PLANT SC 3510WT - Plant Health III

Waite Campus - Semester 1 - 2021

This course covers the biology, ecology and management of a variety of pests in agricultural, horticultural and viticultural ecosystems, especially arthropods, plant pathogens and weeds. It considers what organisms and abiotic stresses cause disease or reduced growth, and the economic, environmental and social implications of disease and stress. Cultural, biological, physical, and chemical pest suppression practices are considered within the framework of the principles of integrated pest management (IPM). Practical sessions provide an opportunity to learn techniques and approaches to plant protection. The key concepts of the course are integrated in a series of case studies, and students enhance their ability to apply them to novel situations in problem-solving sessions.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PLANT SC 3510WT
    Course Plant Health III
    Coordinating Unit School of Agriculture, Food and Wine
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Waite Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 6 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible PLANT SC 3131WT
    Assumed Knowledge BIOLOGY 1202 and, PLANT SC 2500WT or OENOLOGY 2501WT
    Course Description This course covers the biology, ecology and management of a variety of pests in agricultural, horticultural and viticultural ecosystems, especially arthropods, plant pathogens and weeds. It considers what organisms and abiotic stresses cause disease or reduced growth, and the economic, environmental and social implications of disease and stress. Cultural, biological, physical, and chemical pest suppression practices are considered within the framework of the principles of integrated pest management (IPM). Practical sessions provide an opportunity to learn techniques and approaches to plant protection. The key concepts of the course are integrated in a series of case studies, and students enhance their ability to apply them to novel situations in problem-solving sessions.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jerome Buhl

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Successful students will be able to:

    1.  Diagnose causes of plant damage, especially by pests, and identify the agent responsible.

    2.  Explain the influence of biological and ecological processes on (a) pest populations and (b) the outcomes of pest management practices and programs.

    3.  Apply an understanding of the practices available to manage insects, diseases and weeds.

    4.  Create an integrated management program and explain the benefits and limitations of its components.

    5.  Make informed decisions about pest management practices based on appropriate sampling of pest populations and interpreting sampling data.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 3, 4, 5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    3, 4, 5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    3,4
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    3, 4, 5
  • Learning Resources
    Online Learning
    All course materials are available online through the University’s MyUni portal.   These include the course handbook, lecture and practical notes, recorded lectures, and example of a past examination paper, and lists of readings.  Each week students must complete an online quiz to prepare for the scheduled practical session.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures are supported by assigned readings that build student’s knowledge in the area of pest biology and management. The hands-on learning approach in the practicals helps to develop deeper understanding of these topics and assists students in their development of practical skills such as diagnosis, robust sampling and resistance management.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    A student enrolled in a 3 unit course, such as this, should expect to spend, on average 12 hours per week on the studies required. This includes both the formal contact time required to the course (e.g., lectures and practicals), as well as non-contact time (e.g., reading and revision).
    Learning Activities Summary
    A series of lectures covers the influence of damaging microorganisms, invertebrates and weeds on plant health, and ways to manage plant health in a cost effective and sustainable manner. Practical sessions consider diagnosis, quantification and management of organisms that damage crops in the field and after harvest. A workshop session allows the students to discuss the future of pest management with a panel of experts.
    Specific Course Requirements
    1.  Attendance at lectures is optional, but strongly encouraged.

    2.  Attendance at practicals is required, and all practical sessions are assessed.   Students must complete an online quiz before each practical, which gives formative feedback and ensures they are aware of key technical, health and safety issues.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Due to the current COVID-19 situation modified arrangements have been made to assessments to facilitate remote learning and teaching.

    Assessment task

    Type of Assessment

    (formative/summative)

    Percentage of total assessment for grading purposes

    Hurdle Yes or No

    Course learning outcomes being assessed / achieved

    (Should be no more than 3)

    Approximate timing of assessment

    (week of teaching period)

    Practical exam ( plant health diagnosis)

    Summative

    16

    No

    1

    4

    IPM design project

    Formative & Summative

    28

    No

    3,4,5

    5,9,11

    Sampling practical report (group)

    Formative & Summative

    6

    No

    5

    6

    Resistance management practical report

    Formative & Summative

    5

    No

    3, 4

    7

    2 x in-practical reports (group)

    Formative & Summative

    6

    No

    3

    8,10

    2 x online practical/workshop quizzes

    Summative

    6

    No

    1,2,3

    10,11,12

    Revision and pre-practical online quizzes

    Formative

    0

    No

    1,2,5

    1-12

    Final exam

    Summative

    33

    No

    1,2,5

    Semester 1 exam period

    Assessment Related Requirements

    Assessment Item with Hurdle or compulsory component

    % needed to meet hurdle or requirement to meet compulsory component

    Is additional assessment available if student does not meet hurdle requirement or compulsory component, if no please explain

    If additional assessment is available, explain what type

    Practical, field trip and workshops sessions are compulsory

    Satisfactory completion of all practicals. field trips and workshops

    Yes

    Missed sessions can be made up

    Assessment Detail
    - Practical exam (16%)
    Students examine a range of damage cause by plant pathogens, invertebrate pests and herbicides which they saw in the related practical sessions. Students are assessed on their ability to assess the problem, identify the information required to make an informed judgement about the cause of the problem and possible remedial action, and to communicate that information.

    -Integrated Pest Management design (28%)
    Students will work in groups to produce an initial pitch video (6%), have the opportunity to submit a draft of an individual design essay draft for feedback before its submission worth 22%.
    Small groups of students prepare and submit a short initial pitch video to explain the problem that they will be solving by designing an IPM program which they will later present in the individual essay. Students will be assessed, as a group, with regards to the quality and reasoning of their pitch and their ability to communicate their ideas. Students will then submit a draft of their IPM design essay where the main sections will appear as bullet points. They will then receive feedback and advice to inform the preparation of their IPM design essay. For the essay, students will design an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program and describe it in a 3,000-word essay (range 2,800-3,000, excluding references). The students choose a particular crop and location and describe particular challenges and problems associated with it. They then describe their solution, i.e. the different steps required to establish and enact their IPM program in order to manage, in a sustainable and economical manner, the complex of pests threatening the crop.

    - Sampling practical report (6%)
    Small group of students analyse and interpret an extensive class data set that is collected during a field excursion. Students are assessed on the precision and accuracy of their work and the quality and depth of answers to questions about the exercise.

    - Pesticide resistance management practical report (5%)
    Students prepare a four-page report on the results of a computer simulation. Students are assessed on their ability to analyse and communicate the results of the simulation and the quality and depth of their answers to questions about the results of the simulation.

    -2 x In-practical group reports (6%)
    Biological control of insects (3%)
    Small groups of students prepare a brief written report (~2 pages) on observations made in the field and of live specimens that they view in the laboratory. Students are assessed on the quality and depth of answers to questions about their observations.
    Postharvest pest management (3%)
    Students work in groups to discover the elements of a chosen supply chain, determine the key pest control points and then apply their knowledge to develop a method that will maintain or improve the end product. This is then presented to the class as an informal hand-drawn poster/diagram. They choose a crop and product of interest to them (horticultural, agricultural or viticultural) the week before the practical to allow them time to identify resources (textbooks, websites journal articles) in preparation. Students will be assessed, as a group, with regards to the quality, reasoning and depth of the analysis and solutions presented, and their ability to communicate their poster and ideas to the class.


    -Online practical/workshop quizzes (6%)
    Pesticide chemistry and application (3%)
    Students answer an online quiz on the results of four short experiments. Students are assessed on their analysis and interpretation of experimental data, and quality and depth of answers to questions about their observations.
    Soil-borne disease diagnosis (3%)
    Students are presented with results of analyses of previously-collected soil samples by the SARDI Molecular Diagnostics Centre and are asked a series of multiple choice questions and short answer questions to interpret these results and make recommendations as to how to use this information in the management of soil-borne diseases.


    -Online quizzes (0%)
    Pre-practical quizzes: for some practical sessions students will complete a pre-class online quiz. It tests student preparation and is based on the instructions and short videos on that particular topic. By completing the quiz, students can be confident that they are well-prepared for the practical session. Students may be excluded from a practical session if they do not successfully complete the practical quiz. However, there is no mark for these quizzes.
    Revision quizzes: each week students will have the option of attempting online revision quizzes which will test their knowledge and understanding about the topics covered during the lectures. There are no marks for these quizzes.

    -Theory Exam (33%)
    The final theory exam will examine all components of the course. It will consist of multiple choice, short answer and long answer questions.
    Submission
    Late Submission:

    If an extension is not applied for, or not granted then a penalty for late submission will apply. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for each calendar day that the assignment is late (i.e. weekends count as 2 days), up to a maximum of 50% of the available marks will be applied. This means that an assignment that is 5 days late or more without an approved extension can only receive a maximum of 50% of the marks available for that assignment.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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