DESST 1506 - Design Studio II

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2018

This course further develops design as a speculative process of inquiry and experimentation. It involves knowledge acquisition and the continuing development of skills to conceptualise, resolve and present well reasoned architectural ideas through drawing, physical and digital modelling and laboratory sessions. The course also continues development of techniques of analysis and critique of design outcomes and engineering principles. Students will learn to design through iterative processes integrating critically observed aspects of the built environment. Material to be interrogated through the processes include: site, precedent, human scale, structural engineering principles and material and physical data. Rhino will be introduced in this course.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code DESST 1506
    Course Design Studio II
    Coordinating Unit School of Architecture and Built Environment
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 6 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Assumed Knowledge DESST 1504 or DESST 1029
    Restrictions Available to B.ArchDes and B.E(Arch) students only
    Quota A quota will apply
    Course Description This course further develops design as a speculative process of inquiry and experimentation. It involves knowledge acquisition and the continuing development of skills to conceptualise, resolve and present well reasoned architectural ideas through drawing, physical and digital modelling and laboratory sessions. The course also continues development of techniques of analysis and critique of design outcomes and engineering principles.

    Students will learn to design through iterative processes integrating critically observed aspects of the built environment. Material to be interrogated through the processes include: site, precedent, human scale, structural engineering principles and material and physical data. Rhino will be introduced in this course.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Ms Mirai Morita

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Lectures are on Mondays 3-5pm Engineering Nth, N158, Chapman Lecture Theatre. Tutorials are on Tues/Wed in Union House 432, Margaret Murray Room. Workshops (wk 3,4,10,11) are on Mondays in Arch computer suite.

    Wk01 23/7   Mon   Lecture  Course introduction
             24/7   T/W   Tutorial  Making surface stand and hold (Small Group Discovery)

    Wk02 30/7   Mon   Lecture  spatial experience
             31/7   T/W   Tutorial  site model building

    Wk03 06/8   Mon   Wrkshp  Introduction to Rhino
             07/8   T/W   Tutorial  creating site in Rhino < in computer lab

    Wk04 13/8   Mon   Wrkshp  more tools in Rhino
             14/8   T/W   Tutorial  creating project in Rhino / Ass1a due < in computer lab

    Wk05 20/8   Mon   Lecture  structure: Speaker Nick Roach
             21/8   T/W   Tutorial  creating digital in physical

    Wk06 27/8   Mon   Lecture  Meaning and Emotion: Speaker Drew Joyce
             28/8   T/W   Tutorial  Ass1b due > discussion

    Wk07 03/9   Mon   Lecture  Making digital and physical: Speaker TBD
             04/9   T/W   Tutorial  developing surface into space < in computer lab

    Wk08 10/9   Mon   Lecture  Expression: Speaker Margit Bruenner
             11/9   T/W   Tutorial  constructing surface into space < indiv consultation sign up

    Mid-Semester Break

    Wk09 01/10   Mon - Holiday
             02/10   T/W   Tutorial  Ass2 due > discussion

    Wk10 08/10   Mon   Wrkshp  finalizing design development
             09/10   T/W   Tutorial  development and construction < in computer lab

    Wk11 15/10   Mon   Wrkshp  fine tuning on design and presentation
             16/10   T/W   Tutorial  construction

    Wk12 22/10   Mon   Lecture  TBD 
             23/10   T/W   Tutorial  Self-directed work week. No Tutorial

    Wk13 29/10   Mon   Lecture  No lecture
             30/10   T/W   Tutorial  Ass3 due > Final presentations
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. develop communication skills verbally and graphically in design context
    2. encourage spatial thinking through digital and physical modelling
    3. inspire critical vision/thinking for oneself and others
    4. improve clear and informed articulation of design ideas
    5. expand and confront one’s stereotypical boundary through design process.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    2,3
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2,4,5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1,3
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1,3,5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    3,5
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    4,3
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    - You will need continual access to MyUni(canvas) for regular updates and course material
    - The lectures will also facilitate discussion to course related matters.
    - All students are expected to read and be familiar with all provided course information available on MyUni(canvas).
    Recommended Resources
    Highly recommended to purchase:
    Ching, F., (2015) Architectural Graphics, Wiley Press.
    Delancy, M.,Gorman, A. (2015) Studio Craft & Technique for Architects, Laurence King Publishing.

    There are many recommended books. Here are just a sample:
    Ching, F., (1990) Drawing, a Creative Process, Van Nostrand Reinhold.
    Farrelly, L(2007) Basics Architecture 1:Representational Techniques, AVA Publishing.
    Gill, R.W., (1975) Creative Perspective, Thames & Hudson
    Hanks, K., (1977) Drawing: a Visual Approach to Thinking, Learning and Communicating, Los Altos.
    Hanks, K., (1980) Rapid Viz: A New Method for Rapid Visualization f Ideas, Los Altos.
    Luscombe, D. and Peden, A., (1992) Picturing Architecture, Craftsman House.
    Milton, H., (ed.), (1993) Glossary of Australian Building Terms, Sydney Building Information Centre.
    Montague, J., (1988) Basic Perspective Drawing: A Visual Approach, New York: Wiley Press.
    Powell, D., (1990) Presentation Techniques: A Guide to Drawing and Presenting Ideas, Macdonald.
    Spankie, R., (2009) Drawing Out the Interior, AVA Publishing.
    Standards Australia (1992) AS1100.101-1992 Technical Drawing - Part 101:General principles, Standards
    Standards Australia (1985) AS1100.301-1985 Technical Drawing - Part 301:Architectural drawing
    Taylor, A., (1992) Introduction to Construction Drawing, Prentice Hall.
    Thomson, A., (1993) Introduction to Construction Drawing, Edward Arnold.
    Unwin, S., (2003) Analysing Architecture, Routledge
    Wilkie, G. and Arden, S., (1993) Building Your Own Home, Lansdowne Press.
    Yee, R., (1997) Architectural Drawing: A Visual Compendium of Types and Methods, Wiley.
    Zell, Mo (2008) The Architectural Drawing Course, Thames & Hudson

    Speaker Series
    The School hosts a lecture series in the evenings (6pm Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre) where practitioners/academics will deliver a lecture on design practice. As students of Architecture/LA Architecture, it will be to your advantage to attend these lectures to engage with design discourse and expand your knowledge of and exposure to design practice. Details of dates and speakers will be available in due course.
    Online Learning
    University Email:
    The school uses the University email system to get in touch with the students. So it is imperative that you check your email regularly and keep up to date with any new announcements.

    MyUni(canvas):
    MyUni(canvas) is an essential online tool which will be used to communicate information regarding the course including details of assignments and interim grades. There are many other learning resources and assessment pieces that rely on the MyUni system for delivery. Therefore it is recommended that you familiarise yourself with the various functions of MyUni and employ it to its fullest extent. https://myuni-canvas.adelaide.edu.au/

    Discussion Board:
    The MyUni(canvas) Discussion Board can be used to interact with other students and tutors and is an essential tool to discuss information and increase your understanding of issues.

    Lecture Recording:
    In certain cases the recording of the lectures is made available in electronic format for students to listen through on their own time and make notes, and is provided through the MyUni(canvas) system. However, this service is only available for lectures with essential course content and may not include guest lectures. Furthermore, where the presentation content is subject to copyright or the guest speaker is uncomfortable with the recording of the content, the lecture recording will not be made available online. So students should not rely solely on this mode of learning and arrange to attend or get lecture content from peers.

    Noticeboard / Handbook:
    General information about the activities at the School is available online from the Student Noticeboard which can be accessed at
    https://unified.adelaide.edu.au/group/professons-studentarchitecture/ current-student
    Students can also access a copy of the Student Handbook at the following link:
    https://unified.adelaide.edu.au/group/professons-student-architecture/enrolments
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course requires high participation for each class. The course will include verbal communication between the students and teachers as well as use of MyUni and other digital mediums. There needs to be commitment from the students to do enough self-directed studies in order to participate in class.

    - Lectures:
    Students are required to attend lectures as these will provide the initial basis for further discussion and critique toward development of assessable outputs. Lectures may not be recorded. PDFs of slides may be provided but these may not contain critical verbal explanations of visual material. A range of lectures will background the diverse range of understandings and practice of design thinking.

    - Tutorial:
    time will be devoted to discussion of assessable assignment material and some exercises supporting delivery of the assignments. They are also the primary means to receive individual feedback via work-in-progress reviews. At this level of learning, peer review and commentary is encouraged as a valuable learning tool, both in offering comment on fellow-students’ work and in receiving and responding to comment on your own work. It is considered desirable to change and evolve your
    position throughout the course. Tutorials involve discussion and revision of points of view.

    - Workshop:
    It will be held in computer lab and time will be spent on developing and learning necessary computer skills to work on assignment material and some exercises supporting delivery of the assignments. They are also the primary means to receive individual feedback via work-in-progress reviews. At this level of learning, peer review and commentary is encouraged as a valuable learning tool, both in offering comment on fellow-students’ work and in receiving and responding to comment on your own work.

    - Small Group Discovery:
    There will be tasks undertaken as part of the ‘small group discovery’ mode of teaching & learning.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    This is a 6 unit course. Students in this course are expected to attend 6 hours of lecture/ tutorial/ workshop each week and allow for 18 hours of self-directed learning each week. That is a total of 24 hours a week for 12 weeks. The tutorials and other activities, including reviews of work in progress are an important component of learning in this course. The communication skills developed by regularly and actively participating in activities and discussions are considered extremely important by the School and are highly regarded by employers and professional bodies.


    Learning Activities Summary
    Lectures are on Mondays 3-5pm Engineering Nth, N158, Chapman Lecture Theatre. Tutorials are on Tues/Wed in Union House 432, Margaret Murray Room. Workshops (wk 3,4,10,11) are on Mondays in Arch computer suite.

    Wk01 23/7  Mon  Lecture  Course introduction
             24/7  T/W  Tutorial  Making surface stand and hold (Small Group Discovery)

    Wk02 30/7  Mon  Lecture  spatial experience
             31/7  T/W  Tutorial  site model building

    Wk03 06/8  Mon  Wrkshp  Introduction to Rhino
             07/8  T/W  Tutorial  creating site in Rhino < in computer lab

    Wk04 13/8  Mon  Wrkshp  more tools in Rhino
             14/8  T/W  Tutorial  creating project in Rhino / Ass1a due < in computer lab

    Wk05 20/8  Mon  Lecture  structure: Speaker Nick Roach
             21/8  T/W  Tutorial  creating digital in physical

    Wk06 27/8  Mon  Lecture  Meaning and Emotion: Speaker TBD 
             28/8  T/W  Tutorial  Ass1b due > discussion

    Wk07 03/9  Mon  Lecture  Making digital and physical: Speaker TBD
             04/9  T/W  Tutorial  developing surface into space < in computer lab

    Wk08 10/9  Mon  Lecture  Expression: Speaker TBD
             11/9  T/W  Tutorial  constructing surface into space < indiv consultation sign up

    Mid-Semester Break

    Wk09 01/10  Mon - Holiday
             02/10  T/W  Tutorial  Ass2 due > discussion

    Wk10 08/10  Mon  Wrkshp  finalizing design development
             09/10  T/W  Tutorial  development and construction < in computer lab

    Wk11 15/10  Mon  Wrkshp  fine tuning on design and presentation
             16/10  T/W  Tutorial  construction

    Wk12 22/10  Mon  Lecture  TBD
             23/10  T/W  Tutorial  Self-directed work week

    Wk13 29/10  Mon  Lecture  No lecture
             30/10  T/W  Tutorial  Ass3 due > Final presentations
    Specific Course Requirements
    It is highly recommended that you own a personal laptop computer which can support computer software such as Rhino, photoshop, illustrator, indesign.
    Ideal spec for student laptop: 17 inch, Windows 64 bit, minimum of 16 gig of RAM, Intel i7 (or equivalent). Nvidia GeForce GTX 260 or higher; ATI Radeon HD 4890 or better.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    There will be tasks undertaken as part of the ‘small group discovery’ mode of teaching & learning.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Throughout the semester, you will be working on developing a three dimensional surface with spatial experience. The project site will be identified and informed in due time in class. Without being bounded by stereotypical ideas of what architecture should be, students are encouraged to explore what three dimensional surface could be. The goal of the assignments is to help you explore and develop your own potential in design thinking. The students are encouraged to explore the possibilities of all available tools. Be experimental in what you use, how you use. Be critical about what you are doing and seeing. Keep an open mind and your eyes open to see how other architects and designers express their ideas.

    Assessment TaskTask TypeDue DateWeightLearning Outcomes
    0- PARTICIPATION Quizzes and Tasks each class 10% 1,2,3,4,5
    Attendance/Participation
    1- SURFACE a. Digital 14/15Aug (wk04) 20% 1,2,3
    b. Physical 28/29Aug (wk06)
    2- SURFACE SPACE **ASSESMENT HURDLE** 02/03Oct (wk09) 30% 2,3,4,5
    3- SURFACE EXPERIENCE 30/31Oct (wk13) 40% 1,2,3,4,5
    Total 100%
    Assessment Related Requirements
    It is highly recommended that you own a personal laptop computer which can support computer software such as Rhino, photoshop, illustrator, indesign.
    Ideal spec for student laptop: 17 inch, Windows 64 bit, minimum of 16 gig of RAM, Intel i7 (or equivalent). Nvidia GeForce GTX 260 or higher; ATI Radeon HD 4890 or better.
    Assessment Detail
    0- Participation
    Quizzes: At the end of each lecture, there will be quiz to be completed before you leave the class. The quiz will be based on the lecture that is given on the day. This will count as attendance.

    Tasks: At end of each tutorial and workshop, there will be task to be completed in class. You will be instructed to submit completed task on Canvas in each class. This will count as attendance; therefore it is critical to complete and submit at the end of every class.

    Attendance/Participation in both lectures and tutorials/workshops are required.



    1- Assignment 1: Surface
    1a: Familiarise yourself with Rhino and begin developing a three dimensional surface in digital realm. You are encouraged to explore and experiment with the digital tool. Keep in mind that towards the end of the course you will need to discuss experience with what you develop.
    - 'capture viewport to file' of 'rendered viewport' of your surface digital model
    - minimum four views: looking up from the bottom, top view, overall side view, somewhere inside surfaces
    - you are encouraged to submit more than one option.
    - photos of your surface physical model
    - submit all images in single PDF file on MyUni.
    - Due 14/15 August (wk04) end of day

    Assessment Criteria
    - creative thinking/ solution to the problem
    - exploration of digital tools
    - joy/amusement/effort in the solution

    1b: Create your digital creation with physical material in reality at scale of 1:100, including immediate site context.
    - Due 28/29 August (wk06) in tutorial
    - Take nice photographs of your model (nice lighting, plain background etc) minimum 4 views, top, bottom, side, detail.
    - Submit photos of the model as single PDF on MyUni by 30 August

    Assessment Criteria
    - quality of translation of digital to physical
    - craftsman ship of the model
    - joy/amusement/energy in the solution


    2- Assignment 2: Surface Space
    ** ASSESMENT HURDLE** - MUST PASS THIS ASSIGNMENT IN ORDER TO PASS THIS COURSE.
    Continuing in developing the surface, based on the feedback for previous assignment, review critically of what you have created and begin developing ideas for special qualities/situation with your surface. This exploration needs to happen both digitally and physically.
    - 1:50 physical model of the surface including immediate site
    - A1 poster of your surface space which should include:
    title, your name, 2 section drawings at 1:100, few experiential images, development process from the beginning of the semester.
    - Due 02/03 October (wk09) in tutorial
    - Also submit photos of the model and PDF of the poster on MyUni by 04 Oct.

    Assessment Criteria
    - craftsmanship of the model
    - critical eyes, observation in development of the surface
    - exploration of three dimensional surface as space
    - quality of the poster presentation
    - joy/amusement/risk in the solution


    3- Assignment 3: SURFACE EXPERIENCE
    Group will be formed based on previous assignment. As a group, develop a three dimensional surface in given site which begin to discuss spatial experience. As a group you will be developing a physical model at the scale of 1:20. Along with the model should be a presentation poster which includes section drawing, experience image and explanation.
    - physical model at 1:20
    - A0 portrait printed poster, should include:
    1:50 section drawing (unless negotiated with tutors ahead of time as 1:100)
    minumum four experiential images using maxwell render + photoshop
    process explaining how 4/5 designs came together into one final design
    title of the project, your names and explanation text.
    - Due 30/31 October (wk13) as final presentation
    - Also submit photographs of models and PDF of the poster on MyUni by 02 Nov.

    Assessment Criteria
    - creative thinking and development of the surface
    - exploration/investigation of three dimensional surface as spatial experience
    - joy/amusement/risk in the solution
    - craftsmanship of the model
    - clarity and composition of the presentation layout


    **Details of the assignments may change during the semester. It will be announced in class, email or through MyUni.**
    Submission

    Assignment No. & Name Due Date Wt. Submission Method
    0- PARTICIPATION Quizzes and Tasks
    each class
    10%

    In class MyUni 
    Attendance/Participation In class
    1- SURFACE a. Digital 15Aug (wk04) 20%

    MyUni 
    b. Physical 29Aug (wk06) MyUni + in class discussion
    2- SURFACE SPACE **ASSESMENT HURDLE** 03Oct (wk09) 30% MyUni + in class discussion
    3- SURFACE EXPERIENCE 31Oct (wk13) 40% MyUni + presentation


    All assignments must be submitted at the time and place as indicated above. Any change will be announces in class or through email. Note that NO LATE submissions will be accepted unless it is due to illness and other accepted circumstances as explained in the School's Student Handbook.

    Selected submissions of the Final Assignment will be included in the All-In Exhibition at the end of the semester.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.