GEOG 2155 - Social Change and Environmental Challenges

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

The social and environmental challenges of the 21st Century require innovative ways of thinking about and intervening in the world. The work of Michel Foucault opens a new way of understanding social change and, consequently, new ways to address social and environmental challenges. This course provides an accessible introduction to Foucault's work and explores its uses in the social sciences - especially in geography and environmental studies. In particular, we discuss the application of Foucault's ideas through case studies of built environment processes, mobility, globalisation, environmental programs and policies (and others by negotiation with students). These case studies also introduce students to key scholars who have interpreted and elaborated on Foucault's work including Peter Miller, Nicholas Rose, Mitchell Dean, Carol Bacchi, John Law, Annemarie Mol, Susan Hekman and Judith Butler.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOG 2155
    Course Social Change and Environmental Challenges
    Coordinating Unit Geography, Environment and Population
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of undergraduate study
    Course Description The social and environmental challenges of the 21st Century require innovative ways of thinking about and intervening in the world. The work of Michel Foucault opens a new way of understanding social change and, consequently, new ways to address social and environmental challenges. This course provides an accessible introduction to Foucault's work and explores its uses in the social sciences - especially in geography and environmental studies. In particular, we discuss the application of Foucault's ideas through case studies of built environment processes, mobility, globalisation, environmental programs and policies (and others by negotiation with students). These case studies also introduce students to key scholars who have interpreted and elaborated on Foucault's work including Peter Miller, Nicholas Rose, Mitchell Dean, Carol Bacchi, John Law, Annemarie Mol, Susan Hekman and Judith Butler.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Bonham

    Consultation Times: Open door - Tuesday 1pm-3pm
    All other times by appointment only (make appointments via email)

    Contact
    Email: jennifer.bonham@adelaide.edu.au
    Phone: 8313 4655
    Office: Napier G24
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Week 1: Lecture and tutorial topics
    Introduction: The work of Michel Foucault: context and central problematics 

    Weeks 2 - 6 Archaeology, Genealogy, Governmentality, Ethics, 
    Foucault - early applications, scholars and critics

    Weeks 7 - 12 Foucault Scholars.
    Elaborating Foucault to address contemporary social and environmental issues
     

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes



    1. Knowledge and understanding of the work of Michel Foucault and key criticisms of his work.

    2. Knowledge and understanding of the applications and implications of Foucault’s work in the socio-spatial and environmental disciplines.

    3. Knowledge of how key scholars have elaborated Foucault’s ideas and methods in socio-spatial and environmental disciplines.

    4. Ability to apply the concepts and methods developed in Foucauldian scholarship.

    5. High level written and verbal communication skills.

    6. High level analytical skills.

    7. Ability to locate, synthesise and critically engage with social theory literature.

    8. Ability to construct and communicate logical and appropriately supported arguments.

    9. Skills in reflexivity.

    10. Ability to work in a team

     

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2, 3
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 6, 7
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 4
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 5, 8, 9, 10
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 9
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 9, 10
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 4, 5, 6, 9, 10
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    All required reading will be made available via MyUni.
    Recommended Resources

    Students will be directed to relevant excerpts from the books, articles, and collected works listed below.

    Introductions to Foucault's work
     
    Dreyfus H and Rabinow P (1982) Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics.
                 
    Brighton, UK: Harvester Wheatsheaf.
    Eribon D (1993) Michel Foucault. London, UK: Faber & Faber.
    Gutting G (2005) Foucault: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    McHoul A and Grace W (1993) Foucault primer: Discourse, power and the subject. Carlton, Australia:
                 Melbourne University Press. 
    Smart B (1985) Michel Foucault. London, UK: Routledge.
    Taylor D (2011) Michel Foucault: Key Concepts.  Durham, UK: Acumen.

    Journals 
    Economy & Society http://www.tandfonline.com.proxy.library.adelaide.edu.au/loi/reso20
    Foucault Studies http://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/foucault-studies/index

    Key Texts by Foucault
    Books
    Foucault M (1972) The Archaeology of Knowledge London, UK: Tavistock Publications Ltd: . (OR 2002 
                             Routledge edition).
                     (1977) Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison : London, UK: Penguin.
                     (1978) The History of Sexuality Vol. 1  London, UK: Penguin.
                     
    Articles, book chapters and collections of writings, interviews and lectures will be used throughout the
    course and will be made available to students via MyUni.


    Key texts by Foucault Scholars

    Articles by scholars such as  John Law, Annemarie Mol, Judith Butler, Paul Rabinow, Susan Hekman, Carol Bacchi, Colin Koopman, Cressida Heyes, Peter Miller, Nicholas Rose, Bruno Latour, Mitchell Dean and Barry Hindess will be made available via MyUni in the relevant teaching weeks.

    Online Learning
    See course website: https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/ for all course material, announcements and additional resources.
    Students will use MyUni - Discussion Board and Quiz - for some assessment pieces.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    This course is taught mainly in face-to-face mode through interactive-lectures and tutorials but will also include on-line forums and resources.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.


    This information is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements. Course activities (lectures, tutorials, reading, assignments and on-line tasks) have been created in line with the University of Adelaide policy that students enrolled in 3 Unit courses will spend an average of 12 hours/week or 144 hours per semester engaged in learning related to that course.

    Face-to-face contact (lectures and tutorials) - 3 hours per week
    Tutorial preparation (reading, reflection) - 3 hours per week
    Assignment preparation - average 6 hours per week
    Learning Activities Summary

    Week 1: Michel Foucault, Context and central problematics.
    Weeks 2 - 6: Archaeology, Geneaology, Governmentality, Ethics. Application of Foucault's work in the
                       Social Sciences.
    Weeks 7-12: Elaborating Foucault - new developments and applications.
    Specific Course Requirements
    Nil
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    This course engages students with the different world views that inform social research.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assignment 2. Will be open to negotiation with students.
    Assignment 3. Students can choose whether to do an Essay or Exam
    All Due Dates are provisional
    Assignment No./Task Word Count/
    Equivalent
    Assessment
    Type
    Learning
    Objectives
    Due Dates Value %
    Assignment 1. Book Review 1000 Summative 1, 2, 3, 5 22 August 20%
    Assignment 2. Participation and Tutorial Exercises
    i. Tutorial engagement (20%)
    ii.Glossary contribution (10%)
    iii.Quiz and in-class quiz review (10%)
    2500 (sum of
    components)
    Summative



    i. 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10
    ii. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    iii. 1, 2, 3, 10



    i. Weekly
    ii.Student nominated
    iii.10 Oct
    40%
    Assignment 3. Essay OR Exam 2500 Summative 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 14 Nov 40%
    Assessment Detail
    Assignment 1: Book Review
    Students should select, read and write a critical review of one of the books listed in the course guide. Examples of book reviews will be provided to students on MyUni and in class.

    Marking Criteria (a comprehensive rubric will be posted on MyUni prior to the start of semester)
    1. Concise and accurate summary
    2. Identification and well supported discussion of positive and negative aspects of the book
    3. Consideration of target audience
    4. Structure, style, grammar and presentation

    NB. These contributions are to be posted on MyUni so they can be available to all class members.


    Assignment 2: Tutorial participation and exercises (Total 40%)

    i. Engagement – 20%
    Aims: To deepen students knowledge and develop their ability to apply concepts.
              To foster student's ability to work in a team.
    The task for each tutorial will be to determine the key concepts Foucault has developed and how other researchers have applied these concepts to social and environmental issues. Students will then collaborate to produce a brief overview of how they would apply these concepts to a social or environmental ‘problem’ of their choosing. Overviews will be uploaded to the Tutorial discussion board each week.

    Engagement Criteria
    · attendance at tutorials 
    · demonstrated completion of, and engagement with reading
    · demonstrated active listening
    · relevant contribution to discussion of concepts, formulation of ‘problem’, and development of overview
    · upload of overview to Tutorial discussion board
     

    ii. Glossary contribution
    Aim:To develop student knowledge and ability to apply concepts.
    Each student will nominate a week to make a contribution to the on-line Course Glossary. The Glossary will be developed in the Discussion Board on MyUni. Contributions must be uploaded by 9am Monday of the nominated week. Contributors must explain a concept related to the material to be covered in the lectures/tutorial for that week. Contributors should also include an example of how this concept can be applied to a social or environmental question. 

    An example will be provided on MyUni prior to the start of the semester. 


    iii. Quiz – 10% 
    Aim: Test students’ knowledge of key concepts learned throughout the course.
    The on-line quiz will be available between 9am - 11.59pm on Friday 17 October. Answers will be discussed during the Week 11 tutorials.  



    Assignment 3: Essay or Exam 
    Students can choose to do either an essay or an exam. For administrative purposes, students must nominate by the end of Week 6 whether they will sit the exam or write an essay. Both the exam and essay will be scheduled for completion on the same day.
    Word Length: 2500 words

    Essay Questions will be posted on MyUni by Week 6/Semester 2. 

    Marking Criteria (A comprehensive essay rubric will be posted on MyUni prior to the start of semester)
    1. Argument and evidence
    2. Literature and critical engagement
    3. Structure
    4. Presentation
    Submission
    Submission formats as follows:

    Book Review and Essay must be submitted on-line via MyUni. Students must sbumit assignments first to Turnitin and then to the ICC printed assignment.

    Quiz - on-line via MyUni
    Glossary contribution - on-line MyUni Discussion Board
    Tutorial Overview - on-line Tutorial Discussion Board


    Extensions
    Extensions may be granted on genuine medical or compassionate grounds (supported by appropriate documentation). Students must apply to the course coordinator for an extension in writing (e.g. via email) before the due date. Students will be notified via email as to whether they have been granted an extension.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    Content
    This course is for students who want to engage with new ways of thinking which lead to new ways of generating positive change. Student feedback has been overwhelmingly positive with comments such:
    'I have never learnt so much in one course that actually excited me. It expanded how I think and analyse things.'

    'Challenges thinking methods in a positive and constructive way.'

    'Content was mind blowing and life chaning. It has engaged me in such a critical way that I can improve applications and performance in other discipines.'

    Workload
    The workload has remained the same given positive feedback on this aspect of the course.
    Student comments: 'The workload is really balanced. I liked the tutorials so, so much.'
                                  'Workload was good.'

    Changes
    Some changes have been made based on student comments.

    Discussion board will be available for students who want to engage in course content beyond that requried in assigments
    Student comment: I wanted a discussion Board open (other than the glossary) to talk about things in society.

    Tutorials
    Although students enjoyed tutorials these will be more focused on applying Foucault scholarship to social and environmental issues of current concern to students. In view of the more structured approach in tutorials the weighting for tutorial enagement has been increased from 10% to 20% and the second quiz has been dropped.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.