material.
    http://www.abs.gov.au/
     
    Recommended Resources
    Lecture and readings –integrated with specific workshop modules, access to data sources and computers
    Online Learning
    MYUNI will be used for course –related announcements, emails to all students etc. information about weekly workshop assignments and readings –pdfs on Myuni also research topics, data and readings
    The posting of Lecture material for all lectures in the course and recordings
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course lectures provide basic factual information and information on data and techniques of population analysis, measurement, sources of data, presentation and interpretation. The workshops are linked to the lectures and together with readings each week follow a sequence of modules. The first based on census data examines population and socio-economic trends using EXCEL to show social indicators, tables and graphs. The second is based on of fertliity, mortality and migration trends. The third focuses upon providing an overall research report and its presentation. Finally, the exam will assess the extent to which students have developed an understanding of key demographic and social data and techniques of analysis, presentation and interpretation. The course is very much skills based with the workshop modules and the final exam designed to evaluate the competence of students in the design and appropriate analysis of demographic data. The following workshops are linked to the lectures.

    WORKSHOP I
    Analysis of population data -census

    WORKSHOP 2
    Analysis of population change

    WORKSHOP 3
    Analysis of population ageing

    WORKSHOP 4
    Population models - best practice

     WORKSHOP 5
    Analysis birth and death data

    WORKSHOP 6
    Migration profiles

    WORKSHOP 7
    International migration flows

    Workshop 8
    Analysis for project reports

    WORKSHOP 9
    Presentation of research reports

    Workshop 10
    Presentation of research reports 
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    · Structured learning (1 lecture and 1 (2hour)workshop ) 3 hours per week
    · Background reading to workshop exercises: 4 hours per week
    · Research report – team work on topic -research and preparation :3 hours per week (average)
    · Exam revision: 2 hours per week averaged over course topics.
    Learning Activities Summary

    Lecture & Topic outline

    Introduction to population analysis &data
     
    Demographic concepts and Measures 
     
    Population composition measures and concepts

    Population projections- how they are made

    Practicalities of preparing projections for government and planning

    Analysis of Mortality

    Analyis of Fertility

    Analysis of Migration-internal

    Analysis of Migration -international

     Population Analysis for Government and business/changing consumer demand

    Analysis of Families and households

    Exam summary and revision
     
    Specific Course Requirements
    Compulsory attendance at workshops and sit the exam
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Workshop Participation (10 per cent) satisfactory completion of 2 workshop modules (30 per cent).
    Research report and presentation - 2000 words (20 per cent) Due November 3
    Exam-40 per cent (2 hours)

    It is a requirement of the course that students attend and submit workshop assignments which are an essential basis for the research report.
    Assessment Related Requirements
    It is important that students attend the lecture and the two hour workshop each week. It will be difficult to pick up the work readily after missing lectures or workshops.
    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission
    All assignments in this course must be submitted online via the relevant MyUni course site.
    NOTE: Assignment files must be converted to PDF before being submitted to MyUni - for assistance in converting your assignment file to PDF please see http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/tutorials/content/ICC_Printed_Assignment_PDF_creation.html
    For instructions on submitting your PDF assignment file to MyUni for marking please see http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/tutorials/content/Assignment-submit_an_Assignment__as_a_student_.html
    For more assistance on submitting your PDF assignment file to MyUni please telephone the Service Desk on 831 33000, 8 am – 6 pm, Monday to Friday or email servicedesk@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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