HLTH SC 3100 - Exercise, Nutrition & Metabolism

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

This course concerns analysis of normal diet and the effects of modification nutrient consumption and how this impacts on skeletal muscle metabolism during exercise of different types (resistance vs endurance training), length and severity (intensity). Changes in diet have a profound influence on performance during exercise as well as the physiological adaptations that occur due to longer term exercise training. This course will outline these responses and adaptations to endurance and resistance exercise training. Macronutrient 9fat and carbohydrate) intake will effect fuel utilisation during exercise. This course will encourage students to explore these concepts enabling a better understanding of muscle function during exercise. This course will define skeletal miuscle fatigue together with the effects of a variety of nutritional supplements and ergogenic aids on fatigue and performance during exercise. Furthermore, fundamental aspects of human thermoregulation, fluid and electrolyte balance in exercise and sport will be a module in this course. During this course, students will be able to apply this knowledge by designing basic nutritional plans and advice to enhance human exercise performance. Students will be provided with basic counselling skills to provide appropriate practical dietary and nutritional therapeutic advice.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HLTH SC 3100
    Course Exercise, Nutrition & Metabolism
    Coordinating Unit School of Medical Sciences
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Prerequisites PHYSIOL 2510
    Course Description This course concerns analysis of normal diet and the effects of modification nutrient consumption and how this impacts on skeletal muscle metabolism during exercise of different types (resistance vs endurance training), length and severity (intensity). Changes in diet have a profound influence on performance during exercise as well as the physiological adaptations that occur due to longer term exercise training. This course will outline these responses and adaptations to endurance and resistance exercise training. Macronutrient 9fat and carbohydrate) intake will effect fuel utilisation during exercise. This course will encourage students to explore these concepts enabling a better understanding of muscle function during exercise. This course will define skeletal miuscle fatigue together with the effects of a variety of nutritional supplements and ergogenic aids on fatigue and performance during exercise. Furthermore, fundamental aspects of human thermoregulation, fluid and electrolyte balance in exercise and sport will be a module in this course. During this course, students will be able to apply this knowledge by designing basic nutritional plans and advice to enhance human exercise performance. Students will be provided with basic counselling skills to provide appropriate practical dietary and nutritional therapeutic advice.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr David Bentley

    Course Coordinator: Dr David Bentley
    Email: david.bentley@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Level 4, Medical School North
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Lecture
    Monday 12pm - 1pm Engineering Sth, S111, Lecture Theatre

    Practical
    Thursday 10am - 1pm Medical School Sth, S419, Practical Room
    Thursday 1pm - 4pm Medical School Sth, S414, Practical Room

    Tutorial
    Tuesday 1pm - 2pm Hughes, 322, Lecture Room
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 To outline the physiological responses and adaptations to exercise following dietary macronutrient intervention.
    2 To write and evaluative report on dietary intake and physical activity level for an active or sedentary person.
    3 To use advanced techniques in kinanthropometry to analyse and interpret human physique and body composition relative to energy balance
    4 To critically evaluate the scientific evidence concerning the effects on exercise physiological function and performance by common dietary interventions, micronutrient or supplement intake.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 2-3
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1, 4
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 4
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 3
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Sport and Exercise Nutrition (4th edition). McArdle WD, Katch FI and Katch VL (eds). Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
    Recommended Resources
    Department of Sports Nutrition, Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) http://www.ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrition

    The Gatorade Sports Science Institute
    http://www.gssiweb.com/
    Online Learning
    All lecture, tutorial and practical materials will be housed on myuni. Electronic lectures including imbedded video, audio narration and quiz will offered via articulate storyline productions. These electronic resources will be used to support face to face practical and tutorial experiences and for formative assessment.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Face to face classes
    Face to face sessions are scheduled for 12 noon-1pm on Mondays in Engineering Sth, S111 (‘lecture’), Lecture Theatre and 1-2pm on Tuesday Hughes, 322, Lecture Room (‘tutorial’).
    Lecture/tutorial notes and related material will be available on line at www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au.

    The tutorial sessions will be designed to generate discussion and clarify topics covered in the lectures/e modules and present case study scenarios enabling you to discuss and apply knowledge introduced in face to face lectures and online content (see below) .

    Online content
    As a requirement for this course and in preparation for the face to face and practical sessions, completion of online task will be required. These tasks will be directly linked to the face to face and practical content of the week. The online content will introduce students with the basic information that will required in order to successfully attend the face to face and practical classes The online content will comprise either viewing of an electronic lecture and/or completion of a survey/quiz. Reading of the textbook or a designated journal article is expected for you to gain wider and deeper knowledge and understanding of the week’s theme.

    Practical classes
    Practical classes are scheduled for 10am-1pm and 1-4pm on Thursday in Medical School Sth S419. The aim of the practical classes is to provide you with practical skills related to Nutrition and Exercise measurement to compliment the theoretical course material. The skills introduced and practiced in the practical classes will be used for the purpose of completing the major assignment related to dietary assessment and provision of dietary advice for a real person (see assessment requirements). In addition, discussion and guidance on a small group discovery project will be completed.

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from the Course Planner.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students will be required to complete the online task (1hr per week) at home. In addition preparation for the practical and tutorial classes (1hr per week) will be required. This allocated time is in addition to the 5 contact hours per week of face to face lecture, tutorial and practical classes. Preparation for the assignment (10hrs); discovery project (20 hrs) submissions and final exam preperation (40 hrs) will also be required.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Week E-module Lecture Tutorial Practical
    Week 1 Principles of diet and nutrition Diet Analysis Measuring the nutritional status of a human 1 Nutritional assessment and analysis
    Week 2 Nutrition, energy transformation and exercise None Measuring the nutritional status of a human 2 Measurement of mechanical work during exercise (including lecture ‘spectrum of energy during exercise’)
    Week 3 Exercise responses and adaptations Overview of energy release during exercise Micronutrients /principles of ergogenic aids supplements Assignment data collection
    Week 4 Human physique measurement Body composition assessment Small group Project development 1 Body composition assessment
    Week 5 Principles of good eating Nutrition for the physically active person Diet analysis case study discussion: optimal nutrition for exercising people Assignment Data collection
    (body composition)
    Week 6 Energy value of food Energy expenditure at rest and during exercise Small group Project development 2 Basal metabolism
    Week 7 Energy release from carbohydrate Carbohydrate and fat metabolism during exercise Predicting energy expenditure during exercise

    Metabolic calculations
    Exercise metabolism and
    indirect calorimetry
    Week 8 Metabolic fatigue during exercise Importance of carbohydrate for exercise and fatigue Fatigue and Carbohydrate supplementation and endurance performance Carbohydrate consumption exercise and fatigue
    Week 9 Temperature regulation and fluid balance Fluid balance and exercise performance Small group Project development 3 Monitoring fluid loss during exercise
    Week 10 Protein metabolism and exercise Resistance training and protein Exercise muscle mass, diet elderly Assessing lipid quality in the diet
    Week 11 Fat metabolism at rest and during exercise High fat diets and exercise performance Dietary fat composition Acute metabolic responses to
    high fat feeding
    Week 12 Obesity and health risk Energy balance and weight control Extreme and fad diets Student Presentations
    Week 13 Disordered eating None Optimal body weight and sport Student Presentations
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Students will be required to produce and present (document and presentation in week 12 or 13) a small group discovery project. Students will be assigned a general theme related to exercise, nutrition and metabolism they will be guided on developing an appropriate research question and produce a comprehensive literature review and research proposal in the area of choice. Specific discovery project sessions will be held in week 4,6 and 9.The project will completed in groups of 5 and be presented to the class as a 20 min presentation where formative assessment will be made. Students will then submit a 4000 word report for assessment.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Quiz Formative 10% 1
    Report Summative 20% 2-3
    Project Summative 30% 4
    Final Exam Summative 40% 1-4
    Assessment Detail
    Quiz
    Six quiz will offered via articulate storyline productions. The quiz will be used to support face to face practical and tutorial experiences and for formative assessment.


    Report
    Students will be required to obtain data concerning the nutrient intake/physical characteristics of an athletic or non athletic person. They will use this data to compile a written report outlining the data and offering recommendations to the client using an evidence based approach. The composition of the assignments will be guided throughout the semester with feedback offered in the initial stages of the semester and upon completion of the first case report.

    Project
    Students will be required to produce and present (document and presentation in week 12 or 13) a small group discovery project. Students will be assigned a general theme related to exercise, nutrition and metabolism they will be guided on developing an appropriate research question and produce a comprehensive literature review and research proposal in the area of choice. Specific discovery project sessions will be held in week 4,6 and 9.The project will completed in groups of 5 and be presented to the class as a 20 min presentation where formative assessment will be made. Students will then submit a 4000 word report for assessment.

    Final exam
    Final exam will cover all lecture and practical material. The exam will focus very much on applied and practical aspects of the course. Questions will be based around formative quiz delivered throughout the semester.
    Submission
    All written assignments (report and project) will be submitted and outcome relased via turnitin. Students will be unable to submit any report via turnitin after the due date has closed. Penalties for late submission of assignments – In cases where an extension has NOT been granted, the following penalties will apply:
    • For assignments submitted after the due date, a penalty of 50% of the maximum marks available for that assignment will be incurred.
    • Assignments received two (2) or more days after the due time/date will not be allocated a mark, however, these assignments must still be submitted to pass the unit.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

    Supplementary examinations in Exercise, nutrition and metabolism are ORAL exams conducted by a panel of at least two assessors. NO written examination is available. They will only be conducted during the formal supplementary examination period.
  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.