MUSJAZZ 1500A - Jazz Theory 1 Part 1

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2015

Lecture/Tutorial: study of jazz theory and application through the keyboard. Includes guidelines for critical listening, study and practical application of scales (tetrachords, modes of the major and minor scales, blues scale), major and minor harmony concepts including diatonic chord function and chord voicing, chord and scale relationship, smooth voice leading, diatonic and tritone substitution, chord extensions, reading and playing chord progressions. Introduction to acoustics and the perception of sound. Application of secondary dominants, cyclic progressions and turnarounds, rhythm changes, extended and altered chords, diminished scales and harmony, cadences and deceptive/delayed resolution, tune analysis, chord-scale relationships, reading and playing chord progressions. Development of piano keyboard skills and application of above concepts to keyboard including self accompaniment techniques. Aural: development of listening skills in the range of sound elements: meter, rhythm, pitch, harmony, timbre, texture, dynamics, articulation and structure and in the detection of errors occurring between sounds heard and written notation. Expression of these elements through standard musical notation, and written language. Application of analytical and critical listening skills to a wide range of musical styles within the jazz area and beyond, including multicultural, popular, classical, and electronic music.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MUSJAZZ 1500A
    Course Jazz Theory 1 Part 1
    Coordinating Unit Elder Conservatorium of Music
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Restrictions Available to Bachelor of Music students only
    Course Description Lecture/Tutorial: study of jazz theory and application through the keyboard. Includes guidelines for critical listening, study and practical application of scales (tetrachords, modes of the major and minor scales, blues scale), major and minor harmony concepts including diatonic chord function and chord voicing, chord and scale relationship, smooth voice leading, diatonic and tritone substitution, chord extensions, reading and playing chord progressions. Introduction to acoustics and the perception of sound. Application of secondary dominants, cyclic progressions and turnarounds, rhythm changes, extended and altered chords, diminished scales and harmony, cadences and deceptive/delayed resolution, tune analysis, chord-scale relationships, reading and playing chord progressions. Development of piano keyboard skills and application of above concepts to keyboard including self accompaniment techniques.
    Aural: development of listening skills in the range of sound elements: meter, rhythm, pitch, harmony, timbre, texture, dynamics, articulation and structure and in the detection of errors occurring between sounds heard and written notation. Expression of these elements through standard musical notation, and written language. Application of analytical and critical listening skills to a wide range of musical styles within the jazz area and beyond, including multicultural, popular, classical, and electronic music.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mr Bruce Hancock

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Students will develop a fundamental knowledge of jazz harmony and theory concepts.
    2. Students will acquire and develop a range of skills to seek out relevant information.
    3. Students will analyse and apply concepts of music theory to their development as musicians.
    4. Students will develop a foundation of skills in jazz piano to support the practical application of theory concepts and serve as an aid to study throughout the rest of the degree program.
    5. Students will further develop their aural skills within jazz repertoire.

     

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1,
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 3, 4, 5
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1, 3
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Essential jazz theory topics are presented/explained within weekly jazz theory lectures of 1 hour duration. Application and further discussion of these topics occurs in weekly tutorial sessions, where assignments and exercises are also presented. The Aural Workshop provides development of listening skills in the range of sound elements: meter, rhythm, pitch, harmony, timbre, texture, dynamics, articulation and structure and in the detection of errors occurring between sounds heard and written notation
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

     

    ·         3 contact hours per week for scheduled classes

    ·         2 to 3 hours per week for study & assignments

    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT (Summative) Learning Objective/s Addressed
    Semester 1  
    Assessment breakdown Ongoing Assessment (assignments) 10% 1, 2, 3
    90 min written theory examination - end of semester. 15% 1
    Keyboard Assessment 10% 1, 3, 4
    Aural Assesssment 15% 5
    Semester 2  
    Assessment breakdown Ongoing Assessment (assignments) 10% 1, 2, 3
    90 min written theory examination - end of semester. 15% 1
    Keyboard Assessment 10% 1, 3, 4
    Aural Assessment 15% 5
    Assessment Related Requirements

    Both the Theory and Aural components must be passed in order the pass the course as a whole.

    Assessment Detail

    Specific details of the assessment for each component will be provided by the Lecturer in charge of that component.

    Submission

    Students must be available during the identified University examination periods. Students are not entitled to sit an examination at another time, nor are they entitled to any other concessions if an examination conflicts with a planned vacation or special event.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    NOG (No Grade Associated)
    Grade Description
    CN Continuing

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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  • Policies & Guidelines
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