PHYSIOL 3200 - Advanced Exercise Science

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2015

In this course, students will develop an advanced knowledge of exercise physiology with specific reference to exercise testing and prescription. Topics featured in the lecture series include the scientific principles of exercise prescription, methods of physiological assessment during exercise, exercise in special and clinical populations and exercise in extreme environments. Students will gain experience in conducting exercise tests and will complete a laboratory project where data collected during physiological assessments will be utilised to prescribe a relevant exercise programme specific to the individual. Finally, students will, in groups, partake in an analysis of exercise prescription for a specific clinical case study based upon published literature, which will be presented to staff at the end of semester.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PHYSIOL 3200
    Course Advanced Exercise Science
    Coordinating Unit Physiology
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 6 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites PHYSIOL 2510
    Assumed Knowledge HLTH 3100
    Course Description In this course, students will develop an advanced knowledge of exercise physiology with specific reference to exercise testing and prescription. Topics featured in the lecture series include the scientific principles of exercise prescription, methods of physiological assessment during exercise, exercise in special and clinical populations and exercise in extreme environments. Students will gain experience in conducting exercise tests and will complete a laboratory project where data collected during physiological assessments will be utilised to prescribe a relevant exercise programme specific to the individual. Finally, students will, in groups, partake in an analysis of exercise prescription for a specific clinical case study based upon published literature, which will be presented to staff at the end of semester.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Adrian Elliott

    Course Coordinator: Adrian Elliott
    Phone: +61 8 8313 3194
    Email: adrian.elliott@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Room S420a, Medical School South
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Describe the individual and integrated physiological responses to chronic exercise.
    2 Assess the physiological responses of an individual during exercise and apply this information to the design of a suitable and relevant advanced exercise program.
    3 Apply knowledge of the adaptations to chronic exercise to provide a rationale for the provision of exercise programs to improve and maintain specific aspects of health and performance.
    4 Design an exercise program that meets the needs of individuals in consideration of current, best-practice guidelines and the exercise capacity, tolerance and motivation of the individual.
    5 Recognise and understand the professional issues associated with the provision of exercise physiology services.
    6 Describe the influence of extreme environments on exercise training and performance.
    7 Evaluate the role of exercise training/rehabilitation in patients with chronic disease and recommend appropriate strategies to implement exercise as a therapeutic tool.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1-7
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1-4, 6-7
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 3, 4, 7
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 4, 7
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2, 4
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 4, 5, 7
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 4, 5, 7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    McArdle, Katch & Katch (2007) Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition and Human Performance (6th Ed). Lippincott, Wilkins & Wilkins
    Recommended Resources
    Farrell, Joyner & Carruzzo (2012). ACSM’S ADVANCED EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY. Lippincott, Wilkins & Wilkins

    ACSM’s Resource Manual for Guidelines for Exercise Testing & Prescription (7th Ed). Lippincott, Wilkins & Wilkins

    British Journal of Sports Medicine
    Journal of Applied Physiology
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
    Circulation
    Sports Medicine
    Journal of Science & Medicine in Sport
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    A blended teaching approach will be adopted for this course, in which a variety of e-lectures will be housed in MyUni to supplement the material covered during formal lectures. Furthermore, several short e-lectures will be obtained from experts in the field to provide specific information. Fortnightly practical and tutorial sessions will provide the opportunity for students to develop advanced skills relating to physiological assessments and specific case studies.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Semester Contact Hours (Lectures, Tutorials, Practicals & Exam): 51 Hours
    Assessment Tasks: 34 Hours
    Semester Non-Contact (Preparation, Reading, Revisions): 72 Hours
    TOTAL WORKLOAD: 12 Hours/Week
    Learning Activities Summary
    Week Lecture 1 Lecture 2
    Week 1 Exercise Training in the 21st Century Adaptations of Skeletal Muscle with Exercise
    Week 2 When the going gets tough -Fatigue during exercise Getting ‘fit’ – cardiovascular adjustments to exercise training
    Week 3 Getting ‘fit’ – the metabolic and hormonal adjustments to exercise training Running in the clouds - exercise at altitude
    Week 4 Training at Altitude Exercise when the temperature rises.
    Week 5 PAPER A EXAM Putting up the barriers – exercise and the immune system
    Week 6 Overtraining – too much of a good thing? Exercise throughout the Lifespan
    Week 7 The physiology of childhood exercise Exercise throughout the lifespan - Ageing
      Week 8 The dangers of sitting – physical inactivity & health. Identifying and modifying risk factors
    Week 9 Exercise when the heart fails Exercise and coronary heart disease
    Week 10 Exercise for the type II diabetic. Strengthening bones and joints – exercise & musculoskeletal disorders
    Week 11 Tackling the big issue – the role of exercise for the cancer patient Exercise for the brain
    Week 12 Considerations for the female exerciser Exercise during Pregnancy
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Examination (Papers A & B) Summative 50% 1-4, 6
    Laboratory Report Summative 30% 2, 3, 6, 7
    Group Presentation Summative 15% 1, 3, 6, 7
    Tutorial Quiz Summative 5% 5, 7
    Assessment Detail
    Final Exam (50%)
    Will cover all lecture and tutorial material as a major summative component of the course assessment.

    Laboratory Portfolio (30%) 1800 words
    Students required to work in groups of 5-6 where they will conduct 4 appropriate physiological tests and a health screening exercise on a volunteer during their laboratory classes. This will be evidenced in an individually written laboratory report consisting of a 500 word section for their testing rationale and background, a 500 word section detailing the results of their testing and comparisons with normative data, and a 500 word interpretation for exercise programme design.

    Group Poster (15%)
    In groups 5-6, students will present a case study in poster format with oral presentation. The case will be from a particular clinical population pre-assigned by academic staff. Of particular interest will be the disease aetiology and exercise recommendations based upon scientific literature.

    Tutorials (5%)
    Four tutorials relating to 1) ethics and indemnity in exercise testing, 2) health and safety during exercise testing, 3) calculation of exercise intensities and 4) pre-participation health screening. Each will require the reading of brief documents followed by a short online quiz.
    Submission
    1. Staff will clearly indicate the deadline (date and time) for coursework submission in the course information contained within MyUni. In addition, assessment deadlines will be announced via MyUni at least 7 days prior to the submission deadline.
    2. Unless otherwise indicated, coursework should be submitted electronically via MyUni. Any students experiencing technical difficulties should contact the course coordinator and MSTRC staff at the earliest opportunity.
    3. Coursework received after the deadline will be penalised as follows:

    30% of total available points will be penalised per day (24 hour period or fraction thereof). An automatic zero mark will be applied after 3 days.
    For example, coursework submitted less than 24 hours late and marked as a 75% would become a 45% (i.e. a 30% penalty). A 55% grade would become 25%.

    4. All assessment submitted by the deadline will be marked and returned within 14 days of submission.
    5. Any student, who wishes to receive an extension to a coursework deadline, must notify the course coordinator prior to the deadline. The course coordinator may use his/her discretion in granting an extension and, if required, request supporting documentation.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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