SPAN 3103 - Spanish Literature and Society

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

This course builds on the knowledge and skills students have acquired in SPAN 2112 Introduction to the Culture of Spain. The main emphasis of this course will be on the reading and analysis of representative works of literature produced in Spain from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Some of the authors to be included for study and analysis are Miguel de Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos, Federico Garcia Lorca, and Miguel Delibes. Reading literary material and reporting back to the class in oral form will be the key activity for students in this course. Students will also be introduced in full to the specific and most effective ways of conducting research on Hispanic literatures. Lectures and seminars will be conducted in Spanish and students will be expected to actively contribute to discussions in the Spanish language.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code SPAN 3103
    Course Spanish Literature and Society
    Coordinating Unit Spanish Studies
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Prerequisites SPAN 2102
    Assumed Knowledge Basic fluency in the Spanish language
    Course Description This course builds on the knowledge and skills students have acquired in SPAN 2112 Introduction to the Culture of Spain. The main emphasis of this course will be on the reading and analysis of representative works of literature produced in Spain from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Some of the authors to be included for study and analysis are Miguel de Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos, Federico Garcia Lorca, and Miguel Delibes. Reading literary material and reporting back to the class in oral form will be the key activity for students in this course. Students will also be introduced in full to the specific and most effective ways of conducting research on Hispanic literatures. Lectures and seminars will be conducted in Spanish and students will be expected to actively contribute to discussions in the Spanish language.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jorge Paredes

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Students who complete this course will

    1) acquire an advanced knowledge and understanding of Spanish literature, culture and society.

    2) acquire the ability to independently use a variety of sources to further their understanding of Spanish literature.

    3) develop the capacity/ability to produce reports, essays and oral presentations on Spanish literature to strict timelines, both individually and as part of a group.

    4) gain the ability to work collaboratively with their peers and to communicate effectively with them.

    5) learn how to make effective use of the internet and other electronic resources when doing research on Spanish literature and culture.

    6) develop a positive attitude towards reading works of literature in Spanish throughout their life.
    7) be able to appreciate the cultural richness of Spanish and other foreign cultures.

    8) be capable of independently doing research on Spanish literature beyond the books, authors and periods covered in the course.

    9) develop the ability to synthesize, analyse and present information both in written and oral forms in a variety of formats, including oral presentations, written reports and formal essays.

    10) gain in-depth knowledge of some of the major works of Spanish literature from the 16th to the 20th Centuries.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 6, 7, 10
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 3, 9
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 2, 4, 8, 9
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 4
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 5
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 8
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    1. Lazarillo de Tormes (Anonimous)

    2. Doña Perfecta (Benito Pérez Galdós)

    3. El camino (Miguel Delibes)

    4. El silencio de las sirenas (Adelaida Garcia Morales)
    Recommended Resources
    Spanish Collins Dictionary.

    Internet access.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures supported by problem-solving tutorials which develop lecture material.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 2-hour lecture (or equivalent) per week 24 hours per semester
    1 x 1-hour tutorial (or equivalent) per week 12 hours per semester
    6 hours reading per week 72 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week 24 hours per semester
    2 hours assignment preparation per week 24 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Introduction to the course and the literary history of Spain
    Week 2 The 16th Century in Spain and the literature of the Golden Age
    Week 3 Introduction to El Lazarillo de Tormes: Author?
    Week 4 Analysis of El Lazarillo de Tormes
    Week 5 Introduction to the 19th Century in Spain
    Week 6 Analysis of Doña Perfecta
    Week 7 Introduction to 20th Century Spain
    Week 8 Analysis of Cinco horas con Mario
    Week 9 Analysis of Cinco horas con Mario
    Week 10 Introduction to Adelaida Garcia Morales
    Week 11 Analysis of El Silencio de las sirenas
    Week 12 Analysis of El Silencio de las sirenas
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Learning Outcome
    Tutorial participation Formative and Summative 10% 1-10
    Oral presentations Formative and Summative 20% 1-10
    Mid-semester test Formative and Summative 30% 1-10
    2000 word (in Spanish) final essay Formative and Summative 40% 1-10
    Assessment Detail
    Information available on enrolment.
    Submission
    Information available on enrolment.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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