HLTH SC 3200 - Life Span Nutrition

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2018

This course investigates how nutrition requirements and challenges change throughout the human lifecycle and how alteration in nutritional requirements impact on human health. The course will begin by investigating the influence of nutrition prior to and during conception. Students will then be taught about the importance of good maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation and the impact of poor nutritional balance on fetal and infant development and maternal health. The course will cover the assessment of normal growth and body development during childhood and adolescence and will conclude with a full review of current literature and research on nutrient needs and factors affecting the nutritional status of adults and the elderly. The section on adult nutrition aims to address the role of nutrition in causing and preventing degenerative diseases and the nutritional, physiological, metabolic and sociological determinants of obesity. On completion of the course students will be able to critically assess nutritional requirements and nutritional health in accordance with ontogenic status. In addition they will have the knowledge both to develop and critique nutritional interventions designed to improve human health and well-being at specific age associated time points.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HLTH SC 3200
    Course Life Span Nutrition
    Coordinating Unit Medicine
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites HLTH SC 2100
    Assumed Knowledge PHYSIOL 2520
    Course Description This course investigates how nutrition requirements and challenges change throughout the human lifecycle and how alteration in nutritional requirements impact on human health. The course will begin by investigating the influence of nutrition prior to and during conception. Students will then be taught about the importance of good maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation and the impact of poor nutritional balance on fetal and infant development and maternal health. The course will cover the assessment of normal growth and body development during childhood and adolescence and will conclude with a full review of current literature and research on nutrient needs and factors affecting the nutritional status of adults and the elderly. The section on adult nutrition aims to address the role of nutrition in causing and preventing degenerative diseases and the nutritional, physiological, metabolic and sociological determinants of obesity. On completion of the course students will be able to critically assess nutritional requirements and nutritional health in accordance with ontogenic status. In addition they will have the knowledge both to develop and critique nutritional interventions designed to improve human health and well-being at specific age associated time points.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Nichola Thompson

    Course Coordinator: Dr Nichola Thompson
    Phone: +61 8 8313 6395
    Email: nichola.thompson@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Room N404a, Medical School North


    Tutor: Dr Mark Gibson
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5337
    Email: mark.gibson@adelaide.edu.au

    Tutor: Dr Elizabeth Beckett
    Email: elizabeth.beckett@adelaide.edu.au


    Medical Sciences School Office
    Phone: +61 8 8313 0530
    Email: medicalsciences@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Level 4, Medical School South

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 To apply knowledge of the science of nutrition to human health across the lifespan.
    2 To retrieve, critically evaluate and apply scientific evidence to a contemporary nutritional health issue.
    3 To assess and compare diet and nutritional requirements relative to age, developmental and disease status.
    4 To formulate a dietry intervention plan to address nutritional deficiencies or excesses according to the health needs of individuals relative to age, developmental and disease status.
    5 Apply collaboration and team work skills through shared learning in nutritional disease topics.
    6 Demonstrate communication skills through presentation and discussion of nutritional disease topics.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2,3,4,6
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1-6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    4-6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    NUTRITION THROUGH THE LIFE CYCLE Judith E. Brown fourth edition ISBN 978-0-538-733410

    Textbook with links to website resources at www.cengage.com for further information and individual learning and self-assessment:

    DIET ANALYSIS+TM SOFTWARE, 2-Semester Printed Access Card, 10th Edition
    ISBN 9780538495080 This software is accessed on line and can be purchased separately at http://www.cengagebrain.com.au/shop/en/AU/storefront/australia?cmd=CLHeaderSearch&fieldValue=9780170167253

    A CD version 9 of this software also exists but it does not work well with recent operating systems. Students may use this CD instead of the online version at their own risk. Help is NOT available if problems develop with the CD software.

    Items 1 and 2 can be purchased at reduced price at unibooks

    A guide to using the software can be found at the following link
    http://cengagesites.com/academic/assets/sites/4004/111139928X_Diet_Analysis_Plus_Student_Guide.pdf
    Recommended Resources
    Understanding Normal & Clinical Nutrition, 8th Edition - Rolfes, Pinna & Whitney. Wadsworth American version of the required textbook containing extra chapters on nutrition over the lifespan and in diseases
    There are a wide range of reputable nutrition orientated web sites:
    Australian sites include:

    Nutrition and Diet including Nutrient reference values for Australia and New Zealand http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/publications/subjects/nutrition.htm
    Food labels: www.foodstandards.gov.au
    Australian Guide to Healthy Eating: www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/health-pubhlth-strateg-food-guide-index.htm
    Therapeutic Goods Administration: www.tga.gov.au
    Diabetes Australia: www.diabetesaustralia.com.au
    Heart Foundation: www.heartfoundation.org.au
    Cancer Council: www.cancercouncil.com.au
    Dietitians Association: www.daa.asn.au

    Healthy Eating pyramid: http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/national/resource/healthy-living-pyramid
    Food pyramids for ethic groups: www.oldwayspt.org
    Healthy eating tips: www.gofor2and5.com.au
    Online Learning
    MYUNI

    Additional course-related material will become available through MyUni.

    Communications about the course will be via the Announcements section on MyUni and/or by email (using your student university email address). Please read the Announcements section and your email regularly to keep up to date.

    Course information, such as timetables, lecture and resource session notes, information on assignments and assignments themselves, assignment cover sheets, and various other learning resources will also be posted on MyUni. Please familiarise yourselves with the different sections and information available on MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    LECTURE SESSIONS

    There will be two lecture sessions per week commencing promptly at 10 minutes past the hour and lasting for 40 to 50 minutes.

    A lecture will be presented in most sessions. Lecture notes will be available online at www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au. No printed handouts will be distributed at lectures. Most lectures will be recorded and be available for download from Myuni soon after each lecture.

    If you do not understand any part of a lecture, please ask for clarification from the lecturer either during the lecture, afterwards or via email.

    Lecture notes only aim to provide an outline of a topic. Further reading of the textbook and journal articles on line is expected to supplement the lecture information.

    TUTORIALS

    There will be one tutorial session per week, on most weeks, commencing promptly at 10 minutes past the hour and lasting for 40 to 50 minutes. The format will vary but most will review and discuss recent lectures. The format may include nutritional case studies, answering and discussing pre-prepared written questions, discussion of candidate exam questions and/or informal multiple choice quizzes using Turning point and remote “clickers” to assess the class’s responses.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students are reminded that the overall workload for a full time student as stated in the University of Adelaide Calendar is an average of 48 hours per week per teaching period (i.e. semester). This includes contact and noncontact hours and includes general study and research time for assignments.

    Lifespan Nutrition is a 3 unit course and thus represents a quarter of a full time load. You should thus be putting in an average of 12 hours of study each week (including contact hours) for this course.

    Each week you are expected to
    • attend teaching sessions
    • work on assignments
    • read relevant sections of textbooks and review learning and knowledge online that relate to lecture ensuring that you understand the information, and taking additional notes as necessary.
    Learning Activities Summary

    Week

    Topic

    Lecture

    Week 1

    Overview of lifespan Nutrition and Nutrition and fertility

    1. Overview of topics

    2. Fertility

    Week 2

    Variation in nutritional requirements during pregnancy

    1. Pregnancy

    2. Nutritional diseases during pregnancy

    Week 3

    Developmental origins or adult nutritional disease

    Lactation, breast milk composition and infant formula

    1. Developmental origins of disease

    2. Lactation

    Week 4

    Infant and childhood nutritional requirements

    1. Prematurity and early life

    2. Childhood nutrition in Australia

    Week 5

    Adolescent nutrition, puberty and diseases of adolescence including eating disorders

    1. Adolescent nutrition

    2. Eating disorders

    Week 6

    Diabetes melitius, energy regulation and storage.

    1. Type I diabetes

    2. Type II diabetes and insulin resistance

    Week 7

    Anaemia and iron regulation disorders.

    1. Anaemia

    Week 8

    Cancer links with nutrition and cancer treatments.

    1. Cancer

    2. Cancer and chemotherapy research

    Week 9

    Obesity and bariatric surgery Bone regulation and nutritional disease including osteoporosis.

    1. Bariatric surgery

    2. Bones

    Week 10

    Interactions between pharmaceuticals and nutrients

    Women’s health; including menopause, premenstrual syndrome, breast cancer

    1. Drug food interactions

    2. Women’s health

    Week 11

    Men’s health and nutrition; low sperm counts, prostate cancer, erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

    Impact of the aging body on nutritional absorption and requirements. Assessing nutritional deficiencies in the elderly, cognitive decline and poor nutrition.

    1. Men’s Health

    2. Nutrition and the aging population

    Week 12

    Group presentations on causes and treatment of nutritional diseases including pancreatitis, hepatic steatosis, Gout, hypercholesterolemia

     

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Online mini-tests Formative 0% 1-4
    Solo assignment Summative 25% 1-3
    Group assignment Summative 25% 1-6
    Mid-semester exam Summative 10% 1-4
    Final examination Summative 40% 1-4
    Assessment Related Requirements
    PASSING THE COURSE
    To successfully pass the course students must achieve all of the following criteria:

    *To receive a combined mark of 45% or higher for theory Mid Semester exam and Final exam.
    *Submit a literature review completed to a satisfactory standard
    *Contribute to a group research wiki and present a group presentation.

    Any student not meeting these hurdle requirements will not be eligible to pass the course, regardless of performance in other components.

    Please note the School of Medical Sciences policy that assessments handed in late to 3rd year courses will receive a penalty of 30% of the mark for each day late, with a mark of zero after 3 days. Any potential difficulties in meeting assessment deadlines should be discussed in good time with the course coordinator.

    The maximum number of total marks available for the semester is 100 marks,
    Each of your assessment components tasks will be adjusted to show your actual marks earned towards the final total mark.
    Assessment Detail
    EXAMINATIONS (5O% OF FINAL MARKS)

    The theory examination component will be split up to 2 separate examinations.
    The first paper A will be represent 10% of your total marks and will be held approximately half way through the semester covering lecture and tutorial material until this time point. This paper will be conducted under examination conditions take approximately 40 minutes with 10minutes reading time.
    Students will be provided with feedback on their performance as a mark of progress and understanding of the course content.

    The final examination will represent 40% of your total mark and take place during the official end of semester examination period. The final examination will comprise a 2hour written examination paper with an additional 10 minutes reading time. The examination will aim to examine the depth of a student’s understanding of the topics that have been covered during the semester. To do well in the exam students are encouraged to read widely on the topics and study, rather than just learning lecture handouts.

    Both examinations will be comprised of short answer questions. Marks for individual questions will be stated on the examination paper.
    Additional sample mini-tests will be available online periodically through the semester for formative assessments of learning.

    Two assignments will be made available on MyUni during the semester that need to be completed by the due dates.


    ASSIGNMENT 1
    Students required to submit a 3000 word literature review which will be written individually on an assigned nutrition topic. The primary focus of the literature review will be to present the students own interpretive summary of the current published research literature of the topic. The topic will focus on pathology and disease outcomes of poor nutrition.

    Students should write the review in the form of a journal article and
    a) Summarise the background literature they think is relevant to understanding the current levels of knowledge in the field
    b) Identify what the potential significance of the research findings are in relation to further nutritional research.

    GUIDELINES
    A marking rubric will be provided and should be closely reviewed prior to the beginning of your literature review. The rubric will provide a guide on how marks will be allocated for this task. The criteria should be followed to ensure that the work meets the standards required for this assessment.

    CITED REFERENCES
    Correct referencing and citation is an important feature of scientific writing so we require all assignments to be submitted using a standard form of referencing and citation. You can use any accepted style so long as it is consistent throughout the review. Most scientific journals describe their standard format on the webpage. We recommend you use the Harvard format.


    ASSIGNMENT 2
    For the second assignment students will work in small teams. Each team of students will be assigned a nutritional disease. Students will be work to discuss the nutritional causes of the disease, write a typical case study describing the dietry habits, weight and health profile of a typical sufferer of the nutritional disease and provide basic nutritional advice for the suffer of the disease. This case study will be presented on line in the form of a wiki. Students will also work to produce a poster displaying their research and take part in a group presentation of their work.

    Students will be allocated into groups and organisation of groups and allocation of tasks should commence as early as possible and fully utilise the mid-semester break. Overall 11 weeks will be allocated for assignment 2, including 6 weeks for literature searching on the disease and nutritional planning, 3 further weeks for preparation of the report, poster and presentation.

    GROUP ORAL PRESENTATIONS
    Group presentations are scheduled to take place in week 12 of the course. All groups must attend the full poster and presentation session on the day.

    The assignments aim to assess understanding of nutritional research, the principles of dietary analysis, nutritional disease and practical adjustment of food intake in accordance with altered nutritional requirements.
    Submission
    ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSIONS POLICY

    Assignment 1 should be submitted on myuni through TURNITIN in pdf. format by 12noon on the deadline day. A school of medical sciences cover sheet should be signed and dated and submitted with the assignment. This cover sheet is available in the course assignment folder on myuni.

    A hard copy of both documents should also be submitted to the Medical Science Teaching Resource Centre (MSTRC) on Level 4 of Medical School South by 5pm on the same day.

    Please note the School of Medical Sciences policy that assessments handed in late to 3rd year courses will receive a penalty of 30% of the mark for each day late, with a mark of zero after 3 days. Any potential difficulties in meeting assessment deadlines should be discussed in good time with the course coordinator. Extensions for assignment 1 will only be granted in accordance with University of Adelaide policy. http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/supps.html


    Assignment 2 will be marked following deadline from the myuni wiki pages. No extensions will be granted for assignment 2.

    REPLACEMENT SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMS POLICY

    This applies to ALL exams, including those held during class, not just those at the end of semester exam period

    (1) Students seeking a replacement examination must refer to the University policy. The policy and an application form can be downloaded from the following site: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/supps.html

    (2) Requests for replacement examinations should be made by submission of the completed form and supporting documentation to the Medical Sciences Teaching Resource Centre, Medical School South, level 4 within 5 working days of the date of the examination. The application will then be considered by the School of Medical Sciences Examinations Committee who will decide the outcome based on the materials provided by the student in support of their application and in line with the policies of both the University and the Faculty of Health Sciences.

    (3) The School Examinations Committee will not approve applications for supplementary examinations where the nature of the illness is considered minor. This decision cannot be made where no evidence is provided as to the severity of the illness. We strongly respect the right of students to keep the specific nature of their illness confidential. However, the new University Policy on Replacement exams requires your medical practitioner to complete sections 3 and 4 of the appropriate form (see http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/mod_arrange.html) certifying that they considered your illness to be major. Replacement examinations cannot be approved without this certification (i.e. on the basis of a medical certificate alone). Students are strongly advised to take a copy of this form with them for completion by their medical practitioner at the time of their consultation.

    SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING ACADEMIC SUPPS: Academic supps cannot be applied for. They may be offered at the discretion of the Discipline of Physiology examinations committee, to permit students to re-sit if their overall performance was close to the required level (45% average standard).
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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